small little league memory

One of my favorite bloggers has shared another great story. This one reminded me a little bit of the feelings I shared in Jupiter Effect I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

itkindofgotawayfromyou

One of those  little league seasons when I was a kid , Bobby Devinney and I sat the entire time on the bench . By the end of the game , if our team was either winning or losing by a bunch , the coach would put Bobby and/or  me out there in right field for the last  inning . Often it happened to be the last half of the last inning . Big deal , eh ?

It was the old worst- case scenario of Little League coaching . The coach’s son was a pretty good athlete , but he was also a loud-mouthed arrogant jerk . He was the team star and his buddies played every inning of every game . Sort of a sports version of the spoils system . baseball 1

Neither  Bobby nor I were friends of the coach’s son  , and we were quiet boys …

View original post 718 more words

About Dan Antion

Husband, father, woodworker, cyclist, photographer, geek - oh wait, I’m writing this like I only have 140 characters. I am all those things, and more, and all of these passions present me with opportunities to observe, and think about things that I can’t write about in other places. I have started this blog to catch the stuff that falls out, overflows and just plain doesn’t fit the other containers in my life.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to small little league memory

  1. loisajay says:

    Luckily my kids had good coaches; however, the coaches who we played who had ‘winning is everything’ attitudes just ruined it for everyone. I feel for those kids who warmed the bench…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I’m glad your kids had good coaches, it makes a world of difference. So few kids are going to have a career of any sort in any sport. The most important lessons are teamwork , respect and sportsmanship. when the coaches don’t exhibit those attributes, you’re exactly right, they ruin it for everyone.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Lily Lau says:

    Finding a good coach seems so difficult sometimes… especially when you read on the news again and again that they caught a pedophile that was a kids coach, my blood boils!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I hear such a range of stories. One thing that surprises me is the number of good coaches who quit because the parents want the team to win more than they want the kids to have fun.

      Like

  3. Unlike football that I don’t understand, I like baseball for the ambiance and … the outfit (the French speaking here). But the story you share is too sad! Things like that happen in all sorts of sports and other after school activities. Adults should see more than the winning aspect. Kids can easily be discouraged and get bitter when stuck on the sidelines.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I shared Dan’s story with the hope of raising the awareness of the message you offered here, even if just a little bit Evelyne. I’ve seen coaches for Midget Football in our neighborhood yelling at little kids as if they were preparing for the Super Bowl. Adults should be trusted to nurture skills, keep these kids safe and make sure they emerge better off for the experience. They don’t all need to get a medal, but they all should be allowed to play. Unfortunately, too many adults are living out their own unfulfilled dreams at the expense of children.

      Since you brought it up, do you follow any particular team in baseball?

      Like

  4. Paul says:

    I don’t blame the kid one bit. Funny how it’s the kids that are supposed to be learning lessons, and yet it was the adult who got schooled in this situation. Big time. And the kid learned a valuable lesson about the unfairness of life and how you just have to deal with it. Glad that he took a stand. I don’t know, but I’m guessing it was beneficial to both him and the coach in the long run.

    Liked by 1 person

Add your thoughts. Start or join the discussion. Sadly, links require moderation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s