Thursday Doors–Closed

Gigi's
I’m not actually sure what they use this building for. The veggies are sold under the tent. Maybe this is the administration building.

The gutters have been cleaned, in advance of the last curbside pickup of leaf bags and the last Saturday that the town’s compost site was open. The garage has been flipped from workshop to, well, garage and two cars are now parked where projects rested on sawhorses a few weeks ago. Two cords of wood have been received and stacked by my editor (she insists on doing that job herself) and several other racks of firewood are seasoned and ready for the stove. We have had the first fire in the woodstove. The garden shed is in disarray but the snow blower will soon take center stage.

But these aren’t the only signs that winter is approaching.

Things are missing. Things have been moved. Those telltale seasonal items are out, and doors – are – closed.

Things that are missing include outdoor displays. Oh the hardware store might roll a snow blower out during open hours and there might be a pile of “one-night fire” firewood in the entry way at the grocery store, but storefronts are pretty bare. The seasonal displays, for those of you in the warmer climes, include 40 pound bags of salt, unfreezable windshield washer fluid and shovels of all shapes and sizes.

Of the doors that are closed, the one featured today is the saddest. Roadside farm stands are one of the first signs of summer and one of the happiest sights after a long winter without fresh vegetables. Yeah, the good farmers in Florida and California ship stuff to us, but truck-ripened tomatoes just don’t have the appeal of vine-ripened. Even if those vines are in a greenhouse. Those farm stands are offering locally grown tomatoes in June. By mid-June, they have added small cukes, peas and green beans. We are starting to see strawberries and we are thinking about corn.

Some of these businesses are big enough and diverse enough to stay open year-round or nearly so. These are the ones that sell other things to make your landscaping and hardscaping interesting. They are larger, they sell more stuff and they start to see customers in early spring. The true farm stands, the ones run by farmers, don’t have anything to offer until late May at best.

It’s OK. We can wait.

As is the case on every Thursday, this post is part of the recently-recognized-by-WordPress but longstanding amazing series brought to the world by Norm Frampton. Visit his site. Check out his door. Click on the blue-linky-thing and add your door or check out all the other doors.

66 thoughts on “Thursday Doors–Closed

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  1. I really like this down to earth, pun intended, natural source of delicious produce. Dan, I count on going to different places including walking downtown to get fresh fruits and vegetables at the farmers market from May until Labor Day on Saturdays. (Also, held on Wednesdays in the afternoon and late enough for working folks like me! :)
    You have a great editor snd your photographs were nice shots, too. Happy almost weekend, Dan. :)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Robin. I think farmers markets are a special thing in the north. It’s part of the “experiencing four seasons” we talk about. Each season has its ups and downs, but there’s always something to enjoy.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, I have bought flowers, pottery and candles from this group who show up, rain or shine. When I used to drive to my parents lake house I would stop and buy pies from a farm lady and fresh salad fixings. She also “made” honey. :)
        Smiles, Robin

        Liked by 1 person

  2. So, I’m not the only one who loses garage space in the summer to park my truck. Somehow my wife gets to keep hers but mine makes way for kid’s summer stuff.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. When I had a truck, it spent most winters outside since only half the garage was available. I force both cars out in the spring. A planned garage renovation should make that transition a little easier, but we’ll have to wait and see the results.

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  3. Some nice doors for a very good but somewhat sad theme this week Dan.
    We’re luck enough to have lots of roadside stands in our area too. They usually shut down for the season after our Thanksgiving weekend – I miss them already.
    But hey, spring is only 4 1/2 months away!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Dan, I really like your somewhat unusual take on the challenge this week and your musings as well. There’s a seasonal beauty and finality in both. We have a good farmer’s market in Naperville and had an even larger one when we lived in Cleveland. I was spoiled by the latter, as it went indoors during the winter, enabling me to still get all sorts of goodies, including wonderful apples. In Naperville, we now wait until June with great anticipation.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet. I drive by these doors about once a week. I see them closed and I remember when everything was open and you could see the veggies from the road. I don’t think we have a farmers market that’s open year round around here, at lease not one that’s easy to get to. Oh well, it won’t be too long.

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  5. That hut reminds me of the one I built in my woods. We lived in a small rural house at the time, so I built a lifeboat for our relationship. I ran electricity out there and put in heat and air conditioning. It was a great place to write.

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  6. A TINY HOUSE! A TINY HOUSE! ~dancing~ –Sorry. I’m a total geek for tiny houses. ANYWAY, yes, the closed doors of the seasonal bounty are sad. You and Norm have the right attitude, though: the time off helps us appreciate them more when they’re back. Around here, we have a couple of eateries that are only open in the summer: Polly’s Freeze (specializing in ice cream and fish sandwiches … er, fish sandwiches and ice cream), and AJ’s Gyros (specializing in Greek food and fish & chips). …Oh, and “hardscaping,” Gracie?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry about “hardscaping” that comes from watching too much “This Old House” – Yeah the ice cream place seems to be opening earlier, but last year, I was standing in snow to get my first frosty treat. Thanks again for dropping by and for the earlier mention.

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  7. I like these small doors, too, Dan, both front and back. Perhaps it’s because they’re small, or because they’re rounded. But it may also because the building itself is so small. I’ve always gotten a kick out of buildings that look like mini-houses. I half-expect a fairytale character to emerge from them!

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    1. It is like a mini-house. My daughter is fascinated with small houses. I can imagine her sizing this one up and wondering if it’s big enough for her and two cats. Thanks for the comment Paul.

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  8. I love the signs of winter coming. Yesterday was the first day I had to scrape the ice from Bonnie Blue, as well as the first day I wore my actual winter coat. Second snow :) Quite nice!
    I feel spoiled our local DQ is open year-round. (It didn’t usta be!)
    I love the arcs on the tiny shed — great doors!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I thing we have a DQ that is large enough to have some inside seating, that stays open year-round, but it’s pretty far away. This is a family run joint that has the best ice cream and always has at least one custom flavor (pistachio and coconut are the best). I love the doors on the little building. they look like they were made with such care. Thanks!

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  9. I love farmer’s markets and roadside stands. Even in California they close in the winter. In our small town the farmer’s market is a weekly cause for celebration – music, art, jugglers, fresh peaches, falafels, tamales, kids, dogs, old people – ah yes!

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  10. We are lucky here in California but we do ship our produce out and get produce shipped in here too which I think is crazy. The stores will buy from whoever is selling at the cheapest price. It would seem a bit bleak to see all the displays gone and not have any fresh produce. A sign of winter here, that I think is bleak, is when the trees lose all their leaves. They look forlorn to me.

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  11. The top little building would make a lovely artist studio, or reading room I think. Great selection of doors today. Our farmers market is still going, but if we have a wet winter I wonder if they’ll continue. Most the roadside stalls have closed for the season now here too in No. CA.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. LOVE these doors especially the ones on that small wooden building. What is it? I am just so curious about it … it has such personality. The green tarp is intriguing and you leave me wondering what is under it that folds out to 3 times it’s size. A stand? It has to be! As for the farmer’s stands being closed, yep same here, and yes it always gives me a sad feeling. Now we have something to look forward to …. SPRING!!! The Dairy Queen doors … nice, but I could care less to be honest ’cause I just don’t got there. No great loss for me.
    I LOVED the way you wrote this post. It just flowed and I could feel your “emotions” through the words. Oh, yes, sorry about the loss of your workroom. In our garage, which is a 2.5 car garage is parked just my car and a whole lot of “other”. A huge snowblower has taken the place of the huge wheel barrow. I went from bright blue to a bright orange … my eyes would rather see bright blue darn it! Oh well, thank goodness we do have a snowblower ’cause with some of the winte’s we’ve had, *shudder*, we wouldn’t have been able to get out of our driveway!
    Really enjoyed this one, my friend! Thank you!!! <3

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The little shed must hold some of the stuff they need to lock up at night. The green tarp will end up being part of the roof. I’ll get photos in the spring when they open. It’s quite large. I’m always amazed when it folds up so small. We don’t do ice cream often, but I like knowing that it’s there. Thanks for stopping by today Amy.

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  13. I’m a little too far north to see much in the way of fruit/vegetable stands even in the middle of summer, but your feature today is wonderful. I think the best word to describe that sweet little building is “quaint”. And omigosh, “decorative fires”! Wood is my ONLY heat source, so I have to admit, that made me chuckle! Great post, Dan. Now come on Spring!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to laugh at you thinking about people who buy enough wood for one fire at a supermarket and then light it during a party. I’ve given one of those to my wife for Christmas (tagged from the cats) as a hint to build a fire for MiMi. I won’t tell you how much it costs for six small split pieces of wood. I do like the little building. As I study the photo, I realize that it is a permanent structure, as it’s where their electrical connection is for the property. I’m guessing it meets certain minimal requirements in order to get that hook-up. Do you have any growing season for vegiies?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Aww, well, I definitely think that’s a sweet gift when you mark it from the cats. And I could certainly appreciate it if I had a central heating system AND a fireplace that I used on special occasions only. But I’ll admit that while I DO have aspirations to eventually enjoy a less labour intensive form of heat, I wouldn’t ever want to be completely without a wood stove. Last year my great grandparents antique cook stove received a place of honour in my kitchen, and I’ve actually been using it for more than just extra heat this winter. It got me thinking about how as long as you have a wood stove, it doesn’t matter if the power goes out in the middle of winter. If you’ve got wood? You’ve got heat. If you’ve got snow and a stove to heat it on? You’ve got water to drink, cook and clean with. Right now I live in the middle of no where, and I know what it’s like to be without any electricity for a week, unable to even leave your property. But even if I lived in a large city, stuff happens! If the power goes out, I don’t want to freeze. So (I’ll get to my point eventually here!) I want a wood stove no matter where I live. Just in case!

        As for veggies and the like, garden centers usually open in mid-May, and the farmer’s market around the end of June. When mid-September rolls around, it’s pretty much all over for the year. So I guess it’s not TOO bad, but, well, I think it could be a lot better. :(

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I am hoping that my wife doesn’t read this comment Wendy. I think she would love to have a wood-fired cookstove. Several years ago, we had a freak snow storm while the leaves were still on the trees. Limbs, big branches and entire trees came down on the power lines. We were without power for 10 days. She kept us warm with the woodstove and she managed to make coffee on it. She refuses to get a pellet stove, because they need electricity for the little auger that feeds the pellets in.

          My brother lives in Iowa. He says they have four seasons, “June, July, August and winter.” It sounds like that really does apply to you :)

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Ha, yes, that’s a pretty accurate description of up here too, Dan! And yes, the cookstove is SO nice. From what you’ve said about your wife in posts/comments, I think she’d definitely enjoy having one too. The only real downside (other than the huge amount of real estate that it takes up) is that it is a bit messy with the ash and smoke. You put the wood in from the top, so a lot of times when you open it up to add more — POOF!

            Liked by 1 person

  14. Supporting local farmers’ markets, and producers is the best, it would be great if we all could be more self-sufficient, rather than depending on imported fruit and vegetables from far off places.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We grow our own veggies in the summer and buy what we don’t grow from the locals. In the winter, we really cut back because the “produce” really doesn’t taste that good. Thanks for dropping by.

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    1. Fresh popcorn is such a treat. Even though we can (and do) make it at home, there’s something special about getting it from a popcorn stand. Sept 30 is so early :( Thanks for the comment.

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    1. Thanks Teagan. The Dairy Cream is family owned and such a wonderful little operation. They can have a line out to the street, but when you get to the window, they make you feel like you’re their first and best customer. It’s such a sign of spring when they put up the “Opening on ..” sign in the parking lot.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. I skimmed over your last 3-4 posts and I like this one the best! Maybe because is shows so much of what I weekly drive by to do groceries. Your approach to life reminds me on that I’m an expat from the Netherlands, then L.A. The last move, last year was actually harder, more of a culture shock than the first. Having said that, count on it that I’ll ask or comment that you think is off kilter (for the next 5 years or so).

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re probably more happy go lucky than I am, and did okay? – got into an argument the first week we were living here with a neighbor. I managed to save the situation by telling her that we were city people…

        Liked by 1 person

  16. I like this post because it urges me to shop local during warm months. As it seems there are there, there are lots and lots of farms here which sell yummy produce. It’s time to make the most of that wonderful community feature!

    Fondly,
    Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I for one will be at the ice cream shop the day it opens :) I know it’s not healthy, but I want to show them that we appreciate them. We tend to be regulars at the farm stand. Thanks for the comment Elizabeth.

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