Thursday Doors – Seattle Walk Personal

I've been trying to figure out the story behind these doors ever since I first saw them.
I’ve been trying to figure out the story behind these doors ever since I first saw them.

I’m gradually digging out from something that seemed like the flu and the chaos that it left behind where my week had been. In addition to having lots to do, I seem to still need about 23 hours of sleep a day.

Fortunately, when I was in Seattle, Washington last September, I took a few more door photos than I used. I wasn’t planning to use them. They were personal. They meant something to me. But, as I looked through them, I realized that, at least some of them are pretty cool doors.

I’ll start with the ones up to the right. I’ve been trying to look at the various clues and figure out the tortured history of those poor doors. Whenever anyone makes structural changes to a door, they usually damage the doors in the process. I think this is a good example.

The next group of photos are of an area that reminded me of my hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Western PA is very hilly, and Pittsburgh has some scary steep streets, including Canton Ave, allegedly the steepest street in the world. It was recently featured in this commercial for Audi. When I see buildings that were built to adapt to a hillside, it always makes me smile.

The next gallery includes a couple of doors that I saw a lot when I lived in Seattle. I was the junior guy on a four-person team of “Methods Analysts” – people who figure out better ways of doing stuff – at Airborne Freight. I was the new guy, but they gave me a cubicle by a window. It was the smallest one available, but on a clear day, I could waste some time looking onto Puget Sound. At lunch, I could easily walk to Seattle Center, home of the Worlds Fair in the 60s and home to the Seattle Armory, an Art Deco style building from the 1930s. From there, I could take the Monorail downtown. It made for a nice break in the day.

I’ll leave you with a couple of housekeeping items. First, this post is part of a fun series orchestrated by Norm Frampton. You will find a link on his door post that will take you to all the other doors and will also let you join us with a picture of one of your favorite/interesting/curious doors. Second, I passed my flu onto my editor, so any typos are 100% on me.

69 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Seattle Walk Personal

Add yours

  1. Glad you’re feeling better and sorry you shared with the Editor. Hope Maddie escaped. :-) I always like your Seattle doors because I like Seattle. But, I smiled at the first door thinking I would have liked to have been a fly on the wall the day they decided to do what they did to it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I was silently screaming in protest, while I looked at that. There had to be better options. Maddie has remained healthy (luck of the Irish I guess) but she’s bored. She wants us to play more than we can. We are rarely sick at the same time – I mean decades.

      Like

  2. Oh that’s too bad about your editor.
    I cannot imagine what happened to the red doors. They are rather peculiar.
    I enjoy the buildings rising from the hills, too :)
    Feel better, rest lots.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What an interesting set of doors. It does make you wonder what all happened through “progress” and time with the first door. And the buildings on steep hills-cool but wonder if its odd to walk out of them and bam, you are on a hill!
    Glad you are somewhat better!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. It always is s bit of a shock stepping out onto the sidewalk. Especially in Pittsburgh in the winter. I wouldn’t call what the red doors sent through “progress” but I’m sure there was a reason.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I can imagine the cold. I vaguely remember Ohio winters before I moved south. Brutal. Yeah, I am sure there was a reason. Now, whether or not it was a good reason is debatable.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Some eye-catching pics, Dan, as always. Good thing you kept some extras, even if you didn’t intend to use them.

    Ha, you talk about how having the flu made a mess of your week. I don’t doubt it, but it’s striking how little it really affected your blog. I know Monday’s post was delayed 12 hours or so, and you haven’t been as quick to reply … but sheesh, but that’s it. You still posted on your usual days, you’ve still been replying.

    In short, you’re more productive on your blog when you’re sick than the rest of us are when we’re well!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha – Jean, that made me smile. We’ll get her back wielding that red pen soon. Makers does seem like a cool place. I wish there had been some signs of life the day I was there, I’d love to know more about it.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. The only good news is that maybe, we caught hers in time for the meds to be effective. Those eagles are stunning. I wish ?I had had time to look into the history more., I’m wondering if, in the 30s, that was the front entrance. Today, that entrance is on a back-alley kind of walkway. The front of the building faces the Space Needle but is rather bland.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. They would be a lovely front entrance. I thought they’d be a great entrance to a theater as well.

        That’s good news about your wife being able to get meds to help her get over the flu quicker. I’ve read it’s been a nasty flu this season. I forgot to get my shot this year too.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. It’s funny that you say theater. When you go in that entrance, there are large circular staircase on each side of the lobby. It feels like you entered a theater.

          She hasn’t been this sick in 20 years. I hope the meds work their magic.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. My favorites of your captures are on the second row, both of them. The right one is similar to Deborah’s door:) And I love the look of the stairs outside the building in your left capture! I know the feeling, of being happy, having taken more shots at one time than was necessary.:) :) Get some more rest, friend.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Ugh! Getting sick in the spring always seems to feel worse. Sleep seems to be the thing you need the most!

    I really like interesting buildings made to conform with their environment. This one is a great example. I start to visualize what it must look like from the inside.
    I also really like the huge stylized eagles flanking the doors at the Armory. I don’t really know or pretend to understand architecture in any form, but if this is Art Deco, I like it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne. I’m guessing Art Deco based on the metal and the doors. It was very popular in 20s and 30s but not after WWII. When you’re in those buildings, you have to adjust your thinking. My one-level apartment in West Virginia was on the street level at the front door but back at our kitchen, we were on the third floor! I have been sleeping so much this week, it’s weird.

      Like

  7. Some unusual buildings today, Dan! I can honestly say that I’ve never seen a building that was built around (or into, if you prefer) a hillside. That green and white door that’s lacking steps down from it is just screaming for someone to paint scenes in the panels. And I’m very partial to the decorative brickwork of the YWCA.

    You’re making me grateful that I have such limited in-person contact with other people. I hardly ever get sick anymore. Wishing speedy recoveries all around!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A LONG time I stared at those hills doors. The architecture and how the buildings and doors are built to accommodate the hill. That long building built into the hill is so cool the way the windows get smaller and smaller as the hill gets higher. You don’t see that every day. You honestly go to some pretty cool places, Dan. Pondered a long time looking at the first red door trying to get a take at its story. Poor thing. And as for your editor, my empathy. This fever thing is really tough not only to get through but the after effects. I’m still struggling, sorry, but that is true. I don’t seem able to put the weight back on I lost. Too much of thin is not a good thing. Honest. My prayers are with you and your editor. <3

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Amy. The building on/in the hill really caught my attention for a while. Those red doors, they’re just sad. I want to set up shop and rebuild them and yell at every person who helped them get into this state.

      The editor is gradually getting better. Still not spending much time on her feet. I feel bad for bringing this home.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Truly t’is not your fault if a bug is catchy. I’m thankful hubby did not catch the bug I had, or at least not to the extent I had it. Two of us down for the count would have been a national disaster in this house. :) Lots of water for the both of you. Please. <3

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet. When I first took my daughter to Pittsburgh, I drover her along my favorite bike route. She said “now I know why the hills in CT don’t bother you.” If you didn’t learn to turn your wheels into the curb when you park, you didn’t have enough hills.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I remember driving in San Francisco in my VW Superbeetle, worrying about rolling back or, maybe worse, killing it while trying to get up a “hill.” However, I survived that, as well as living in the Rockies for a few years, and now living northern Illinois, in the Great Plains, it’s not a problem!

        Liked by 1 person

  9. As usual, you have a nice assortment of doors. I love the building on the steep street, although it would have been fun if they could have built it on the angle of the street and somehow made the floors level. It’s almost the end of the week, Dan…you can catch up on your sleep soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I finally caved in and took some sick time Mary. I feel like all I’ve done lately is sleep. I hope/think/pray I am getting better. Building the building at an angle might have been cool. I’m trying to imagine that :)

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I really liked the private collection of Dan Antion. One of my favorite architecture and design styles is art deco, so I enjoyed the Seattle Armory. Look at the gold painted framework and the chiseled lettering. The post was choxk full of cool details, unique doors and incredible stories sprinkled throughout. The work doors you passed through for years were framed with shady Doors, so lovely. :)

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I, too, enjoy wandering around Seattle, and it has been too long since I’ve done so. Thanks for the memories. The abused red double doors fascinated me. What and why and when, for Pete’s sake. I’m guessing it was a matter of function over form. Hope you’re back to normal by now.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m late for the discussion but better late than never. I loved the entire post, but that building built into a hill reminded me of my second apartment here in Vasai, not too far from where I now live. When I visited Vasai in 1995, there was a small hill, when I came here in 2005 the hill was replaced by 25 new apartment buildings. It was a great calm place, but later we found it was eerie as well – sort of Into the Woods. I like the Makers building seems perfect for me.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. No stories, except that since the area was isolated there were many murders and suicides happening around. As I used to work till late, I walk those streets all alone, but never saw any ghosts, so far. Speaking of which, have you ever experienced any paranormal activity in your lifetime?

        Liked by 1 person

Add your thoughts. Start or join the discussion. Sadly, links require moderation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: