Thursday Doors – Bourbon Street Doors

Wooden Doors
Tough Duty

I should add “Part-1 of (n)” because I took so many pictures that I wouldn’t dare put them all out here today. I haven’t yet solved for (n), but I have a plan. I need to do some research before I know if the plan will come to fruition.

I was in New Orleans last week. It was only my second time in the city, but I knew that if I wanted to get photos of doors on Bourbon Street, I needed to get out in the morning. I left my hotel room at 6:45 am, for a 15 minute walk. My strategy had a few flaws:

A lot of the doors were hidden behind hurricane shutters. Still, some of those are nice, and I think the buildings are amazing, albeit, when you get up close, many are in serious need of some TLC.

The sidewalks were often blocked by trash bins.

The sidewalks were sticky, and I really don’t want to know why. I’m going to assume – beer.

I was trying to avoid trying to take photos between customers entering, exiting and standing, but I didn’t realize that deliveries would be happening early.

I’ve curated a group of doors today that fall into the category described by the title. I have a few doors that I think I can dredge up enough history on that I can feature by themselves, and I have enough photos of non-Bourbon street doors to fill at least one other post.

New Orleans is an amazing city. There is a ton of history between the lake and the river, and more than enough places to eat and drink. The combined French-Spanish-Pirates-&-thieves-Creole-Voodoo and just plain southern heritage lends a rich and risqué element to almost everything.

Bourbon St
I think that counts as a door.

Visiting New Orleans, both times, I was warned about the dangers of the city. I can say that I was out pretty early for these photos. I was also out mid-day and late at night. Well, my late night, not New Orleans late night. I’m not really sure where New Orleans late night ends and whether it’s before or after when my early morning begins, but I’m sure it’s after my late-while-traveling bedtime. I met a lot of locals. Most were nice, and the odd ones weren’t any odder than the odd folks in Hartford, Boston or New York. I had a chance to talk to some local folk on the plane, at a bar, in a restaurant and they all seemed like wonderful people.

I was in New Orleans for an Information Management convention. Event activities began early and ran late. Given the above-mentioned late-night considerations, I didn’t actually spend a lot of time doing touristy things in the city. Although no doors are involved, I did participate in one New Orleans tradition that I thought was pretty cool. It turns out that anyone can have a parade in NOLA. The organization that I belong to, AIIM International, had a parade. About 800 infoGeeks gathered in front of our hotel and followed a police escort and a marching band around the block and into the event party.

Enjoy the photos in the gallery. This post, and those photos are part of Norm Frampton’s energetic series called Thursday Doors. If you want to participate, or if you just want to see more cool doors, hop on over to Norm’s page. Check out his door(s) and click the blue linky thing.

80 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Bourbon Street Doors

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  1. I love New Orleans, especially the French Quarter – my in-laws used to live there before Hurrican Katrina trashed their house. Hope you had coffee and beignets at Cafe du Monde on Decatur Street! :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ruth. On a second walking trip through the French Quarter, I did enjoy coffee and beignets. You can still see signs of the damage caused by Katrina. it’s very sad to hear those stories. The city seems to have mostly recovered, but I only saw a very small portion.

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    1. Thanks Judy. I’m glad you like them. I’m sure New Orleans has seen stranger people marching in a parade, but I haven’t. I think I like the ironwork more than the doors. At some point, I’ll share some better pictures of that. This trip inspired a bunch of posts, but I need to set it aside for a while.

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  2. It was just a few days ago, I was having a conversation with Cheryl about this place. I have seen this street in so many Hollywood movies from The Pelican Brief to Now You See Me. I would love to visit this street and have some conversation with you and Cheryl and other friends over a beer, uh, I guess if Sarah is along then probably I would go with non-alcoholic drinks. By the way, what do you mean when you say ”dangers of the city”?

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    1. That sounds like a good time, but in my experience, we would have to be shouting to have a conversation. There are parts of New Orleans that have a pretty high crime rate. I have never experienced more than somewhat aggressive panhandling, and even that, I could easily walk away from. You can find those sections anywhere in America. You have to be a little streetwise when traveling.

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  3. Wow – so many of those doors are battered and worn – especially the water damage along the bottom.
    I am a fan of rounded architectural features, so the building with the wrap-around balcony would have to be my favourite… although I sure wouldn’t want to be responsible for maintaining all that intricate wrought-iron work.

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    1. I probably could have filled a Doors post with damaged doors. Many of the buildings need some extensive repairs. I did see a few contractors working in the wee hours of the morning. Having had a cabinet shop, I know how bar/restaurant owners want contractors in after closing time and out before lunch.

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  4. Love em all. So much history and lovely decorative architecture there. It has been almost 20 years since I was there – this post sooo makes me want to go back. Great shots Dan – that tall faded-green one is my fave :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Norm. I do like the faded/weathered doors and I love the ironwork. I took so many pictures, I could franchise Thursday Doors like they did NCIS – Thursday Doors – NOLA edition :)

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Dan, I like the bright blue colored shutters which may or may not be cerulean! I like the brick, with the very first weathered door. My trip to New Orleans is probably next 2 years, my college girlfriend lives in Long Beach, she says an hour or so to get to New Orleans. Take care and happy Thursday! :)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you found something to like, Robin. I can’t get too particular with color names, as I don’t see a lot of the ones you see. I’m working with a small box of crayons :)

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  6. “Rich and risqué element” … “Large and loud entrance” … enjoying the alliteration in today’s post, Dan. (Typical editor — starts with that and not the point of the post, the doors.) I’m guessing the spirit of New Orleans inspired you! Great collection of doors, of course. Funny how, despite the variety, a certain structural similarity emerges when you look at them long enough. As for power-washing, ha, I imagine that’s essential for a place famous for overindulgence. Looking forward to future installments from your trip to the land of jazz and hurricanes (both kinds).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Paul. I love that you noticed the alliteration. I actually thought of it, but only on one of the,. And yes, there are types of hurricanes, but I only saw one on this trip. Although, we had some horrific thunderstorms. I talked to one bar owner while he was getting ready to power wash the mats from behind his bar. He says it’s a daily ritual.

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  7. I have been there twice as well, but once so long ago I can’t remember much (I was young so I was “ahem” out and about on Bourbon St late at night) and once last spring. I had a field day! Isn’t it the worst when you go somewhere and you want so badly to get out and SEE things and you are stuck in your meeting/conference/hotel for 90% of the time? I love that your conference had a parade! And wonderful photos. I adore New Orleans architecture – it is so distinctly Nola and I can recognize a building from there 99% of the time (occasionally it’s from Savannah or Charleston). I did a bit of the French Quarter the last time, along with a couple hours in the Garden District and then two other random neighborhoods. And yes…I ended up in a VERY bad neighborhood and I stuck out like a sore thumb. It went from fine to bad in the span of a block, and I ended up sitting in a Subway while I waited for a cab to come and get me. Not the wisest move on my part. Also – in case you aren’t familiar, the pretty little house with the red doors is a double shotgun. Shotgun style is all over Nola and it’s my fave!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks for the clarification on the double shotgun Deb. I see that now. I’ve gotten pretty good at squeezing some walking time into meetings and conferences, but it does tend to put me on the street when there isn’t much of a crowd. I managed to be out early for photos and I managed to be out late one night. Pretty good for me.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a fun city, for sure. Late spring and summer require multiple showers and many clothing changes, unless you are used to off the chart humidity. Of course, that’s a northern boy talking so…

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      1. I can see that. I was born in Michigan and grew up in Ohio. However, the last two decades of my life have been spent in Texas, Georgia, NC, FL, Kuwait, Afghanistan… maybe I won’t need to change as much. Wait, I am girl. What girl turns down outfit changes?

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  8. I was there for a few days and I don’t remember much daylight at all, so I sure wasn’t lookin at doors, but these are all great. I love the hurricane shutters, the way the narrows open to wide, friendly spaces.
    Those gray-green doors surrounded by the reds, pinks, salmons — You’re right, it works on every level. That striking set is my favorite in this group!
    Great post! :)

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dan, your photos take me back to my one an only trip to Nawlins. The corner buildings look very familiar to me, although I can’t say I entered those establishments. I have a few vivid memories of the time I spent on or near Bourbon Street, like the kids who would perform on the street and then beg for money, or the homeless man with a plastic cup who would go from garbage can to garbage can, taking out the beer cans an pouring the leftover drippings into his cup. Sad, but true. Anyhow, I love all of your doors, especially of the shotgun type home with the red doors. Very cool and glad you didn’t find any trouble in the morning or at night. My girlfriend and I walked some very dark streets back in ’91, after which we proclaimed we were fortunate that no one saw us as potential victims.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Lots of see in New Orleans – was there(looong time ago) twice with friends, and we saw the more “artistic” parts of the city and even a concert of a brass band on the lawn – our kids were little, so we saw everything by day light. Wow, multiple doors! Sounds you had a great time exploring:)

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  11. Oh, I love the parade thing. Info-geek parade. That’s something you won’t see everyday ;-). The pictures are great. I start to wonder if I do have to put the US on my travel list. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for the tour, Dan. Great gallery. I’m a fan of NCIS, all versions, so I’ve seen some great doors on the show, too. As for geeks, my husband’s a IT, so I know a bit about them. :-) He’s a UNIX geek among other things.

    janet

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  13. I’ve been waiting for this post! I love that building with the curved balcony and wrought iron railing. I loved all the iron railings when I was there way back when.

    I don’t recall any digital signs like the one on your Corner Door image. I’d rather not see Bourbon St go this direction!

    How wonderful to see a parade while there! I was there during the World’s Fair and didn’t see a parade! I’m sure it lent itself to the party atmosphere New Orleans is famous for.

    I’m looking forward to more of your doors, history, and sights.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Deborah. Some of the locals were talking about Frenchman St (I think) as being the new Bourbon St. We still had a pretty good time. I have tons of pictures of the railings, I think they are so impressive.

      When the CEO told us about arranging to walk to the party venue behind a marching band, we thought he was kidding. When we exited the room, the band was waiting. The marched us out of the hotel, around the block to the party. It was pretty cool, especially for a bunch of geeks.

      I’m going to spread the photos out, lest someone think I’m shilling for NOLA Tourist Bureau :)

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I can’t say that New Orleans is a place I’ve ever been too keen on visiting (just a bit too debaucherous at times, if I may use the word), but I have always loved those iron work balconies and trim. Gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve only been for business meetings. I’m glad I can check it off the list, but I doubt I’ll visit on my own. I think those days are well behind me now. Still, the architecture is somewhat unique (I guess you can see it in other parts of the south) and very interesting.

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  15. You know my thoughts about Bourbon Street so I won’t repeat myself. I looked for a long time at those doors and I saw that most of them really look beat up and in need of some TLC. I can plainly see water damage on the bottom of a lot of doors and am surprised that most being made out of wood, did not need to be replaced due to swelling. Very cool post and am just so glad you took the pictures for me to look at. New Orleans is not somewhere I am going anywhere soon. Not on my bucket list either. Thanks, Dan!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think some wear the water damage as a badge of honor. Also, we had a horrific thunderstorm Wednesday afternoon and some street flooding was reported to hit 3′ Maybe it wasn’t all Katrina. I didn’t choose to go there, Amy, but “when in Rome” and all that. Plus, you know, doors :)

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  16. Siiiigh…. Soooo many memories. So much sadness. I’m having a beer, so well, it only nudges the sentimental me. (You don’t want to know why the streets are sticky.) I was able to tour NOLA on a 6th grade end of school field trip with all the wonder, bugged eyed amazement of a pre teen when it was in its heyday.it does my heart good to know people still love her, but things are sure not the same. Nice! You had a parade. But…were there beads or exposed body parts involved? Lol. I imagine not. Haha!

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  17. Great doors! Since I’m also a lover of doors, I should visit New Orleans. I’ve been thinking about going there for a long time but I never got the chance. With its love of voodoo and the paranormal, I should go there to at least research my books. I’ll let you know if I meet up with any witches or vampires.

    Liked by 1 person

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