Poetry and Me

Mythology

This book was a struggle for me, but I’m glad I read it.

I have been transparent about the fact that I like poetry. I follow a number of poets, and I’ve hinted about an interesting (to me) relationship with poetry in several other posts. I’ve mentioned in several comments, that I might explain the connection at some point, and I’ve been encouraged to do so. Yes, I’m spreading the blame around for this post.

I won’t go into the backstory, because I’ve told it before, but I was forced to take 6 extra credits of English, in a deal struck between my advisor in Chemistry and the head of the English department at West Virginia University. The only courses that fit the assignment and my schedule were Poetry 200 and 201.

When I took my seat on the first day of class, one thing was apparent – I was an outcast. I was a transfer student. My slide rule identified me as the nerd that I was. These English majors all knew each other, and a couple of quick looks, transmitted and received, thank you, were enough to communicate that I was not part of, nor welcome in their little group. I felt like I was back in 7th grade.

A few minutes later, the professor walked in and began class in the most uninspiring manner. You would never have guessed that this was the first day of Fall Semester. No “welcome back”, no, she stoically began to call the role. She paused after mispronouncing my name:

Mr. Anty-on (spelled phonetically, the way she always said it) it says here that you are a chemistry major.”

Yes, that’s correct.”

Oh my, I’ve never had a chemistry major take this class. Tell me, what made you decide to take poetry?

OK, I had two choices. Tell her about the deal to allow me to skip freshman English even though I failed the exemption exam. Or, stretch of the truth a bit.

I have always had in interest in poetry; the course fit my schedule, so here I am.

Really, a scientist with an interest in poetry. Tell me Mr. Anty-on, who is your favorite poet?

I hadn’t though this through. My favorite poet was Edgar Allen Poe, but I thought, if I said that, it might sound trite, because, who hadn’t read Poe. So, I use the only other poet I knew well, which probably did sound trite, because of the sex and stuff.

I really like E. E. Cummings.”

Why is that? I’m sorry class, but this is such an unusual event, to have a non-English major in this course, I’m intrigued.”

I like his spontaneity and the way he uses visual elements in addition to words to convey his message.”

You see, I figured that question was coming, and I had read E. E. Cummings’ poetry for an assignment in high school. I used that line in my report and I received a good grade from another old, unmarried, seemingly somewhat jaded English teacher. I hoped it would work again. And, it did.

It worked, but it had the unfortunate side-effect of widening and deepening the chasm between me and my classmates. I remained an outcast. I sat off to the professor’s right, several rows up the amphitheater style room, while the English majors sat up front and left of center. It wasn’t my choice, as with everything I’ve ever been to in my life, I was usually the first to arrive. I – was – being – avoided.

We spent the first three weeks studying Mythology. On the exam for that section, the professor included an essay question, asking for our thoughts on Mythology. Unable to piece together a cogent response, I wrote about how I was surprised to find new meaning in poetry that I had read before. I mentioned “Night’s Plutonian shore” in Edgar Alan Poe’s “The Raven” as an example.

Not only was she impressed, but the next day, she read my essay to the class. The chasm was now a virtual Grand Canyon. I overheard a comment about “getting an ‘A’ for being ignorant…” and I thought:

Screw you, let’s see how well you do on that Organic Chemistry test tonight. I doubt Dr. McDowell will be holding up your paper as being insightful…jackass.”

When I returned to that class in January, the professor was ecstatic to see me. I had never been a teacher’s pet before, but I owned this class. The chasm was still there, upper right, lower left, and we continued from where we had left off in December.

Shortly after mid-terms, we were given our final assignment. We were to complete a critical study of one poet. I would have loved to have revisited Poe, but without pausing for breath, the professor looked at me and said: “I’m sure Mr. Anty-on will be choosing E. E. Cummings.”

Despite the fact that I had several other classes, difficult classes, science classes, I worked my butt off on that paper.

Without Thinking

By E. E. Cummings

If she had asked me to name my favorite E. E. Cummings poem, I would have chosen this one. My editor might not be surprised. Perhaps the fact that I do like this poem, explains, or supports why I like Stream of Consciousness Saturday. If I have that all wrong, whatever, remember I was a chemistry major.

 

 

 

About Dan Antion

Husband, father, woodworker, cyclist, photographer, geek - oh wait, I’m writing this like I only have 140 characters. I am all those things, and more, and all of these passions present me with opportunities to observe, and think about things that I can’t write about in other places. I have started this blog to catch the stuff that falls out, overflows and just plain doesn’t fit the other containers in my life.
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89 Responses to Poetry and Me

  1. Jill's Scene says:

    Right there with you, Dan, in that auditorium! Brilliant post – you make me want to read more poetry!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks! I hope you’re sitting upper-right Jill, I could use some good company :) There are a lot of people tangled up in my comments and likes who are very good poets. I still like reading the stuff that has stood the test of time, but I like reading modern poets too.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jill's Scene says:

        I have once or twice attempted to learn Keats’ Ode On A Grecian Urn by heart, wihout success. And apart from that I have one other favourite poem, actually favourite stanza: ” Not I, some child, born in a marvelous year,
        Will learn the trick of standing upright here.”
        It’s from The Skeleton of the Great Moa in the Canterbury Museum, Christchurch by Allan Curnow. Obscure in your part of the world I expect, less so down here where it’s famous … well … famous as far as poetry goes. Just in case you’re interested: The entire poem is at this link:
        “http://nzpoems.blogspot.co.nz/2011/04/skeleton-of-great-moa-in-canterbury.html
        Moas were huge flightless birds that were quite common in New Zealand until two or three hundred years ago.
        Based on all that and the fact that I didn’t study English at Uni, a big regret now but wasn’t for several decades, I’d say there’s only one place for me in the auditorium, Dan, and that’s the upper-right, where the most interesting people already hang out.

        Like

        • Dan Antion says:

          Thanks Jill :) I’ll have s look at that poem later. I always enjoy reading things that are recommended. My daughter had to learn The Raven for an English class in high school. I think she can still recite it.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve always wished I had a talent for poetry… but I’ve none at all. Except when it happens by accident… which is rather strange. ;) Have a marvelous Monday, Dan. Mega hugs.
    PS: May is “Get Caught Reading Month” (a public service thing to encourage people to read). Maybe you can do some poetry for that… Just a thought. I’m doing a crazy story for it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Get Caught Reading Month? Who knew? I’ll have to think about that. I tried writing poetry o couple of times. I don’t think it’s my strength, but I enjoy reading it. Have a great week, Teagan!

      Like

  3. Poetry is not my thing, but I have been amazed for years how popular it is in the blogosphere. It’s big. I loved your story. Those other students just didn’t realize who they were challenging. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Judy. Poetry is big, at least on WordPress, and it’s big in the list of people I follow. I said, in one of those almost-poetry posts, that poets work on getting every word right. I really appreciate that.

      I had an edge over those other students, and I took advantage of it. When I think back on high school and college, I remember my English teachers, even though it was never my best subject. Those two women stand out in that group.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. joey says:

    I love poetry. I read a lot of it here on WordPress. I’m hard-pressed to pick traditional favorites, but I will say that like music, my favorite poets seem to span a wide variety. Whitman and Ginsberg, Keats and Cummings — and don’t forget Silverstein…who could pick favorites?
    I took chemistry as an English major, but I think most everyone in that class needed a physical science, so there was no isolation. I loved that class. My prof blew something up every Friday. :)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      You’re right Joey, who can pick a favorite. I can’t even really pick a favorite poem by most poets. I don’t think an English major would have stood out in general chemistry or even Organic, because so many people had to take those courses. By the way, most of us who stayed in Chemistry, stayed for the explosions ;)

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Almost Iowa says:

    It would never fly in a college poetry class but my favorite poet is Ogden Nash. Poetry does not get better than this.

    “It is common knowledge to every schoolboy and even every Bachelor of Arts,
    That all sin is divided into two parts.
    One kind of sin is called a sin of commission, and that is very important,
    And it is what you are doing when you are doing something you ortant,
    And the other kind of sin is just the opposite and is called a sin of omission
    and is equally bad in the eyes of all right-thinking people, from
    Billy Sunday to Buddha,
    And it consists of not having done something you shuddha.
    I might as well give you my opinion of these two kinds of sin as long as,
    in a way, against each other we are pitting them,
    And that is, don’t bother your head about the sins of commission because
    however sinful, they must at least be fun or else you wouldn’t be
    committing them.
    It is the sin of omission, the second kind of sin,
    That lays eggs under your skin.
    The way you really get painfully bitten
    Is by the insurance you haven’t taken out and the checks you haven’t added up
    the stubs of and the appointments you haven’t kept and the bills you
    haven’t paid and the letters you haven’t written.
    Also, about sins of omission there is one particularly painful lack of beauty,
    Namely, it isn’t as though it had been a riotous red-letter day or night every
    time you neglected to do your duty;
    You didn’t get a wicked forbidden thrill
    Every time you let a policy lapse or forget to pay a bill;
    You didn’t slap the lads in the tavern on the back and loudly cry Whee,
    Let’s all fail to write just one more letter before we go home, and this round
    of unwritten letters is on me.
    No, you never get any fun
    Out of things you haven’t done,
    But they are the things that I do not like to be amid,
    Because the suitable things you didn’t do give you a lot more trouble than the
    unsuitable things you did.
    The moral is that it is probably better not to sin at all, but if some kind of
    sin you must be pursuing,
    Well, remember to do it by doing rather than by not doing.

    Ogden Nash

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks. It’s appropriate, since that’s kinda what I did in that class. I had always been interested in poetry, but I left the part about failing the exam out. Well, you know, it just didn’t come up in conversation :)

      Like

  6. Ruth says:

    Great post Dan, but I’ve just realised I’ve also been mis-pronouncing your name in my head for the last year or so… so if it’s not ‘Anty-on’ how exactly DO you say it??? :-)

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dan Antion says:

      Ha – Ruth, you and everyone else in the world, even some in our extended family. I am on the side of the family that says “Anton” while others insist on it being “Antin” – Nobody wants to include both th ‘i’ and the ‘o’. Nobody seems to really know why both letters are there or what it was when (well, shortly before) my grandparents landed at Ellis Island. We were told that it was changed during that process.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ruth says:

        My great uncle’s surname was spelled wrong on his birth certificate, so all his descendents have by law carried on his ‘official’ name while all his antecedents have it spelled differently :-)

        Liked by 1 person

        • Dan Antion says:

          That’s funny. My middle name is my maternal grandfather’s name. His name was in the wrong order on his birth certificate and my mother briefly suggested that we should change my middle name to ‘Gustav’ – Fortunately, I was an adult when they discovered that error.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. I love poetry. The romantics, and nature poets pull me in. Mary Oliver is my favorite poet. She articulated with words what I feel about so much of nature, and life, but never can find the words myself. I travel with her works a lot. She’s a wonderful travel companion.
    Byron, Shelly, Shakespeare, Rume, Whitman, Wordsworth and Frost are my fall back poets. I’ve really enjoyed finding new, modern poets here on WordPress.

    Did your classmates never come around? Stuck-up idiots!

    I’ve been pronouncing your last name with a French accent. It looks like it’s French, but what do I know?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Deborah. My class mates never came around, but I continued to treated as a most favored nation, so I guess I can’t blame them. The professor had a bad reputation, so only English majors too the course. I had better luck with American Lit, because it attracted a much broader audience. My paternal grandparents moved here from Syria, very close to 1900. Many people guess that our name is French. We’re a pretty mixed bag now.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. C.E.Robinson says:

    Dan, nice to know more about your talents! Poetry was a favorite. I started writing poetry back in the 70s. Published a few behavioral health based poems. Completely switched to writing fiction and non- fiction in the 80s, mostly university course and degree related. Fast forward to retirement these past three years…writing books and editing screenplays. Not much interest in writing poetry, however I enjoy reading it. Love e.e. cummings! Have a 1968, Poems 1923-1954, First Complete Edition. Happy week! 💛 Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Elizabeth. I tried writing poetry a couple of times, but it’s a little too much work for me to boil large complex thoughts down to a few words. I work really hard to stay under 1,000 words on these posts (my goal is under 800). You must treasure that book of poetry. I can’t find the small book of his poems that I bought to complete that assignment. It’s funny, I kept all my chemistry books, and now those are the ones I wish I had left behind.

      Liked by 2 people

      • C.E.Robinson says:

        Funny, I have all the poetry books I bought years ago, and threw out the old medical books! (old info after a few years anyway). But those poetry books are treasures. I also have a small paperback, e.e cummings – a selection of poems, 1965 (yellowed with age). Your favorite poem is in the hardback book, not the paperback. 💛 E

        Liked by 1 person

  9. loisajay says:

    Dan–you scared me for a minute with Edith Hamilton. That book was required reading for Freshman English and I was not a fan. But then you did right with ee cummings. He was wonderful. And talk about fake it till you make it. Dang! You did good–your teacher had a gem of a student.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I’m sorry about the scare, Lois. The book still gives me nightmares, but I have reread it once in my adult life. This ended up being one of my favorite classes, if for no other reason than she showered me with attention. she graded hard, I didn’t get any special treatment. but she always wanted to know “what the scientist” thought – no wonder the other students didn’t like me :)

      Glad to find another E E Cummings fan.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Norm 2.0 says:

    I follow a few poets on here too and have always had an appreciation, though not a very good understanding of, different styles, rules, and structure.
    To me a good turn of a phrase is a good turn of a phrase regardless of the format. One of these days I may just go back and take a course to understand it all a little better.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I did find the course helpful in that regard, Norm, but I don’t remember a lot of it. Some of the poets I follow are kind enough to explain some of the nuances from time to time. I agree with you that it doesn’t really matter how you get your message across. Sometimes, all you need is a photo.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. marianallen says:

    Robert Francis is probably my favorite poet. He was a contemporary of Robert Frost.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. What a great post and I love the way the teacher drew you into the class. Makes me want to read more e.e.cummings. Wonderful poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I adore poetry, so thanks for sharing Cummings’ poem. Nice way to start the week.
    The teacher’s excitement, so darling. Nothing like an excited academic to make a class fun, the student determined.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Good for you, you chemistry rebel, you! I’m a poetry lover as well. I like e.e. as well as many others and I like poetic prose as well. Mary Oliver is my current new favorite as she writes beautifully about nature.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Janet. I’ve read a lot of Mary Oliver’s poems., many in blog posts by other poetry lovers. I’m not sure I remember much from that class, other than the fact that anyone can enjoy poetry.

      Like

      • Dan, I’ve read hers online, too. The funny thing is that a year or so ago, I sought permission to use one of her poems on my website (or part of one, I can’t remember) and was told I couldn’t use it. I don’t think it was from her, but from her publisher. I guess because her poetry’s not in the public domain but still under copyright.

        Yes, anyone can enjoy poetry. I love Dr. Seuss poetry as well as more classical poetry. :-)

        Liked by 1 person

  15. bikerchick57 says:

    Well, my question has been answered on how one really pronunciates your name. However, I want to know if any of the automated messages you received (pharmacy, doctor’s office, etc.) get it right. They tend to murder my last name.

    I didn’t know you had an interest in poetry. Awesome. I think you should throw something out there once in a while, just to keep us on our toes. Maybe write an “if we were having a beer” in rhyme.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I love it, I love it, I love it! I thoroughly enjoyed reading this post, Dan. You certainly got the teacher to rethink her “boxing” of students who take her class. I bet she talked about the chemistry major student who gave her English major students a different perspective!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. joannesisco says:

    Well, I would never have guessed a science major with a passion for poetry!

    I admit that poetry kind of makes my eyes glaze over. I’m such a literal person, I usually just don’t *get” the fuzziness of the message in a typical poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Peter Nena says:

    I also read Poe. I have The Complete Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe. I like The Raven, Bells, Lenore, and Annabel Lee.
    In 2011, I bought The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 2nd Edition. It has some truly rich poetry and fiction. I have read them over and over again. The likes of Butler Yeats, William Blake, Rossetti, Eliot, Keats, Shelly, Byron, etc, to name a few.
    But almost all of those poems are rhymed and punctuated. Nevertheless, I was inspired me to write my own poem. “I said a Prayer” it was called. But I rhymed it, and one reader remarked that rhyming is so old school. I noticed later on that modern poems hardly possess the stylistic devices employed in the old ones: metaphors, synecdoche, hypophora, alliteration, allusion, antithesis, etc. For me, those styles made poetry quite enjoyable.
    So I got discouraged thinking that there’s no longer an audience for, say, an arcane poem like T.S. Eliot’s, or Poe’s rhymed The Raven, Bells, etc.
    I love old literature. They had something we lost along the way.

    Like

    • Dan Antion says:

      The poetry that I wrote, also rhymed, also labeled old school, but I also love the old school poets. Annabel Lee is one I knew by heart at one point. We have lost something, but we still have it, too. Thanks Peter.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I recently bought a book that tells the stories of twelve soldier poets of WW1 called ‘Anthem for Doomed Youth’ and their poetry gives the reader a very good perspective that history books often lack. The emotional aspect really comes through in verse and even some of their drawings and letters are reproduced in this book. Between reading that and your post, it’s made me want to get back into writing poetry again but as you say, it takes a lot of time and energy – both of which I’m lacking these days.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Glynis Jolly says:

    I doesn’t surprise me that someone immersed in science would like poetry. I am bewildered by the thought that a college instructor would be though. Is it a case of the university being in the eastern US verses the western region? At the University of Colorado, which is known for its science department, a student who can be diversified in both the sciences and arts, if only just starting out no less, has always been applauded. My brother, who is just three years younger than me, loves literature almost as much as he loves his science.

    I was true to my era when I was a teenager, writing free verse poems of protest. As you may guess, my favorite poet is Walter Whitman. (Or did you think it would be Bob Dylan?) Edgar Allen Poe takes on the second slot. I’ve gotten away from poetry. I just prefer the proses. What can I say?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I think it was more a case of non-English majors not taking this particular course. The professor was widely known for being difficult. I didn’t know that, thanks to being a transfer student, but it wouldn’t have mattered. This truly was the only course I could take that would fulfill that obligation during my sophomore year, and there were no opportunities after that, given the lab requirements of an upper class chemistry major. I took American Lit for the “normal” English or Core-A requirements.

      The English majors were upset with the notion of having to take that class, and my pretending to have wanted to be there wasn’t helping my cause.

      Whitman, or Dylan are good choices. Protesting is something that lends itself to poetry quite well, I think.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. If asked I’d say I don’t like poetry much. But then, I love Kenneth Patchen and Mary Oliver and Walt Whitman and Archibald MacLeish and even a bit of Robert Louis Stevens, so I guess it depends….

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Aren’t enough words in a poet’s heart to express how much I enjoyed your post, Dan. Lovely reading more about your poetic journey …for the love of poetry. Your favorite poem is by my favorite poet and also a poem I’ve enjoyed reading over the years. Seems you make a fine student and the poetry world is lucky to have you.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I have not read a lot of poetry. If I do read it I like the kind that is pretty straight forward without all the obtuse references. I would hope very much that a college English class would not be like what you have described in present times. What a bunch of dried up snobs. You poor kid. The teacher really wasn’t much better either. Never had a Science major in her class, ha!, there was obviously a reason for that. I am glad you sailed through it all with flying colors. I wonder what those English majors are doing today? They probably already dried up like dead leaves and blew away! Callooh, Callay!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Deborah. I looked up the current schedule. There seems to be only one undergraduate poetry class now. This woman was well known as being a hard professor and not being much fun. Other than me, it seemed that no one took her class if they didn’t have to. It was an interesting class. I didn’t expect to learn much, but I did.

      Liked by 1 person

      • What bugs me is the judgment the teacher and the English majors made about you. They certainly lacked imagination. Why shouldn’t you have an interest and ability in poetry. If someone is open to trying new and different things, I think they should be applauded and encouraged. I am glad you stuck it out and discovered your own latent talent and appreciation of poetry. :)

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Poetry is everything. I don’t understand how one can say “I don’t like poetry”. Well done, teacher’s pet. :)

    Liked by 1 person

  25. dweezer19 says:

    You are an amazingly diverse intillect Dan. E.E. Cummings is one poet I have not had much exposure to. Poe, I love.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. dweezer19 says:

    We do what we must.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Wendy Brydge says:

    I wouldn’t really consider myself a fan of poetry in general, but of course you get props from me for mentioning Poe, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

  28. reocochran says:

    Dan, I was very impressed at how you won the professor over with true interest and understanding. I still have my Dad’s U of Cincy slide rule in a leather case and the old time Bearcat. If I could think of a subject where it might fit in, I could take a picture and post about something. (Engineering and higher level math are out of my league!) My last husband went to WVU for two years then joined the Air Force. When my youngest wanted to see several universities she included Ohio University and WVU. They had a wonderful road trip checking those two out. I took her up to BGSU but it is flat and they didn’t “court” her. Where she found really nice people, Cross Country asst. coach gave her individual attention, sorority visit and young student guide assigned to the 3 of us, was at University of Dayton. Of course, we are glad she went there. :)
    I liked poetry while growing up. My Mom said they expected a lot of poetry memorization in her elementary years in school. She can still recite poems from those years. I think good poetry is “musical.” I entered two H.S. Spanish declamation (poetry) contests and did well with my second time with “La Higuera,” the fig tree. I remember my Spanish teacher (Señor Donaldson) showing me how to be dramatic which may have created my third place trophy. I like to write thoughts “with flair” but don’t like to rhyme or create certain amount of words or syllables.
    Pablo Neruda, Robert Louis Stephenson and Elizabeth Browning are interesting poets. I have a post with Joyce Keats coming up and when researching dates of birth and death, I found out “Joyce” was a man’s name long ago. Here I had thought for years, the poet was a woman! :) I took tons of Lit classes and loved 19th and 20th century novel courses.

    Like

    • Dan Antion says:

      Your writing might count as poetry today, Robin. I’m not one to categorize stuff other than “I like” and “I don’t like”. I like road trips of almost any kind.

      Like

  29. Aunt Beulah says:

    I’m sorry I had to abandon my computer for several days, and as a result missed this post WHICH I LOVED!, and, no, I’m not given to hyperbole. I wanted to read your poetry story; now I have, and it’s as entertaining as I thought it would be. I, an elementary education major, wandered into an advanced English Literature course as an elective. the first day the teacher asked everyone for their major. I was the only class member who was not and English major. The air around me cooled. I don’t remember what we were reading, but one day the teacher asked, “What does the exclamation Zounds mean?” Silence. Then, “Come on, English majors, you should know this,” at which point I found my voice: “It’s a contraction of God’s wounds.” Score!!! Years before, my mom, a reader, had given me that bit of information, and I managed to dredge it up.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thank you Janet. I am so glad you enjoyed this, and, although I’m sorry about your experience, I’m glad there’s someone who can relate. As for that response, Score One for the Visiting Team!

      Like

  30. Paul says:

    I can’t claim to be any special expert on poetry, Dan. (I’m sure Henry Bemis from “Time Enough at Last” would be shocked to hear it.) But I’ve always enjoyed the classics, at least — from Longfellow and Shelley to, yes, Poe and Cummings. It’s a shame poetry is so little read today.

    Ha, I had to smile when I saw you mention Cummings. I didn’t know the poem you quoted here, but I remember learning “In Just” in a high-school lit class. I can still hear my teacher reading it aloud to show how it was written in a certain way to ensure that you got the cadence of it just right.

    That’s great that you got to be “teacher’s pet” and show those clowns a thing or two. Good post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Paul. I still want an episode of TZ where all the nasty wives get there comeuppance. It’s funny, the teachers we remember and the reasons we remember them. I was happy to be the teacher’s pet.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. spreadingutp says:

    Glad you stuck it out. It’s better to be a rebel anyways!!!! No one likes to follow the norm in fact your teacher subconsciously was trying to get them to live a little… you did that. it’s no wonder your fav E.E. Cummings poem is what is!!! Keep living outside the box and keep finding “interest” in Poetry… it suits you!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. poperi says:

    This story was darn cute. Don’t you know Chemists make the best poets? Oops no, that’s Potions, they make the best potions, sorry ; ) But, do try your hand at writing poetry, seeing as how your stories are so enjoyable! ~ Peri

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Mathematical and scientific minds often seem to go well with music and poetry in the end! Loved this post, I would love to see you write some poetry, and shamelessly plug my own… do take a look at my blog if you fancy!

    Like

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