Thursday Doors – PA Trolley Doors

I really like this trolley entrance.

On our recent visit to Pittsburgh, we made a last-minute diversion to the Pennsylvania Trolley Museum near Washington, PA. Truth be told, we always referred to Washington as “Little Washington” so as not to confuse it with Washington, D.C. I guess we weren’t concerned about Washington state. Anyway, we had a few extra hours, so a ride, a tour and a lot of trollies.

So many trollies, that I have more door photos than will fit today. I’ll do my best to describe them in the gallery (click to start a slide show and see the captions). I’ll finish-up on a future Thursday when I have time to toss in a little information about the museum. I’m still playing catch-up with this week.

Thursday Doors is product of Canada where doors are imported from around the world by Norm Frampton, Limited. If you want to view the current inventory, head to Norm’s showroom. Look at the doors on the main floor, then click on the blue frog for access to the warehouse. If you have doors to share, the frog will hook you up.

86 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – PA Trolley Doors

Add yours

    1. Thanks for the laugh, Judy. Yeah, my wife says “you have to get down lower sometimes for a good photo” and I just wonder…

      The tour guide told us that a man bought two old trolley cars and turned them both into cabins. Clever.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I think that’s why I like seeing these so much, Jennie. The craftsmanship involved in making them and the degree of detail that they added. They were still trying to make money, but that really wanted to give the rider a great experience.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. So much to comment on!
    1) LOVE this week’s intro to Norm’s Thursday Doors. You have such a knack for fun writing :)
    2) the first photo of the baggage door with the old trunk in front is my favourite. That old trunk reminds me of the one my mom had when she immigrated from Holland after the war.
    3) great photo of the interior of the trolley. Love all that wood seating … probably not overly comfortable though.
    4) I can’t help but brag – I can still get down like Faith to get a photo. Somehow I suspect she does it with considerably more grace though ;)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Joanne. The baggage door is a favorite. I wasn’t aware of how much trollies were used for freight. The seats were surprisingly comfortable.

      As for point number 4, I’d say you clearly have bragging rights. Graceful or not, if you can do it, I applaud you.

      Like

  2. Bravo! I think I like trolleys as much as you love trains, although am not able to indulge myself that often. I am happy to say I got to ride a trolley, movie style, in San Francisco once. There are trolleys in NOLA but that is usually a very hot, sticky affair. Still, the are so magical to me. Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have a personal connection with trolleys, as I used to ride into the city with my mom. I was pleasantly surprised to hear (at the museum) that Pittsburgh’s current mass transit system (The T) is actually a trackless trolley. It’s now on my list of things I want to do the next time we visit.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I think that’s what I am most impressed with. These cars had a rough life, and they held up very well to the elements AND they looked great. During the tour, we learned about the utilitarian aspects, but it was so cool to see how they managed to still make it visually appealing.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Laura. Seriously, being a mule in Pittsburgh had to be the worst job ever! The car alone is heavy, and the hills are steep and frequent. Personally, I’d like the trolley car that was made into a private car for the owner. I could live in that.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Those are beautiful and interesting doors, and history! I love the Trolley’s! I admit I now have the ding-ding of Mr. Roger’s Trolley in my head. :)

    That Trolley that needed pulling by horses or mules is a gem! They must have been some big mules, or Clydesdale type horses.

    We have old trolleys in San Francisco, they’re electric now. I just love their curved lines and contours and lovely shades of green and yellow, and of course the Cable Cars. The workmanship in those interiors is exquisite!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Mr. Rogers is a Pittsburgh export to the larger community, too. I was never surprised to see him as a lover of trolleys. I wouldn’t want to be the mule that had to pull that trolley up those hills. There were times I worried about the electric trolleys not being up to the task. I love the craftsmanship in those older cars.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m sure Mr. Rogers fell in love with the trolley’s in Pittsburgh and had to include one in his “neighborhood”. The Trolley, and his field trips were my favorite parts of his program. :)

        Gosh, I hope they had 4 or 6 mules or horse to pull that car! A full load would be hard labor…going uphill torture!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. “The frog will hook you up” bwaaaaa – laughing my butt off :-D
    I can still bend down like that but my knees snap, crackle, and pop on the way down. Then there’s figuring out the getting back up part which is way more challenging than it used to be.
    Nice selection of trolleys and doors. The tiny trolley out on the grass is just adorable. Fun post Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. The trolley doors are delightful, Dan! I have had very few trolley rides in my lifetime, but I enjoyed each and every one. They have a trolley (not on a track) here in Appleton if you ever get this way and want a tour of the downtown and neighboring areas. Thanks for a fun post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to figure out a way to get out there, Mary. Riding the trolley into downtown with my mom is one of my favorite memories with her. I spent way more time with my dad, and he always drove everywhere. If you were traveling with my mom, you would choose trolley over her driving, any day of the week.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Vivky. They changed over time. The trolleys in the museum are from late 1800s to about the 1950s – 60s. They evolved a bit, but there’s a lot of similarity and still they all seem unique.

      Like

  6. Hi Dan – looks fun … lovely to have the carriages preserved for people to see … and what a great extra diversion to your trip … cheers Hilary

    Like

  7. Splendid doors today, Dan! I shall sing “clang, clang, clang went the trolley” the rest of the evening now! Heh.
    I love the yellow custom one, but then I love the gray weathered one with the smooth wooden doors on the back or front, and then your ride :)
    Also, that old baggage! Niiiiiice!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I liked your lead off picture with the sign, “Safety Always.” The nice antique trunk on the step up into another trolley was really a nice set up for a picture opportunity. The best part was you knew the young woman taking her own photo, Dan. ;)
    Gosh, I liked the Westview 10 photograph with the tour guide in his trolley cap, like an engineer might wear. My Mom used to ride an electric trolley from Middletown down to Cincinnati. It is more than a 30 mile stretch. Just wondering how long a trolley route might run in distance?

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I think it would be cool for me to try and find a photo of the Middletown to Cincinnati electric trolley. Thanks for helping me to picture this scene of Mom getting on an electric trolley to get to college at U of Cincy. 😊 I bet if there were an upcoming test, she may have been studying her notes.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Great display of trolleys! The orange one almost looks like a train! In Holland there are more tams than trolleys. My son who lives in the Hague, has his room right (2nd story, so it’s no that noisy) in front of a tram. He kind of likes it.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Such fun, Dan! I liked seeing inside the trolley you rode. And the little bitty one is too cute. However, I’m infatuated with the yellow one. :D Hmmm… maybe my faery-verse needs a yellow trolley…
    Have a wonder-filled weekend. Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

Add your thoughts. Start or join the discussion. Sadly, links require moderation.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: