The End of an Era

Pantene, you had me at: “Shampoo and Conditioner in One.” To me that mean half the time, half the risk of getting burny stuff in my eyes and half the number of bottles in the shower. That last bit is important. When you’re a guy, sharing a bathroom with your wife and teenage daughter, you don’t get much shelf space.

I first met Pantene® in a hotel. It seemed simple enough, saved some time and left what little hair I have left on my head feeling pretty good. Done. I don’t put a lot of time into evaluating personal cleansing products. Up until about 15 years ago, I had used the same soap, Safeguard™ since I was old enough to use big-people soap. It’s what my parents used. It got me clean. My wife didn’t like the idea of me washing with so many chemicals. In a unilateral action, she swapped out my bar of Safeguard™ for some green organic product cooked up in a cauldron deep in the woods of Maine (1). The stuff works fine. No use fighting over soap.

She doesn’t use Pantene®, but she hasn’t made a fuss over my using it. She will even buy it for me when she’s shopping, but she always asks me “what shampoo do you use?” when I tell her that I’m almost out. What shampoo? Pantene®. How hard is that to remember? (I would think, but never say).

Last week, I went to Target and I decided to restock my own toiletry items (you know, the Lent thing). I needed Pantene® and I needed dandruff shampoo. Yeah, it’s not bad enough that much off my hair is gone, the stuff that’s left still needs a hit of Head & Shoulders® now and then. And, yes, I’ve been using Head & Shoulders® since I was a kid too.

Confusion set in.

The first thing I was confused by was the fact that Head & Shoulders® and Pantene® aren’t in the same place in Target. Head & Shoulders® is in the “Men’s Hair Care” aisle and Pantene® is in the “Hair Products” aisle. What? Don’t women have dandruff? Maybe Head & Shoulders® is the Lava Soap of dandruff shampoos. A heavy-duty cleaner for a man’s dandruff. Maybe women use some ginger root dandruff shampoo with Aloe, coconut and fairy dust.

The second thing I was confused by, and the reason I have to think about apologizing to my wife for all those unsaid-but-still-snarky shopping comments, is that there is an entire section of Head & Shoulders® and there’s an entire Pantene® aisle in Target. There are 10 bazillion kinds of shampoo.

It took me several minutes to find the Head & Shoulders® product that I wanted. You know, the “Original Formula.” The old tried and true. The stuff I’ve been using since I was 12. It wasn’t labeled like that, but I found the “Classic Clean” variety. I bought the biggest bottle they had. If it came in a gallon bottle with a pump, I might have bought that so I’d only have to go through this process once a year. Plus, I’d have that full-on manly look. You know the kind of bottle that says “this is the kind of shampoo they use in the pit at Indy.”

Over in the Pantene® aisle, there was no “Classic Clean” version. In fact, there wasn’t even a version that said “Shampoo and Conditioner in One” on the bottle. “Repair and Protect” but not “Shampoo and Conditioner.” In fact, they now have “Shampoo” and “Conditioner” in two bottles, not one, and they have versions of those. “Clarifying” shampoo. “Lightweight” conditioner and so many other products that I couldn’t back up far enough to get the Pantene® section to fit in the wide angle version of my camera!

It’s over Pantene. We had a good run but we need to see other people. It’s not you, it’s me. You want to grow. You want to achieve more, try new things, and scale new heights. I would just be holding you back.”

That might be what I said in the store, but inside my head, as with any good breakup, I was thinking:

All our years together mean nothing to you. You’re willing to toss our history aside just so you can lather up your fancy female friends. Well, I don’t need you. I’ll find a good man’s shampoo. Something with pumice and wood pulp and harsh chemicals that’s tough enough for a man’s dirt.”

It’s not just shampoo. Everything comes in too many choices. It’s why shopping is such a hassle. If Pantene sold just the original, maybe an expanded flavor or two, Target could be the size of a 7-11 and we could be in and out in 15 minutes flat. I have pictures of chips, candy, crackers, salsa and cough drops. Cough drops! I remember when it was Ludens, Smith Bros. or Halls and if you ate the cherry ones too fast, your mom was sure to buy the black licorice variety the next time. Today, you need to be some sort of certified medical professional to self-diagnose the type of cough you have.

I’ll stop complaining. I could go on and on about all of those products. I’m sure. I’m so sure, that I created a category for this post. If this self-sufficient practice of mine hasn’t worn off by Memorial Day, prepare yourself for a Doritos rant. By the way, is there any harm in using dandruff shampoo every day or do I have to work with those folks up in Maine?

(1) According to my editor, the green stuff is Olive Oil soap and it’s made in Greece

79 thoughts on “The End of an Era

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  1. I use green soap, too. Mine’s made in Brooklyn tho.
    Alright, now, when our kids were small, it was very easy, shampoo and conditioner in one for kids, somethin unisex like coconut, and cheap because kids think more shampoo is better, right? lol Shampoo and conditioner for me. The Mister just used what I used. Then for awhile, Sassy’s hair was like corn silk, so she needed light shampoo and leave-in conditioner for her ends. Then like her brother and I, she hit puberty and her hair got all crazy thick and curly, but she had a sensitive scalp, so she couldn’t use what I used. She had to use what he used, which was tea tree oil shampoo and conditioner. But Moo couldn’t use that, because it made her scalp itch and she couldn’t use mine because it left build-up. As we got older, the changes kept comin. My hair is less curly and more thin, The Mister doesn’t have hair, Bubba needs the Head n’ Shoulders for what little hair he has left, Sassy uses what I use, and Moo, well Moo’s got perfect shampoo model hair, but she lives the life of a wild animal, so she needs serious shampoo and light conditioner. I haven’t talked to Sissy about her hair care lately, but last I knew, she had fallen in love with some Garnier stuff that made her want to eat berries all the time. So yes, I am one of the people who chose, “I love variety…”
    I do find it irritating when I can’t get plain something, or traditional something, but there are 26 varieties of it. Like Cheerios and Oreos…*grumble*

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Initially, I was going to write about 47 varieties of English Muffins, but then it became crackers and then candy. I kept taking pictures, updating the draft and putting it back. Then I tried buying shampoo and everything hit the fan.

      I do see how there can be a need for variety here, especially given the conditions (no pun intended) that you describe. In fact, there was quite a variety of hair-care products around here before my daughter left for college.

      Good luck.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I buy what is on sale. I have absolutely no brand loyalty. But I do have a complaint about font size. My aging eyeballs, especially those squinched shut against the stream of water in the shower, cannot read the minuscule print on the bottles. So. The solution? Shampoo on the left, and conditioner on the right. Woe befall the hubby who should rearrange the bottles on MY shelf in the tub!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The shelf I used didn’t have enough height for the Pantene bottle Maggie so I transfered small quantities into a small squeeze bottle. That also makes it easier to know what I’m using. Now that it’s just my wife and I, I take advantage of the height difference and put my bottles on top of the shower surround. I am sure that I understand, like your hub, that that other shelf is off limits. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Honey has several designated brands of shampoo and conditioner, but I just grab what’s on sale, as long as it doesn’t smell to garden-like. Considering how little I have left and how short I keep it, a big bottle can last me months, which is good, because I dread having to buy the stuff. It really is just ridiculous how many choices there are now.

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  4. The Lava soap of dandruff shampoo, ha,ha, very funny. :D I would be surprised if you still had either hair or dandruff if you used Lava soap on your head. I think it is more of a male thing to use the shampoo and condition combo in one. Pert still makes the combo.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Deborah, maybe I’ll give Pert a try. Maybe it is a guy thing. Maybe that’s why they dropped it and moved into the “beauty” section of Target – leaving the guys behind with only Head & Shoulders :)

      Liked by 1 person

    1. “Clean, natural, pure” I see those words on the bottles at the Mrs’ end of the shower. Thanks Mary. I may give that some thought. On the other hand, I might ask my wife for a recommendation for some of that coco-aloe-fairy-dust stuff. The soap she has me using has been better for my skin. She might just be right.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I’ve read about some grocery stores that are actually setting up a “guy aisle” where all of the things men typically buy are proximate to each other. That would work for me, but it would be less money for the store because I tend to be a pretty big impulse buyer. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. oh my gosh–this was so much fun! I spend $25 for a bottle of shampoo that I buy at my salon. I buy my husband the cheapest shampoo I can find in WalMart (it’s cheaper than Target). But, lest you think ‘boy, isn’t she a real sweetheart,’ I will explain. I have thick hair and want a good shampoo and conditioner. My husband needs clean scalp–he has minimal hair. He would wash his hair with soap if I let him, but I do have scruples. I alternate between buying him renew and restore (our joke–yes, this will restore your hair, honey) and clarifying. To which he says, “Clarify what?” He is very happy to have me shop–he has seen the shampoo aisle. Scary.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think I’m about to pull that string and just let my wife buy what seems like a good choice for me on any given day. When I looked at the varieties, I wasn’t even sure what the words meant. I would have the same question, what are we clarifying, and are we defining it better or removing the fat? Thanks for the comment. By the way, once while staying in a crummy hotel (that didn’t provide shampoo) I did just wash my hair with soap for a few days :)

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ha! He-Man was just telling me the other day that he needs me to refill his conditioner bottle …I buy a leave-in-conditioner in half gallon jugs when on sale at the Beauty Supply store then refill the regular size bottle as needed. He uses any ole shampoo, but said to me, ” I really need you to refill the conditioner bottle cause my hair is all over the place without it.” I said, “You’re using the wrong shampoo then.”

    I can’t be Brand Loyal to shampoo because my Fine, Curly hair gets finicky after a month or so of one shampoo and conditioner so I rotate between a couple, three brands, but I always use a Leave-in-Conditioner.

    I have been using Safeguard soap for over 30 yrs. It started with the birth of my first born. His pediatrician told me to use “Safeguard” soap on his body, and wash his scalp/hair with Head and Shoulders 2 twice a week. He said Head & Shoulders would him “Cradle Cap” free. It did. When Big Baby Boy reached 2 yrs old I switched him a regular shampoo for most his shampooing, but still used H&S once a week on him.

    Instead of buying two types of soap for me and babies I began using Safeguard too, but He-Man likes Dove, Dial, and Lever so he stocks up with one of these brands when it’s time for him to replace his bath soap.

    When Baby Girl came along I did what the Pediatrician said to use for bath soap and Shampoo: Safeguard, but by then I’d switched to T-Gel for staving off dandruff so, used that. Then when Baby Girl was a month old or so her Baby Acne got bad so I started using Cetaphil on her face. Which is what I’ve used on my face for most of my adult life.

    When #1 Grandson came along I recommended Safeguard and T-Gel. Baby Girl started using use both on him.
    Neither of my kids ever got Cradle Cap and neither did Grandson, and I think they have lovely skin. :)

    BTW- I can’t find Safeguard or my Tea in the my market or drug store anymore so buy both at Amazon.

    RE: Daily H&S. I think daily for one to two weeks to get the issue under control then once a week or once or twice a month for maintenance… which ever works best for you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I miss Safeguard but I do have skin issues and the soap my wife has me using has made that better (I hope she stopped reading these comments before I started mentioning that :) – I like the idea of a pump bottle that I can use to refill a smaller bottle. I almost don’t care what’s in the pump, I have a pump bottle of GoJo but I guess that’s not good for hair.

      I have to say that I don’t know what a leave-in-conditioner is but it sounds complicated. Amazon does have the Pantene 2-in-1 shampoo but I keep thinking that they bought a warehouse full of in in 1998 and are changing the sell-by dates :)

      Thakns for the helpful comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. They don’t carry the Head & Shoulders I want because the “original formula” isn’t — it stinks to high heaven of some perfume crapola — and so I have to buy it online — seriously — to get something that doesn’t make me sneeze. And I am not even allergic to smells! I HATE shopping for any of this stuff and do often do it online especially as many places hip free. On the other hand, I love shopping for foodstuffs and don’t mind many choices there — especially when it comes to fresh veggies an fruit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am saddened by the fact that some of this “marketing” might actually be encouraging people to shop online. It would be unfortunate to lose local stores because they tried to get too big. By the way, I’m all for more options w.r.t. fresh veggies. I am so looking forward to the season of farm stands being open all around the state.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thankfully I only do it for products I can’t get locally — which is two. I agree and want to have a store I can walk into — and now that Amazon has been okayed to fill our skies with damn drones I am boycotting. Period.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I’m having a good laugh here! Do tell your editor that I might try her green olive oil soap.
    I was first I introduced to Pantene when my oldest daughter was about 7 years old. Her hair was just a mess back then and she was mesmerized by the TV commercials. She KNEW it worked for her, but I was the one combing and brushing her rapunzel hair.
    Now about “original”, a few months ago, I asked my husband to buy me a box of soy milk; I assumed he knew which one I drank, after all, the box is a constant in the fridge. Wrong! Well, even if he knew, confusion got the better of him when he saw the choices. Of course, he called me and I simply said, “buy the regular flavor”. Mistake! There is no “regular” flavor. Poor fella looked and looked for that regular flavor until he probably turned blue! I’m glad he decided to pick up the “original”😄😄

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks for the comment Elaine. These days, sending someone to the store for milk, eggs and bread can be a daunting task. Fortunately, we buy our dairy at a local farm. Few choices and easy to make. Companies should be required to always identify the “original” product.

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  9. Dan, I feel your pain. Been through the same experience from trying to find the original Old Spice (love the scent on my man!) and unfortunately the plastic bottles changed the flavor. Ugh. I’ve stood for way too long in front of the hair care products, finally threw up my hands in disgust, and bought something cheap at the dollar store. I don’t mind the 101 varieties, but why dump the tried and true? Are we old, long time customers valuable, too? Anyway, thanks for the rant. You aren’t alone.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I would recommend going into a dark room to see if you glow in the dark . If not , use the dandruff shampoo .
    You have expressed my wife Ada’s recurring complaint about too many choices . Me , I guess I don’t pay that much attention and just go by price . If it’s on sale and cheaper than the other , then it’s for me .

    Liked by 1 person

  11. LOL LOL we could definitely have collaborated on this one, Dan. I have photos of the 20 kinds of cheerios and 14 kinds of triscuits in my draft file, and I laughed when you said you couldn’t back up far enough to capture the full extent of your mind-boggling choices because that was exactly my frustration with too narrow aisles in thinking my photos didn’t capture the true essence of the choice excess (along with a little fear the security guard would apprehend me for suspicious activity).

    Hub does the majority of our grocery shopping because I get overwhelmed by anxiety and frustration. Some of it is because I need to eat plain, bland items and the marketers keep adding spicy and hot and caramel and all kinds of things that inflame my mouth and digestive tract. Just give me plain potato chips and triscuits, PLEASE!! But even Hub came home a few days ago with complaints that they keep changing the packaging so you have to search anew for the specific item that used to be recognizable.

    I had some green bars of olive oil soap from my Greece visit and I loved it. A wise woman, your salon stylist 😋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sorry of a raided your draft folder Sammy, but I too have pictures of the Triscuits! And, candy, and English Muffins and yogurt and soup AND bread. Wheat, white, rye and Italian was enough. Not there are hundreds of kins of bread to choose from. Some of it doesn’t even look like bread. About a year ago, I was somewhere where they were serving Ritz cracker crispy things. I loved them. I saw them in the store and I bought two bags. One was the stuff l likes but one was some weird flavor that I ended up throwing out. The other thing about Target is that they keep moving stuff around in the store.

      Maybe we can divide up the store. You take bread and crackers, I’ll work on the 40 kinds of hot dogs next :)

      Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Is it any wonder we get crankier as we get older!?! Even ruce cakes – HELLO – do they think people buy rice cakes because they like them and crave different flavors? NO ( I wish I could type a bigger NO). The only people who buy rice cakes buy them because THEY CAN’t EAT BREAD AND CRACKERS WITH FLAVORING!!!

        Liked by 1 person

          1. Just re-read your post in a couple weeks at which time you’ll forget which of us wrote it.

            I will be sure to video if/when I have an “I can’t take it anymore.” meltdown in the cereal aisle.

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    2. Yes, when did companies lose sight of brand recognition. Really makes me mad. I used to simply think that they had discontinued my brand then realized that they just don’t get visual people. If I have to stand and read all that verbiage then I am not going to buy . . . They really should band us together to be the controllers of all that is sold!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I like that idea Kate! Or limit your product to Original and 2 or 3 other varieties. The biggest thing I hate is when the original flavor is sold out and only the experiments remain on the shelf. I know they have more in the back.

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      2. And don’t you love it when you get to checkout and the hapless clerk chirps, “Did you find everything you need?” I don’t go off on them because it’s not their fault but sometimes I feel like a ticking time bomb.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Dan, I DREAD shopping. I get overwhelmed! There is just too much of everything, too many choices to make. How many varieties to you need for a certain brand of something? And then when my grocery store does the two man shuffle, as in rearranging entire aisles so the shopper, who is used to something in a certain spot (oh heavens!) must now look at all the other products in order to find the product you are looking for, and in the process, yup, buy more. I’m with you all the way, and I voted TOO MUCH … just sayin’. We as consumers are on overload! We need to get back to simple but I sure don’t see that happening any time soon!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Amy. I just added the bit about rearranging the store to my comment to Sammy. I don’t shop often and each time I go I have to figure the place out again. It must be part of Retail 101 – A confused shopper spends more money. I can’t wait for the pendulum to swing back and see small grocery stores make a come back.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m right there with you, Dan. Everything comes and goes in cycles …. all in life does. This impossible insanity of more more more must come crashing down sometime and we will then get back to simple. Smaller. And I will let out a huge sigh of relief when it does!! Perhaps I may not live long enough to see this change. But change will come. It has to.

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  13. Seeing those displays just feels so overwhelming to me. I actually kind of get paralyzed. So in response I stopped buying those products. Grocery stores do all kinds of weird things. Like why are ‘Asian’ noodles separated from ‘regular?” Italian style noodles? The ‘Asian’ noodles are like three sections away from the so-called ‘pasta’ aisle. Why are there Asian or other ‘ethnic’ food sections? Isn’t that kind of bizarre? I once was stopped at the exit of the store where someone was doing a survey. One of the questions made me laugh out loud. They asked what kind of food do you normally buy — like American food or ethnic food. I had to fire off the response: What exactly did they mean by American food?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Debra, I share your reaction. I recently did some grocery shopping for my daughter when she was sick. I almost wrote this post then. I spent so much time wandering up and down the aisle thinking “why isn’t this with that” type questions. One of the things she wanted me to get was English Muffins – seriously, why do we need 40 kinds of English Muffins?

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      1. haha Some stand-up comedian must have an act worked out because the logic of these places is truly bizarre. At our local store the English muffins are placed next to the eggs instead of in the bakery. Confused shoppers may spend more time wandering around but in my case I end up spending less money rather than more out of pique. The first few times I sent my son out to the store by himself to pick things up he came back in a state of shock, poor thing. I felt so bad after because I had taken the insanity for granted.

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  14. Okay, I shared this post with my husband, and Dan, he had whole other thang to weigh in on, having to do with shaving. He is beyond annoyed with the lack of a single or double blade — talking about how now you have to buy these insane five-blade items that cost $2/shave, and are too big for anyone’s face! I know — and forgot — as I have hunted for a double blade refill for him. More rants, and I am sure if I mention I just posted this I will get another earfull!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I totally agree with him. I actually buy cheap disposable razors when I travel. I use an electric razor at home but I don’t like to carry it. I also have a beard, so there isn’t much to shave.

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  15. I like having lots of options… but good grief, I get cross-eyed before i get halfway down the line. (I have this weird thing — i develop allergies (particularly to shampoos) if i use the same thing repeatedly. So I’m supposed to have a minimum of 12 to rotate. Who has money or cabinet space for that?! But I do try to have 4 or 5 — hence me liking to have options.)
    Have a splendid Sunday. Hugs. :D

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rotating between 12 shampoo brands – wow, I think I’d go crazy. I’d have to write an App for my phone to tell me what to use. I have a hard enough time remembering to use the dandruff shampoo twice a week. Still, that’s a very good reason for the options. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I was a great fan of Heads and Shoulders, until I used Heads & Shoulders made internationally. I found there is a difference between the two. I later moved on to Pantene and I am still stuck to it. In India, there are many Ayurvedic shampoos available as well, made completely from plants and herbs extract and they also capture good amount of market share as many female consumers use it. These shampoos do not show quick results but when you use them regularly they are effective. Probably that’s why a major chunk of it is exported from India. Do you guys have any Ayurvedic stores there in Connecticut? I mean have you ever come across such a word.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ayurvedic is a type of medicine almost as old as acupuncture and Chinese medicine. Herbal, food-as-medicine, but it speak to a different “system” (doshas) than Western Doctors — so it sounds very woo-woo because of that, but it is only due to our unfamiliarity with the doshas. Just like the Chinese speak of having certain wind (a cold) ayurvedics might want to balance the doshas. So they would look at an itchy scalp as a dosha imbalance and seek to right it with diet (if the doc were in front of you) and herbal shampoos. And they are right — an ichy scalp (dandruff), even if you’ve had it since you were a child, is actually about an allergy or an imbalance. Trust me, there are great things in this world and IF our western doctors were as smart as they think they are they would be doing what the smart doctors of the world are doing — as in, Chinese doctors learn how to do heart surgery but use acupuncture for arthritis because they go with the best treatments for the condition; ayruvedic doctors also learn surgery and then use their lovely balancing to cure the many illnesses that our docs throw drugs at which, btw, in turn usually cause a host of other problems. I have “cured” my arthritis with Chinese medicine, and long ago used ayurveda to recover from some gynecological surgeries. Our western medicine is run by pharmaceuticals, which are not interested inc ruing but in selling drugs they have spent a fortune on developing. Why else would they work so hard to make sure you don’t know there is a tea that can do what that $45 prescription does? Or that not eating ten foods will cure your arthritis? To be fair, however, most Americans do nto want to change their comfortable habits or to be told that the comfort food mom made which was fine for the other kids makes you sick because you ahve an allergy to the ingredients . . . they’d rather take a pill! I can see I need to write about thsi on my own blog when I get the chance — so much to say on this one.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I can see that you’re pretty well informed about Ayurveda. Most people here in India would go for simple natural home remedies that root from this science. We call it “Nuskha” pronounce it as “noos-kha”. I would also like to emphasize that many Indians these days prefer pills over these home remedies because pills react faster, although they might have side effects. American culture is quickly seeping into urban lifestyle here. I don’t say its bad, but when I see obese burger-hungry, coke-guzzling teens & kids at McDonalds & KFC, I don’t see a healthy picture of India. Yeah, I do visit McDonalds and KFC, but I’m not a daily customer at these places. India is already reeling with cultural clash of keeping the Eastern values and imbibing the Western culture. Am I making sense here?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. So much sense! The Chinese rarely had what we call arthritis until Mac’s showed up. I would stay away from ALL these places (we do, 100%) if I were you. I DO think it is bad and have tried wearily to get my nieces and nephews OFF this stuff. Those that are working in hospitals hear me and eat organic and try the things I recommend except when it is time to see an AMA doc — as in, surgery.

          Liked by 2 people

    2. I asked my wife (the person in this family who would know about such things) and she says that there are places where you can buy these products. I don’t know much about them but I’d be happy to learn more.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. You might think that a man like myself, who’s been all but shaving his folliclely-challenged head for years, would find nothing of value in this post. Au contraire! It’s made me even more grateful that I don’t have to worry about selecting the right shampoo, or worrying about whether the conditioner is included, or what kind of chemicals are in it. A bar of Ivory is all I need. So thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. My hair does weird things if I stay with one product too long. I tend to be brand loyal but I will rotate between varieties in that brand to keep my hair looking right. NB: the brand must fit into my budget so if the price rises beyond what I can afford I will find a more reasonable one.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. When you think about it, why do men and women need different shampoos? I mean, we all have hair. It’s not linked to the X or Y chromosome. It’s all about marketing and the scents they dump in them–nothing to do with the actual shampoo.

    Insanity.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Ah we have had this shampoo discussion before. Vidal Sassoon’s relatives are retired along the Riviera while my husband put me through hell for three years bemoaning the discontinuation of his products. Now the only shampoo he likes is my precious $30 a bottle salon product that used to last me forever. Ah well…in sickness , in health and product abandonment. 😀I feel your pain.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Oh stop! Im not laughing. Just mopping up the water I spewed when I read your comment. Lol no seriously I understand. My husband feels the same way. I never thought men cared so much or had difficulties with their hair like we do.

    Liked by 1 person

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