Thursday Doors – Farms and Barns

You can’t go wrong with white.

A few weeks ago, I shared some pictures with a One-Liner Wednesday post that were taken while my brother and I were rapidly making our way from Ames, Iowa to the Minneapolis Airport (MSP). I mentioned that I had some photos of doors-at-a-distance, but that I would save them for a later date.

Today is that date, and that’s really good news for you. For the third time this week, I will do very little writing (beware, Saturday is coming). I could share the story about why we were heading to MSP, but you can read that for yourself. I’m just going to load a bunch of photos into the gallery, do my best to explain them in the captions and hope that you enjoy this post.

Thursday Doors, for the uninitiated, is a weekly blogfest for door freaks aficionados, orchestrated by none other than Norm Frampton. Norm opens the festivities early each Thursday morning and keeps the doors (get it?) open until noon, Saturday. Enter through Norm’s door, look around, maybe add a comment, and look for the blue frog. Click that little guy to enter a gallery of doors from around the world, literally. If you have a door to share, you will find everything you need to make that task dirt-simple

76 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Farms and Barns

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  1. Looks just like the ones I (tried) to shoot on our drive from KC to Lincoln. I love seeing the old barns and farmhouses though. I always wanted a wood frame two atory house with a big wrap around porch. Then I saw one too many horror films. That grain bin house looks intriguing….see you Saturday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. These are hard to capture at highway speed. I have a large number of blurred photos. Some of these look like nice places to live, but it also looks like there’s a lot of work to be done. I don’t thing most people appreciate farmers as much as they should.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. A nice collection of different styles and sizes of barns and silos. I really like that grain bin that’s now a house. There’s just something about round buildings and architectural features that is so appealing! Wouldn’t you love to see the interior and how they’ve divided it into various living spaces?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have a few white barns around here, Jean. I drive by one every day on my way home, and I would love to get some photos of it. Unfortunately, the only place to par is in the guy’s driveway, so I’d have to approach him and give him the door-story and hope for the best.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. When I worked at the museum back in St George, we looked into purchasing an old barn to use as a gallery/meeting/theatre space – it’s a niche market I guess – but there seems to be a trend whereby old buildings are removed and rebuilt to suit on your site. The thought was appealing, but the price tag? Not so much.

    So, what’s wrong with the last picture? No doors!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve read about some barns and mills being taken apart, marked and rebuilt somewhere else, but you’re right, Maggie, the price tags seem outrageous. I think the metal bin in that last photo either fell or had something crash into it.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Nice gallery, Dan. I love the look of barns, both old and new, no matter the color. The casino cracked me up. Pretty unique…I’d like to see the inside (but not gamble). As with many door photos from Norm’s weekly series, the inside of the grain bin house intrigues me. Wouldn’t you love to knock on the door and ask to see the inside? I bet it’s pretty cool.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Great photos, especially for zooming, but not too fast. ;) I love the “um, something collapsed” and am a fan of the photo captioned with “Quite the collection…”
    Somewhere, my MIL knows, we have a big round barn literally called The Big Round Barn.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thansk! I’m all for naming things as they appear. My favorite word is ‘fireplace’ – simple and nothing more needs to be said. I can imaging directions, “turn left after the big round barn.” Works for me :)

      I do like the “quite the collection” and others that depict what I think of as a traditional farm scene.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. We have a couple of white barns around us in CT, but in general, I think they are rare. I really like the brown/natural barns, but I guess they are all in various states of decay. They still do capture you eye and imagination.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. It makes me happy to see thriving farms. I grew up in Omaha, Nebraska, but my grandparents lived on a farm about an hour and half away. Between that and traveling in or through the Midwest, I’ve seen a lot of farms. I like the shot of the airport, too.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed this, Janet. I always enjoy looking at the farms as we drive by when I visit my family in Iowa. Driving north to MSP seemed to have more bans on display than driving east/west to and from Omaha. Maybe it’s just that I was in the mood to be distracted that day.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Great way to capture these images. Y’know we all drive by shots like that and perhaps never think to do what you did. (Or in my case, know I won’t get it in focus, so don’t try) Your post is a good reminder to us all that we should think outside the box more.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I love old barns! Reminds me of my childhood days when my brothers and I would play in them and build tunnels using haystacks. We also loved exploring old mills. The road we lived on in Newark, Deleware was called Old Mill Road. There were two of them and both were dilapidated and had keep-out signs posted. But being three curious, risk-taking kids, we went in them anyway. They were creepy and creaky but a lot of fun.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You were a child after my own heart, Sandi. I played in old barns and building and I ignored those signs as often as possible. Those places were such fuel for the imagination.

      Like

  9. Nice bunch of pictures. I LOVE sliding barn doors! Yay! And those are the fanciest silos EVER. The grain bin house looks hard to temp-control, but I expect they’ve figured something out for that. The weathered barns are the best.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I was wondering about insulating a round tin can for living space, but it’s in northern Iowa so you’re right, I guess they figured that part out. Sliding barn doors are the best!

      Like

  10. Wow, nice collection of barns! When living in the city for most of my live, I never understood when people went gaga over barns, but now I live in the middle of nowhere, I’m beginning to understand that there are not many buildings to look at, and there are so many types of barns that they have become landmarks. My favorite is the round blue one between the trees:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks! I love barns, of all shapes and sizes. We don’t have a lot of general “farm style” barns around us. Lots of tobacco barks, but not many for hay and animals. Still, there are enough to make the ride interesting.

      Like

          1. Guess this is still new to me, because all this time I’ve been living in California. (Traveling to family in Holland as well as visiting states in North and East, was a little too much on our budget). Good there are blogs:)

            Liked by 1 person

  11. I loved the grain bin house. I enjoyed the first white barn photograph best! The barns in your collection all look focused, which says a lot for your aim, point and shoot abilities while rushing in your brother’s car! :D
    I accidentally didn’t get a door in my post, but love visiting doors folks like you! Have a wonderful weekend, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Don’t they tend to get some serious snow in Iowa? A white barn during a white might be hard to see? I love their silo shapes out there, and the old barn with the finial is neat.

    The Grain bin house is interesting. I’m going to search that and see if there are interior images online. I’d love to see one decorated, and furnished. I would think circular walls everywhere would be hard to furnish, but I could be wrong. :)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They do get a lot of snow in this area. I never thought of what a white barn might look like in a snow storm. Wasn’t there an old joke about that? I was able to find some interior images of the Bin Houses. Thanks for your comments on the photos :)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I don’t know any jokes about it, but I have heard about farmers having to tie a rope from the house to the barn and use it as a guide during a snow storm/blizzard. Having a white barn would make it tough to see and easy to get lost I’m thinking so, that rope to the barn thing must be true.

        I’m planning to look for grain bin houses today online. I’ll have some time to search while under the dryer at the Salon. :)

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I guess I was thinking of the white sheet of paper being a polar bear in a snowstorm. I hope He Man is aware that I am not responsible for you’re wanting to buy a grain bin by the shore and turn it into a weekend getaway.

          Liked by 1 person

  13. The white barns do stand out in this post to me, also. You had a white weathered barn in photo #5. I liked the roof line in its slope and design. Usually I like the red barns and notice them first, but I find myself looking at the details more when it is a white barn.

    Liked by 1 person

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