Thursday Doors – St. Augustine Lighthouse

Welcome to St. Augustine Lighthouse!

As I mentioned yesterday, a brief meeting in St. Augustine, bracketed by flights in and out of Daytona Beach, FL left me with little time for sightseeing. I did manage to collect a bunch of photos that I will share at some point, but the highlight of my travel was touring the lighthouse in St. Augustine. I love lighthouses and this one is beautiful, well preserved and maintained, and includes a Light Keeper’s House and museum. It just doesn’t get any better.

Since I have way too many photos to share in any one blog post, I culled out the photos with doors in them to share in Thursday Doors.

 

Thursday Doors is a weekly gathering of the fleet of door aficionados from all over the world. Light Keeper, Norm Frampton lights the lamp Thursday morning and keeps it burning until noon Saturday. If you have a door to share, or just want to see some amazing doors, set sail for the official Thursday Doors lighthouse in Montreal. Once that’s in sight, look at Norm’s doors, then look for the blue frog. Click that tadpole to be guided safely into the harbor.

I’m going to quote some of the information from the Lighthouse history page. They’ve done a better job researching and writing than I could. I urge you to visit the page, as their history is more complete and I would absolutely urge you to visit the lighthouse if you’re ever in the area. St. Augustine is the oldest city in the United States. It offers a rich collection of historic buildings, and a remarkable fort – you might need more than one day. According to the website:

“A Spanish watchtower, built in the late 1500’s was the predecessor of the present St. Augustine Lighthouse. St. Augustine is the site of the oldest, permanent aid to navigation in North America.”

The lighthouse is built with Alabama brick and, as you might have seen yesterday, iron stairs, railings and landings that were made in Philadelphia. The light is topped with a hand-blown, nine-foot-tall, Fresnel lens, that was constructed in Paris, France, and remains one of only a few such operating lenses in the United States.

“The St. Augustine Lighthouse rises 165 feet above sea level and contains 219 steps that are climbed by visitors. At the top, the original, first order Fresnel lens still serves the beacon, but today is lit by a 1000 watt bulb, and maintained by the museum and volunteers. The St. Augustine lens consists of 370 hand-cut glass prisms arranged in a beehive shape towering twelve feet tall and six feet in diameter… The Lighthouse is St. Augustine’s oldest surviving brick structure, and today the site is restored to colors and materials used in the year 1888.”

“In 1876, a brick light keeper’s house was added to the property, a triplex that held two families and a young, single, 2nd assistant keeper. Light keepers’ and their assistants lived and worked at the Light Station until the tower was automated in 1955.”

Standing guard over a coastline that is regularly subjected to high winds and punishing rain, the lighthouse had to be strong. That required strong doors and windows. As I stopped to catch my breath let others pass on my way up, I enjoyed a stiff cool breeze entering those windows. It occurred to me that, it wasn’t all that windy a day. But, the higher I climbed, the more the wind made its presence known.

The light keepers home was a wonderful tour in and of itself. I will put together a post about that later, but I’m including the door photos here. I’ll stop yammering now, and offer the gallery of photos. Click on any one to begin a slide show. I have added captions to further explain some of the cool things that I saw on the tour.

About Dan Antion

Husband, father, woodworker, cyclist, photographer, geek - oh wait, I’m writing this like I only have 140 characters. I am all those things, and more, and all of these passions present me with opportunities to observe, and think about things that I can’t write about in other places. I have started this blog to catch the stuff that falls out, overflows and just plain doesn’t fit the other containers in my life.
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81 Responses to Thursday Doors – St. Augustine Lighthouse

  1. The oldest city! That’s cool!
    Now, since you spotted the exterior “Z” on the cabinet, perhaps you can explain the hole in the top of the door?
    Happy Thursday, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Oh, I do love a lighthouse, and this one is the ‘King.’ I probably won’t get to visit, so I really appreciate the tour. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. dweezer19 says:

    Thanks for the tour Dan. You really need to cacth the Ponce De Leon lighthouse next time you’re in Daytona. It is beautiful as well and has a hiking trail next to the museum grounds. I love these photos. Can’t believe I have yet to get the tour of this one but you have caused me to vow to get inside now. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  4. GP Cox says:

    Great job for the oldest city’s lighthouse, Dan! The city should hire you to put together their next advertising campaign!!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Liu Min says:

    Please keep these pictures coming! They are lovely! I have never heard of lighthouse until I read your post here.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Thanks for the tour! I love lighthouses. In the past, we spent a day touring St. Augustine and made it to the the fort, but not the lighthouse. Florida history is the focus of 4th grade and we still lived there for 2 of our 3 children to have their end of the year field trip be to St. Augustine as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. msgt3227 says:

    Great pictures Dan! I regret I never took the tour of the lighthouse, so thanks for “taking me along” on yours!! A reason to go back to St. Augustine I guess! :)

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Joanne Sisco says:

    This is why I love blogging – I learn something new (St Augustine is the oldest city in the US … I would NEVER have guessed that one!!), and I get to experience someplace new through someone else’s camera lens.
    Lighthouses have a romantic mystique about them – and they’re round. I do love rounded architecture! … and that gorgeous rounded cabinet. All I would need is a lighthouse to keep it in ;)

    Liked by 2 people

  9. loisajay says:

    Ahem…..St Augustine and Pensacola, where I live, have an ongoing feud as to which is the oldest city. St Augustine is beautiful, though. My daughter went to Flagler College for a short while–I loved going there to visit her. The lighthouse is wonderful! Great post, Dan.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I love lighthouses, Dan. This one is a beauty, great photos. Well done on not having to stop to ‘catch your breath’ ;)

    Liked by 1 person

  11. ianbcross says:

    Superb Dan. Reminds me of “My Father was a Lighthouse Keeper” by Incredible String Band:
    Lying on the beach with desire
    Rocking to the music of the waves
    I was in despair
    My heart needed repair
    My lover had lied to me
    And I was bored by what I saw there…

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Great tour, Dan. I have always loved to visit St Augustine and you gave me a memory jog. :-D

    Liked by 1 person

  13. LucciaGray says:

    Lovely doors and stunning views:)

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Love it! I haven’t been to St. Augustine since I was a child, so I don’t really remember it. Now I could go up the stairs of a lighthouse and even out onto the walkway, although I’d probably be close to the building. But in those days, I couldn’t have done the stairs, at least if they were the metal, open kind. What a gorgeous light house! The only thing that threw me was the sign with the name. It’s in the plural (Keepers’) where I would have expect the singular (Keeper’s). Interesting.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Thanks Janet. That sign threw me too, and I got it wrong in the post, but, ironically, I did give the answer. There were multiple light keepers living in that house up until 1955.

      The stairs were open, but the balcony was surrounded by a nice sturdy high wall. It was a very nice lighthouse to tour.

      Like

  15. Excellent “Doors” post, Dan. When I was a child I always wanted to go to St. Augustine — it caught my imagination. I never got around to going though when I lived in the deep south.
    My first thought was “What a small door.” Immediately followed by, “With a lighthouse, it would need to be small!” Looking forward to the other photos. Have a thriving Thursday.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. jesh stg says:

    What a boldly painted light house tower!That chess table is so cute, as well as the doors to that tiny library! and see you have done your exercise that day – I’m already huffing and puffin by a 100 steps! Wonder why it was named after Augustine… great post, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      Apparently, sailing from Spain, they first sighted land on the day of the Feast of St. Augustine. I love the little library, and I always enjoy seeing the historic woodworking pieces. Thanks for the comment.

      Like

      • jesh stg says:

        That makes sense -Augustine is one of my favorite people from history:) When I saw that library it reminded me of how spoiled we are today with an over-abundance of books we can buy (and I do!).

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Great doors and lovely lighthouse! I wonder if they will ever replace that 1000 watt bulb with an LED? :)

    Liked by 1 person

  18. bikerchick57 says:

    That’s a very lovely and well-maintained lighthouse and you captured some wonderful photos, Dan. Plus, you had a nice day. I wonder what that place is like in a storm, but then again, who wants to know? ;-)

    Liked by 1 person

  19. JT Twissel says:

    I’ve always wanted to see St Augustine-sounds like a lovely town and a great lighthouse. Thx

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Kathy says:

    I also love lighthouses and enjoyed your tour of this one, as I’ll probably never get to see it in person.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Great arm-chair tour! I love that black line spiraling up the outside of the light’s tower. We don’t have any like that that I know of here. It looks great with the reddish roof.

    What a fabulous chest/armoir that black and white curved piece is!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. joey says:

    It is a pretty one. I like how they keep it up. The colors really make it. I’m particularly fond of the studded white metal door that goes out to the balcony. Nicely done, Dan :)

    Like

  23. Val says:

    Wow, this is amazing! My fave apart from some of the door-like windows in the lighthouse is that curved piece of furniture. How did they make the curved parts? Were they carved out of a solid piece, do you think, or turned or what?
    If you like lighthouses, look out for a British artist (now passed) called David Smith. I knew him for years and he did a series of paintings of Lighthouses. There are a few here https://artuk.org/discover/artists/smith-david-19201999 but much more colourful ones on other sites.

    Like

    • Dan Antion says:

      I’m glad you like that Val. The curved sections of the panel doors would have been cut out of think stock, and likely they would have cut the top and bottom rail out of the same piece. The join (the groove and the detail that looks like molding) would have been cut with a special hand plane. I’ve seen these tools, I have a couple; they work well, but I can only imagine trying to keep it in the correct place on a curve. The curved panel was probably just bent, either with the help of steam or hot water. Thanks for the link.

      Like

  24. marianallen says:

    Great shots! The lighthouse keeper’s house looks so simple from the front and like an apartment building from the back! Why so many doors, I wonder, other than the fact that doors are nifty? Did they maybe have multiple keepers at the same time? That would kinda make sense. And you’re right: that curved cabinet is a wonderful piece!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. reocochran says:

    This was an amazing collection with more than enough doors for two months! Packed into one Thursday’s Doors post.
    I liked the striped lighthouse, I liked the door to it, the keeper’s house is beautiful. I enjoyed the cream and blue curved cabinet’s doors, the pretty desk doors and the china cabinet glass doors (could be a library cabinet). I am not sure where the lighthouse we took the kids to but we did go close to St. Augustine with our children when we spent time in Daytona Beach. :)
    Lake Erie has lighthouses and I’ve been to eight of them. The best lighthouse museum display was the ancient wrecks on the UP in Michigan. (Great Lakes Shipwreck Museum on Whitefish Point. There are pieces of the Edmund Fitzgerald. . .)
    I sure did like the Gordon Lightfoot song, with same name. I checked it was written in 1976. Maybe I can screen shot some of those digital camera photos. . .

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      That’s a lot of light houses. Cheryl says there is a nice lighthouse in Daytona Beach, maybe that’s the one you visited.I do love that curved cabinet. I’ll trust anybody’s color choice over mine. I’ve always liked that song. There was a documentary on that ship on PBS last year, well, I saw it last year.

      Liked by 1 person

      • reocochran says:

        I will have to look this up in my photo albums which although seems like “just yesterday,” it may be as many as sixteen to twenty years ago!
        I watched the Edmund Fitzgerald docunebtary on PBS, probably a year ago, Dan. My memory may not be quite timely but I did find it well done. :)
        Speaking of PBS, I read an article about a reality show on that broadcast where people are placed in slum settings like during Charles Dickens era. I would not enjoy this but “Mercy Street” may still be the one new show I liked.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Dan Antion says:

          I think you’re right about the timing of that PBS special and the new show.

          Liked by 1 person

          • reocochran says:

            Thanks and seems our society goes in cycles. Timing of those shows and films come back again. :)
            We liked a rather dark cowboy type of police movie, “Come Hell or High Water,” (Jeff Bridges) watched with Randy and my Mom. We talked about Maverick, Rawhide, Bonanza and Guns of Will Sonnet, John Wayne, Gary Cooper, plus more.
            Then we thought of how some time periods are ones “worth coming back to.” I’m sure there are a couple of Western shows everyone remembers with fondness.

            Liked by 1 person

  26. reocochran says:

    Oops, my eyes thought it was navy and white cabinet, but I trust Deborah and will retract blue and make it “black and white,” Dan. . .

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Lighthouses are great to see and each are unique as well as the coastal areas they protect. I visited the Pigeon Point Lighthouse along our CA coast and learned a bit about their Fresnel Lens (mainly how to pronunce it) and how they took it down and have it on public display (they use a LED lens now). The staff also told me that the timing of each lighthouse’s beacon is unique and identifies which lighthouse the ships are looking at. I enjoyed you post and might go archiving to see some my old lighthouse photos someday. No doubt, you found some great doors here!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dan Antion says:

      I didn’t know about the timing. That’s pretty cool. I guess it would be helpful to know what lighthouse you are looking at. I find stuff like that amazing. We are so impressed with modern technology, but there’s an example of a simple yet clever way to solve a big problem. Thanks for adding that!

      Like

  28. Norm 2.0 says:

    Excellent post Dan. Who doesn’t love a well-maintained lighthouse?
    It’s nice to see how well it is kept; lot’s of history in that place. if I ever make it out that way, this is exactly the kind of place I’d want to explore.
    Thanks for the tour :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  29. The city of Saint Augustine is interesting to visit and the historic buildings are gorgeous. I have not visited the lighthouse when I was there last time. But your photos make me want to. Beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Wonderful! I love lighthouses.

    Liked by 1 person

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