Goodbye Sears

img_3791The word is out, our Sears store is among the 150 stores being closed as the department store financial institution holding company orphaned co-brand of K-mart Big-K, makes it easier for the corporate pallbearers to shovel it into the retail graveyard. Do I sound angry? I’m not, really. I’m disappointed, but Sears has been disappointing me for years, and our Sears store has been closing for years. Going there was a sad walk through a fading landscape, like the airport in Steven King’s “The Langoliers” – you kept thinking that somewhere, behind that wall, or down that aisle, was some activity, or maybe some new products, or maybe a sales person. But no. Hooks that were empty the last time you were there, would still be empty.

I think I first mentioned Sears in the very first post in my “If We Were Having a Beer” series. I was complaining that they didn’t have casual slacks in 38w 34l. They still don’t. Once, in frustration, I asked the clerk, who replied: “I can order them online and have them shipped to you for free.” I took her up on that offer, only to find that they didn’t have the size online either. I could get 36×34, a size I’m unlikely to ever see again, or 40×34, a size I’m sure I could achieve if I set my mind to it. It always bothered me that I could get 38×29, 38×30, 38×32, and 40×34 but not 38×34. Was I too tall or not heavy enough? I digress.

In addition to dying a slow death, Sears hasn’t been Sears for a very long time. In some cases, Sears was never Sears. Craftsman Tools were never made by Sears. Neither were Kenmore appliances, or Diehard batteries, but there was a time when that didn’t matter. I shopped at Sears because my father shopped at Sears. He shopped at Sears because the sales people knew what they were taking about, their products were good, their warranties were better and you could get Sears stuff anywhere.

I liked Sears because they often incorporated interesting features, like push-to-release ratchets and self-storing cords. I didn’t like Sears because they often made things a little different, so you had to go to Sears. I once owned a 7 ½” circular saw. It was almost identical to a 7 ¼” Skill Saw, but if you wanted that extra eight of an inch capacity – something you never needed – you had to go to Sears. Similarly, if you wanted a guide bushing for your Sears router, you had to go to Sears. But, they were the first manufacturer that I knew of that put a light in the router so you could see your cut, up close. Of course, if that bulb ever burned out…you get the picture.

We still have a Kenmore refrigerator; I think it was made by Whirlpool. We have a KitchenAid dishwasher, a Whirlpool dryer and I don’t know who made the washing machine, but we bought them all at Sears. We have a Sears garage door opener, which was made by Chamberlin, but I liked that I could go to the store and buy an extra bipper thingie to open it. Except, they stopped carrying that kind of stuff.

They stopped carrying blades for my Sears scroll saw. I didn’t buy that saw from Sears, I bought it from a neighbor whose husband died. I think I paid her $1 more than he paid Sears, but I stink at negotiating.

I knew the store was really dying when the sales staff stopped telling me that they could order the stuff online and told me to go home and order it online. Then, they might add: “I think you can get those from Amazon.” Of course I can get them from Amazon. I can get everything from Amazon because Amazon has brought the entire retail equation down to a single variable – price.

We still have a Sears we can go to, but it’s in the Holyoke Mall in Massachusetts. I won’t buy appliances there, because then I have to figure out the difference between MA sales tax and CT’s and remit the difference to CT with my state income tax. There’s a Sears in a nearby CT shopping mall, but I hate going to that mall because of the traffic.

The Sears Auto Center will remain open, but I don’t take my car there. At some point, it may be the only thing open at our local mall. Macy’s closed last year. Radio Sack, does anyone remember Radio Shack? Target remains open, but it’s not really in the mall, only barely attached to one side.

Yesterday, when I was getting some photos, I saw a parking lot full of cars in front of where Macy’s had been. I thought, maybe a new store was opening. Sadly, a car dealership opened inside the mall.

Maybe, once the last few stores close, they can film a Blues Brothers chase scene in Enfield. You have to look for the bright side.

If you want to see the possible future of this place:

About Dan Antion

Husband, father, woodworker, cyclist, photographer, geek - oh wait, I’m writing this like I only have 140 characters. I am all those things, and more, and all of these passions present me with opportunities to observe, and think about things that I can’t write about in other places. I have started this blog to catch the stuff that falls out, overflows and just plain doesn’t fit the other containers in my life.
This entry was posted in Nostalgia, Opinion, Shopping and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

85 Responses to Goodbye Sears

  1. Nice that you got one of my favourite films into the story – Go Blues Brothers. BTW, I want a pink tool box :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      You can have a pink tool box. Just don’t give it to Faith. I think there’s only one thing you can do with an abandoned mall. “You got us into this parking lot motorhead, you get us out.”

      Like

  2. Sears is part of our past because they let themselves get lapped by everyone else. I went there as a kid, an adult, and now my husband still buys tools there or takes something for replacement that was guaranteed for life. It’s sad, but I think we are going to be down to two stores – Amazon and Walmart. In NH, we have 4 Walmart stores within about 15 miles which seems more than sufficient to me. Here, there are 20 Walmarts within a 25 mile radius. I was looking on my phone for one ‘near me’ and couldn’t believe it. I should look for Sears, maybe there is 1. Have a good week, Dan, and good luck finding pants to fit. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Judy. 20 Walmarts within 25 miles? That’s scary. It’s sad to think that you’re probably right about Amazon and Walmart. I miss the days of competing department stores, but most younger people couldn’t care. Fortunately, I have a few really good tool stores within a 20 mile radius. I do my best to keep them open.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. GP Cox says:

    Funny you should mention the feeling of being in “The Langoliers”. The last time I went through my local Sears, I just couldn’t pin-point the feeling I had – and that was it!!! Sears was the standard for when our parents wanted a new washer or tools, etc. and now they’re going away. Times, they sure are a-changing!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ed F says:

    I understand the scotch tape store is flurishing.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Ha!!! The video is hysterical.
    As you say, Sears has been closing for years… It’s worrisome to say the least, to see so many retail stores closing. I say that even though I do nearly all my shopping online. Cultures change, and shopping habits with them. Retailers have to be flexible. But still… the idea of so many closing — knowing we will have to adapt to big change like that is very discomfiting. What did Churchill say? “I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught.”
    Huge hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks for the hugs, Teagan, it’s a great way to start the week. Maybe I’ll live long enough to see local retail stores make a comeback. I like the Churchill quote. That sums it up nicely,

      Like

  6. Ruth says:

    The UK equivalent of Radio Shack used to be called Tandy, but now all the Tandy stores are called Maplin – probably not quite the same thing, but they are still trading, at least! :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  7. quiall says:

    Our local Sears is going the same way. The prices on-line are higher than other stores and in-store help is hard to find. Fond memories though . . .

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dan Antion says:

      It’s true Pam. I remember my mom leaving me in the tool department at Sears. I would wander around while she shopped. It was like a baby sitter. I’d always buy something to add to my growing little tool box.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It was a special day when the Sears catalog came to the house – even special-er when it was the Christmas Wish Book! So, yeah, I have a soft spot for the place. As Pam mentioned, though, here too in Canada, it’s all downhill at this point.

      A friend here in town had a terrible time in December with customer service – they charged her four times for the same purchase – around $900 – it took the better part of a week before they corrected the error. Apparently, my friend was in the same boat as several other shoppers. Never again, says she.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I believe in a competitive business environment it important to reinvent and stay fresh. Many startups that were once promising in India have shut down their businesses in 2016 and many are closing now because they didn’t live up to the expectations of the customers and the hype that they generated early on.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      In many ways, the competition had an unfair advantage for years. They didn’t have to collect Sales Tax so, in CT, they could offer prices that were effectively 6-8% less without actually charging less. Now, they are large enough to control the market.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. loisajay says:

    I don’t know the status of our Sears. That and JC Penney were the only stores left standing when they scraped the one mall close to wear I work. It lay dormant for years, until they rebuilt as an ‘open air’ mall. Never went to the first mall; don’t ever go to this one. Not a mall kind of gal. Another icon bites the dust….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      The funny thing is, there are lots of mostly successful strip malls located all around this mall. This mall used to have a JC Penney. When that closed, Macy’s doubled-down and moved into the JCP space in addition to their existing space. They ended up with women’s stuff in one store and men’s stuff and appliances in another, When they closed, they left a huge hole. Sears just can’t seem to get anything right these days.

      Like

  10. marianallen says:

    We bought a television from them a million years ago, and they wouldn’t answer a service call on it when Mom called. So I, then a pissy teenager, called and said, in my pissiest voice, “I’m calling for Genarose Turner. We’ve called three times to request repair on this television — ” The woman at the call center said, “Oh! Oh, I’m so very sorry! I’ll put the request in right now and flag it as urgent! Tell the General someone will be right out!” I said, “…Thank you,” and hung up very quietly. A repairman was there within the hour.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Ha! That’s a funny story. They have generally been very good for appliances, but I wonder where that business is heading now. They recently sold the Craftsman brand to Stanley Tools. I think that officially leaves them with nothing Sears-like in their inventory except maybe for Kennmore appliances. But they sell every other brand and so does everyone else.

      Like

  11. bikerchick57 says:

    I stopped shopping for clothes or anything at Sears years ago. Their apparel stopped being attractive to me because it seemed old and out of style. This is truly sad. I remember being excited, when I was young, to get the latest Sears catalog so that I could go through it and check out toys and then later, as a teenager, the clothes that I thought were pretty cool at the time. We have a Sears at our mall, but this mall is a large enough place with plenty of stores and traffic. I believe it’s the way they stay in business.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I never liked Sears for “fashion” but being a guy, all I needed were Dockers and jeans, so it didn’t matter. Back when they carried my size, they sold them for $15 less per pair than Macy’s. I always like their hand tools, but they started to lose their appear as they started reducing the warranty and selling gimicky things and other brands. I used to love the catalog.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. msgt3227 says:

    I suppose it is sad, but it is really just Darwinian survival afterall… Maggie Wilson mentioned the Sears catalog… Think how radical THAT was when it first arrived, especially for those out on the frontier where your little community might support a small General Store. That catalog offered HUNDREDS of options your GS couldn’t afford to. Then came Department Stores, and BigBox stores. Catalogs still try to do that today, but the Internet is eclipsing them as well as the BigBox & Department stores. So it goes…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I suppose you’re right. I know that they have been under pressure for years from big box stores and the Internet, but it still seemed that there are some things people want to see before buying. I doubt very much that this mall will survive with Target as the only anchor store, especially since it’s easier to get in and out of Target without going into the mall.

      Like

  13. John Holton says:

    Nothing sadder than a dying shopping mall. I grew up in Chicago, where Sears was an institution and the tallest building (at one time in the world) was the Sears Tower. I think it’s the death of retail with the advent of the Internet and Amazon.com. Sad, but more of an evolution than a death. The name still means something to some of us.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I think what’s really sad, John is that the name seems to mean more to people like you and me than it does to Sears. There are still two viable stores within driving distance, I just don’t know if I want to drive to them. They sold Craftsman to Stanley Tools (a move I applaud) and that’s about 75% of what Sears meant to me.

      Like

      • John Holton says:

        I have a friend from Farm Country, Indiana, and he always thought “Satisfaction Guaranteed Or Your Money Back” was the best slogan ever. Their Big Book was the best; you literally could get anything from them except food. Sears and Montgomery Ward’s were the two biggest names in catalog sales at one time; now Ward’s is gone and Sears has one foot in the grave.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Almost Iowa says:

    During its heyday, Sears sold cars. Yup, you read that right. You could order a car out of a Sears catalog. It came in a box and you had to put it together yourself. They sold houses too. I don’t think they came in a box.

    The Sears Motor Buggy, http://searsmotorbuggy.com/Sears_history.php

    Liked by 1 person

  15. We had a Sears store close as well. With Zellers completely gone and Sears dying, I’m literally lost and can’t get the products I could before. I’ve had to rebuild a household, and it just hasn’t been the same.

    We also have a situation where neighbourhood malls are dying in an otherwise bustling and growing city. Everything is being centralized into one or two mega shopping areas. This is inconvenient in terms of distance, traffic, and layout. The whole point with neighbourhood malls was their closeness, convenience, and not too big a size. I’m not going to pack a lunch and a hiking backpack to make a day out of shopping (ugh), much of which involves a significant geographical commute from Store A to Store B through a sea of traffic and crowds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      This Sears only opened in the late 80s or early 90s. They moved into a space vacated by a regional department store when Macy’s was buying everything and killing off the little guys. I guess, as many have said, it’s evolution, but it’s still sad. The malls that still have a Sears are the ones with 130 stores across levels and wings and parking lots that are nightmares. And, that’s after a 35-40 minute drive to get to them. As they strip away more and more things that made them Sears, there’s less of a reason to make that drive.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. The Sears nearest me closed in the Fall last year. I don’t think the auto repair section is open anymore either. My experience with Sears that last decade has been few b/c the staff wasn’t knowledgeable about the products, and they didn’t have what I wanted.

    I needed a new vacuum cleaner in Dec. and have always used a Kenmore so drove all the way across town (16 miles )to the last Sears in town hoping to find one to replace the one that died. I found one I like but they didn’t have it in stock so, they ordered it online and shipped to my house with free shipping. If this one lasts as long as my old one it may well be the last vacuum cleaner I ever buy. Lord knows what brand or where I’d buy a replacement in the future if not!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      We bought appliances from this store because the people seemed knowledgeable. The people in the big box stores seem to just be moving a product. They might have one person in the department that actually understands the products, and he/she is never available. Everything else is outsourced. At least when we bought an appliance from Sears, a Sears truck delivered it. I bought an appliance several years ago for the office, from Lowes. The delivery was all messed up, and they told me to deal with the logistics company. I told them that “I bought this from Lowes. Either make this right or come get it and give me my money back.” Good luck with the vacuum!

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Relax... says:

    Montgomery Wards was first to go around here (we called it “Monkey Wards”). Then Sears filed for Chapter 11 and began their years’-long closings in my two areas, but until then, I liked them only for their boys’ tall and slim pants sizings, and their guinea pigs. (The Wishbook remained the wishbook, but it provided hours of entertainment and a few hints for Santa.) Sears’ appliances were excellent. One store relocated to a mega-mall and remains open, but maybe not forever….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I remember Monkey Wards :) They’ve been gone a long time. Sears saved this particular mall when they moved in, but they made it conditional on the mall expanding (which they did). I guess they had a good run, but I don’t know of the mall has any hope of filling the holes from three out of four anchor stores departing. There just aren’t many stores out there that can fill that much space.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Joanne Sisco says:

    Are any of the ‘value’ department store chains from the pre-1980s managing to survive? I’m thinking of the Canadian market and I don’t think so unless I want to count the Hudson’s Bay Company. Since the 80s we’ve seen an influx of WalMarts and Winners. In the last 10 years, I would add the Dollar Stores.
    Sadly, it is just one more version of watching our youth disappear.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. truthspew says:

    Part of the problem with Sears is that their upper management thought it was a good idea to have stores compete against each other. That sent morale into the shitter.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. An all-American institution fading away. Years of bad management. Good post Dan

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Outside of a couple real Sears Stores in the entire Phoenix metropolitan area, everything Sears here is appliance stores. Ironically enough, we just bought all new appliances at one (doesn’t it always seem to be that when one appliance bites the dust, the rest of them in the house follow suit….or is it just us??)…anyway to your point they are all made by someone else……we could have been shopping at any number of appliance stores….even sadder is the death of major malls…retail is changing…as you said: evolution!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      It’s not just you, Kirt. I don’t know how this mall will survive. Macy’s had two of the anchor slots and Sears and Target the other two. Now it’s just Target. I guess the next time the appliances kick, I’ll have to go to the big box.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. joey says:

    When we bought our house, it came with the same harvest gold Kenmore washer and dryer I grew up with. They still work, you know. Or rather, they did when we moved them out for our own. I like a lot of the brands carried by Sears, and I grew up dreaming in Sears’ Wish Book :) The Mister ran Sears Auto Centers for several years, and as long as his favorite mechanic works there, that’s where his van will go. I wonder if ours is closing. I shall Google.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Mark says:

    I don’t feel bad that Sears is going away. The last time I went there, I was fooled into believing the item that I had called them about, which was on sale, was in stock. I was told that they had a good supply. When I arrived there 30 minutes later, I was told that they didn’t have that item, but they had the next better item in stock, which was not on sale. They did that once before to me with tires. When I called their customer service to inform them, they tried to get me to take a $100 gift certificate. I refused it and told them That my call was for their information only. In the next 3 weeks, I received 14 calls from them wanting to know my story, each one offered me the $100. Finally on the 15th call, I said ok to the $100. That was the last call I got from them and I never did receive the $100. Bye Bye Sears!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Tammy Craig says:

    About 10 years ago, we remodeled our kitchen and we purchased Kenmore Elite appliances. When the fridge arrived, it did not work. We had spent about $4,000 on these appliances. I called and the quickest a repairman could come was two weeks. That was unacceptable. On the day he was to repair the brand new fridge, he got in a car wreck. So, they called to tell me it would have to be another 2 weeks as I had to be put back on the list. I called every supervisor all the way to the corporate office. I basically received no assistance and all they gave me was a $50 Sears gift card. I told the vice president in Chicago that I would never step foot back into a Sears, and I never have. Also, the stove, microwave, and dishwasher are all broken. Kenmore Elite wasn’t very elite.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I got a job at Sears 30 years ago and my dad was jealous. We always went to Sears when we went to town.
    I met my wife there, 20 years old working in lingerie. You can find it all in Sears my grandpa used to say. He’d smile and wink at my wife.
    Sad to see them go but at least Sears will be out of pain. I guess it’s for the best.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I somehow started with the video which was good, because I was laughing before you made me sad again. I used to go out of my way for Sears but since it went into the other store I avoid it.
    We still have a Radio Shack -2 in fact – but I hate how many strip malls are empty and attract unsavory characters. The pink cases would make me happy, but I understand your daughter cringing.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Glynis Jolly says:

    It’s sad the store so many of us grew up with is fading away little by little. Did we expect it to go on forever? In some ways, I think we did.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Peter Nena says:

    I have heard of Sears & Roebuck. I don’t know if it’s the same one. But two things really caught my eyes:
    1. The Langoliers. That is a fine story. I read it when I was at the peak of my Stepheng-King-devouring days. Time rips and all. Later on I watched it.
    2. That you stink at negotiating. I think I’m worse. I really, really bad at negotiating. Usually I’d rather just pay the guy so he can leave me alone. Then later on I feel the rage and curse him for overcharging me. I prefer supermarkets because the price is fixed and I don’t have to ask anyone where anything is and how much it costs. Some days, if go to an ordinary shop, I pretend to be a hardcore know-it-all man-about-town, but once the seller starts haggling, I lose.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Yes, Sears & Roebuck became Sears. I once prodded them, in a blog post, to come clean and tell us what they did with Roebuck. I’m not sure what kind of personality traits are required for negotiating, but I don’t have them. I’d be terrible in a market where you’re expected to haggle. I’m don’t like a lot of Stephen King, but I liked The Langoliers.

      Like

  29. dweezer19 says:

    I totally get it. Hubby always wanted Sears for tools. Now it is a shell of what it was. Most department stores are. Sears had the very first health food retAil products I ever bought. They didn’t all have this section but ours did. And Macy’s has always been my go to for quality sale shopping. Of. Ourse tgats where the checkout girl informed me they were all waiting for my generation to die off so they could go completely paperless. 😕Sorry Dan. I don’t mind growing older. Its the surrounding decay that bugs my soul.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I’m with you, Cheryl. I don’t mind getting older but sometimes, I wonder if people realize how much we lose as we pursue lower costs and greater convenience. I’d hate for my only interaction with other humans to be when I go to work :(

      Like

  30. Lisa says:

    As a 35 year associate of Sears I’ve seen my share of change. Our store is closing in March. Heartbreaking, but we’ve been dying for years. Poor upper management for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Wendy Brydge says:

    This one I can related to, Dan. There was never a Sears retail store this far north, but we did have a small Sears appliance store as well as a secondary Sears catalogue outlet for a long time. The catalogue outlet store closed up three years ago, and then the appliance store closed the following year. Another catalogue pick-up opened in the next town over, and then it got moved to the next town over from THAT. But it’s just as well at this point. I used to shop the catalogue a LOT (Sears used to have the best selections/prices/sizes on clothes), but once the shipping charge started climbing, and then the prices went crazy? I pretty much gave up on Sears completely.

    It is really sad to see so many of these staple stores closing. Seems like online shopping is going to take over completely. Which is a real shame, because while I DO like the convenience and often lower pricing that comes from Amazon and ebay and some others, there are just some things you NEED to do in-store. I’ve been trying to find a pair of nude heels for a friend’s upcoming wedding, and shoes are just not the kind of thing you can buy online. Sure, you can FIND what you want! But you have to be able to try on a pair of shoes before you buy them. You just do! Sizes fluctuate so badly when it comes to any type of clothing. Size-X is not universal. Brands, manufacturers, etc. can be so different. There’s only one store in my town now that sells shoes (well, AFFORDABLE ones — I’ll never pay $100 for a pair of shoes I’ll only wear once or twice), and needless to say, there’s nothing of any use to me.

    So RIP, Sears. We will all miss you in some way, shape or form. :(

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks for the comment, Wendy. Although guys usually have the advantage of being able to say: “38×34 is my size,” it’s not the same for shoes and tools. I do have to try on shoes. I also like to “try on” tools. Do I like how it feels in my hand? Do I like the way it operates? Are the controls convenient? So many things to consider. Fortunately, I have places around where I can go, and, now that Stanley bought the Craftsman brand, I should be able to find it in more places. Everything can’t be done over the Internet. I’m sure I will be proven wrong, but that’s my story for now, and I’m sticking to it.

      Liked by 1 person

  32. A closing store makes me sad. These empty aisles and greedy customers looking for the bargain…
    Remember the slow fall of the Radio Shacks which were such a big thing for tech guys in the 1990s. Sears was often the only big store in rural and mountain areas. We bought our first fridge there in Cal. I’m not too surprised, though, to see them close. Most people shop online, something I don’t like to do. But I’m an exception.
    I won’t comment on the pants but will just say that it is harder now to find more than one or two pairs in the size we need. For men and women alike. You’ll see tons of the smallest and biggest sizes and pretty much nothing in between. Maybe one of the reasons people start to order more online than ever.
    Still sad to see all these stores of the past vanish. Must be even harder for people who grew up with them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      It is sad. I remember Radio Shack from when I has very young and buying project parts and kits. Sears has been a retail staple in my life. I don’t remember a time without a Sears nearby and I’d have to really think to count up the number of tools, tires and batteries we’ve bought there. In addition to being sad, I’m disappointed, because I think they had a chance to successfully battle the online world, but they couldn’t seem to get out of their own way.

      Liked by 1 person

  33. I’m sad to see any department store close. It’s like a piece of history vanishing for good. I had to say goodbye to Sterns and A&S. I’m afraid one day Macys will close. That would really hurt. I grew up in Macys.

    Liked by 1 person

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