Thursday Doors – Town-ish Doors

Windsor Locks Town Hall

Summer activity is in full swing around here, which is putting a crimp on doorscurrsions and, to a lesser degree, time for writing. I had a plan for this week’s Monday post and Thursday Doors. When Monday’s post went off the rails, it took Thursday with it. I think they call that collateral damage.

In searching through my draft doors, backup doors and emergency doors, I found photos of our Town Hall. The problem is there isn’t much history and there aren’t many doors. That’s why that post has never been written. On the other hand, I also have a few doors from the Windsor Locks Canal. Since the town and the canal are totally intertwined, it seemed like a good idea to merge these two fragments.

Windsor Locks Town Hall is located in the former Union School building. Once inside, it looks and feels like a school. I would imagine that our First Selectman’s office once was the Principal’s office. It’s in that location in the building and it has that feel (this from someone who is well-acquainted with principals’ offices…you can trust me). The doors are also what you would expect in this part of the country. They have a colonial look and, of course, they are plastered with signs. There’s an addition to the building that was built with careful attention to blending the new with the old.

Town Hall sits at the north end of a large parcel of town land. To the west is the town’s single middle school building and to the east is the relatively new (90s) public library, In between the three buildings are sports fields. Town Hall is on Church St, and it’s bookended by two churches (which we will visit in the future).

The doors on the Windsor Locks Canal are described in the gallery. You can click on any photo to start a slide show, in which the full captions will be revealed.

Thursday Doors is a weekly fun blogfest organized by Norm Frampton. If you’re interested in enrolling in the school of doors, head to the Principal’s office. Pay appropriate homage to the Principal’s doors, lest he give you detention, and then check with his assistant (she looks a bit like a blue frog) for directions and a Hall Pass to enter the Auditorium where the rest of the doors are on display.

63 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Town-ish Doors

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  1. I love that selfie you caught, Dan! I could have gone without the autumn foliage though, to be truthful with you. That will be here soon enough, thank you! You have yourself a great day today! As usual, loved your gallery. I noticed on the red auditorium doors that they are not hanging plum. Or is it square? Not sure of the correct vernacular on that one. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh yes my eyes do see a lot and many times what I would rather not see. I do know some carpentry terminology just hanging with hubby and from when we built our home in the 80’s. I do have a perfection streak as well when it comes to doing things right. And those doors were not hung properly, simple as that, unless the building shifted. That could be too. :)

        Liked by 1 person

  2. That reflection photo is PERFECT and perfectly beautiful! I love reflection selfies of other people, though they are pesty when they happen to ME. Yes, that town hall looks EXACTLY like a school. I wouldn’t be able to walk into it without struggling to recall my times tables.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Marian. I’m running late today. Maybe that’s tardy. I’ll be around your place later. I’m glad people like the reflection. I hope you’re referring to the nature reflections as beautiful. 9 times 8 is…???

      Like

  3. I like your wiggly door selfie :)
    It DOES look like a school, yessir! I really like those interior shots with the arched windows and the old bricks of usta be. Dig the black and white tiles of yore as well.
    I’m glad you have back-ups. Collateral damage is all over my drafts! Heh.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Yes, it does indeed remind me of a school. Like Amy, I too noticed the auditorium doors weren’t hanging straight. They remind me of every cabinet door in my kitchen. Someday ….

    I love all the photos of the lock and around the canal. It looks like a wonderful place to explore – especially in the fall with the glorious colours. As a sidebar, I wonder if this year will be a banner year for fall colours because of all the rain we’ve had this summer? Or is it the other way around and it needs dry conditions? I never remember.

    Anyway, I’ve never understood the “Back in 5 minutes” sign on a door. First of all, what can anyone possibly do in 5 minutes or less? … and when exactly did that 5 minutes begin? Did I arrive 30 seconds after you left, or did you leave 10 minutes ago and are already overdue?

    So many questions to ponder …

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The canal is a very pretty place to walk/bike. I haven’t been yet this year but I will get there. Last year, we had great colors but they came in stages. I’m hoping this is a nice year. I think it also needs either fast or gradual cooling. I never remember that either.

      You’re right about the 5-minutes sign. You never really know.

      I guess i need to tell them to did those doors.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I just wish there was some history that was easy to find. It is my town :(

      There are some books in the library. I guess I need to go old school if I want information about the old school :)

      Like

  5. Geesh, Dan, I totally forgot about Thursday doors until I sat down to soak my feet and review blog emails. Well, good things come to those who wait or forget. This is great for a back-up plan. The canal area is just lovely, especially in fall. It looks like a place where you could sit for a while on a warm fall day and breathe in the air and smell of leaves.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The bridge, water reflection. and railroad give a good indication of how beautiful that area is! Inside it looks like a school should look: homey! For collateral damage, this is a great post, Dan:)

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh, I know another area like it where houses in the streets stand however and where ever they want – it’s in the old part of Jackson, half an hour from there they live, and as it looks like, still from the Goldrush era, It really looks “weird.”

        Liked by 1 person

  7. If this is what you call going off the rails, then you certainly made one heck of a save Dan. Love the selfie (doorfie?) shot too.
    For the record, though there are a few contributors who are on my naughty list for frequently forgetting to use the link-up and making it harder to find their posts, I have yet to send anyone to detention ;-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Norm. I try to be good. Your list seems to forget sometimes, what time zone it’s in. It opens an hour behind schedule. Still plenty of time to get out there (I don’t want to be on your naughty list).

      It’s funny, I had to go in and see the First Selectman. He’s an elected official, so I should feel fine walking into his office, but that “uh oh, now I’ve done it” feeling came over me pretty quickly.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Beautiful images of buildings and doors! The town hall in first premier place was brick with white trim and a sweet window, too. The red building by the tracks is really pretty and a great shot, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Robin. The canal service building by the tracks was taken several years ago at the midpoint of a Photo365 project. I really like that building and I was happy with it. There is something classic about brick and white trim.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is true, classic beauty to me is when the details stand out among the stones or brick! The traditional college campus of University of Dayton or Harvard remind me of this. I saw people mentioning schools (I agreed the building looked very school like!) and I was sad since once my grandies go back, a little less time to just run around haphazardly. . . 🌞 Shortening of days, too.

        Liked by 1 person

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