Thursday Doors – Chicago Part-1

Willoughby Tower. Don’t get off the tour at this stop.

This is a hard post to figure out. First, as I mentioned in an earlier post, I was only in Chicago for 24 hours. More than enough time to snap some door pics, have a few beers, two nice meals and walk my butt off while freezing my butt off, but not long enough to pay attention to details. Details like: “what building is that?” and “What street are we on?” and “Does the wind ever stop?

Second, one of the buildings in the gallery, The Wrigley Building, has kinda-sorta already been featured by Joanne Sisco in a blog post memory of her visit to Chicago, when she was running a marathon. I’m tempted to point out the relative ease of running a marathon compared to sampling 12 different lagers (flights, people – small glasses) during one meal and then finding your way back to a hotel at the corner of somewhere and something, but I’ll be nice. Besides, I’d lose that comparison, because Joanne also wrote about a different Wrigley building, on two different occasions, here and here.

Third, these are doors from Janet’s city. She knows way more about Chicago doors than I do, and she participates in Thursday Doors (that’s an old link. I’ll update it later if she posts today). I feel a little weird showing doors from her place, but she’s a good sport.

Finally, the door I chose to feature is the Willoughby Tower. Maybe some of my door-buddies won’t get that connection, but regular reader and Twilight Zone guru of gurus, Paul will instantly understand my temptation. Fortunately, Paul has already written about Willoughby.

The friend I was visiting knows about this blog, and he knows about Thursday Doors, but he also knew precisely how much time we had to get to the Chicago Architecture Foundation to begin our walking tour. He is nothing if not prompt. And I am nothing if not appreciative, so I wasn’t about to cause us to be late. So, I have doors. Doors to buildings unknown, and doors to buildings known only by reference courtesy of Messer’s Google and Wikipedia. Still, they are doors from a day that still makes me smile when I think about it. Note: none of today’s doors are from the walking tour. I’m saving that for another post. Oh, and there’s a picture of Maddie in the mix, because, some people – I’m not naming names, Pam – seem to come here expecting to see the dopey red head.

This post is part of a weekly blogfest orchestrated and managed by Norm Frampton. Each week, Norm opens the door to a master gallery of doors, OK, it’s a Linky List, where door aficionados from around the world gather to share their doors. If you have a door to share, visit Norm’s site. Check out his doors and look for the blue frog. That little guy will lead you to the list. Add your link and you’re good to go.


92 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – Chicago Part-1

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  1. Wow. The Tribune Building. Now I’d love to step inside there. And just how ling did you stay in the architecture building? 😉I love the National Louis University doors. All of them are great! You are such a devoted doors poster Dan. Nice walk, but where ih where are those flights and good food that warmed you up? 🤔

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Cheryl. We were in the Railway Express building about 15 minutes, just long enough to look around and get our headsets for the walking tour. The link at the top will take you to the story of those beers, but I don’t think there’s many food pics.

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  2. Ha, yes, I certainly do understand your desire to snap pics at Willoughby Tower, Dan. Thanks for the link and the shout-out!

    It’s a shame your time was so limited and the weather that cold, because Chicago is home to so many iconic buildings. The Tribune building in particular is a real work of art. It’s fancier and more ornate than even many old-school churches.

    Great pics today — thanks for braving the deep chill to snap them for us!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Paul. I couldn’t help bu feature that building. Given that my friend no longer works for our company, I think there will be more visits to Chicago in the future. He loves to walk, and he knows the city so well. I hope to be able to find those doors.

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  3. The windy city has a lot of beautiful gold doors! Now Dan, us dopey red heads have to stick together. Maybe I’m especially dopey today but I didn’t see your girl! It’s ok, we understand. Boy have their toys.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Pam. You know, I think it’s the red heads in the tribe that cut Maddie the most slack. I don’t always have a good way to fit her in the mix of photos. I’ll be sure to add her to the gallery on Saturday. I can’t promise to slip her into the #WATWB post tomorrow (but that’s an extra post, so…).

      Liked by 1 person

  4. One of my favorite big cities to visit. So much to see and do and no shortage of interesting architecture and of course: Doors!
    That Art Institute garage door is the fanciest garage door I’ve ever seen. Some awesome finds in this collection Dan. I’m looking forward to seeing what else you came back with :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Norm. The walking tour was fun, but we moved along quickly and I’m not sure what I managed to come away with for doors. I’ll feature them in a couple of weeks.

      I enjoyed my visit and I hope to get back there soon, maybe for a Pirates v Cubs game. I’d love to see a game at Wrigley.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. It sure would be difficult to pick a favorite out of this crop of pictures, Dan. Obviously Chicago has its fair share of interesting and unique doors. But I have to say, I really like the scale model of Chicago in the RR Exchange!
    And who says Pam is the only one who looks for Maddie?!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I like the model too. I know that a lot of people are looking for Maddie. I was just making the red head connection, but maybe I’m over-estimating that. In any case, you all have to wait until Saturday, unless I cave to the pressure.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Wow Dan. I’m seriously impressed with your memory. Even I had to go back to that post from 2 years ago to remind myself of what exactly it was about. Thanks for not one, but 3 links!

    I would love to go back to Chicago for exactly the reason you’ve shown in this post – there is just so much to see … but trying to pick a favourite door? That’s hard. The elevator door at the Railway Exchange Building is a great one, as is the entrance to the Juicy Fruit headquarters, but where’s Maddie?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh my – another one looking for the red head. She’s asleep on my couch in the family room, probably curled up in my pillows!

      As soon as I saw the name plate, I remembered your posts about the Wrigley building, Joanne and I remembered that you got to go inside! That’s the best thing that can happen to a door person. I was so happy to find that our destination was inside the Railway Exchange. When our tour was over, they mentioned that they will be moving in 2018. I’m not sure how the tours will change once they start from the new location.

      Maddie will return to No Facilities – soon, I promise.

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  7. What beautiful doors, Dan. My older son was stationed in Chicago so I loved seeing these doors to some of the places we visited. A beer flight is 12 glasses? Yikes, wine flights served here are only 3. I think we’ve been gypped!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Fantastic collection of doors….and buildings. The scale model of Chicago is awesome and so is the Tribune building. So glad you endured all those beers and wind and freezing temperatures to share your day with us. Lol.

    I was all psyched to see Maddie. Sigh. I think Maddie should have her own blog. She’ll pose for all the photos and you would be the silent author. After all, you don’t have much else to do, right?!! Post it once a month…maybe Maddie’s Minute or Redheads Are Us. *Ginger*

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. I guess I blew it bigtime by not including Maddie in yesterday’s post. She doesn’t really fit in a Doors post. I have a special post for #WATWB tomorrow (last Friday in January) but I don’t know if Maddie will be featured. I promise to include her in Saturday’s post – promise.

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  9. Dan – I am fairly sure that Maddie was on the Polar Express train ( not the Willoughby train ) dreaming about the next snow storm and the return of Mt. Maddie. Could it be the Maddie Horn ? I enjoyed the walking tour of Chicago doors. And I am very glad I did not have to do a 24 hour whirlwind tour of Chicago to see them in person. So anyway back to dreaming on trains. Throwing in the alternate universe with multiple planes factor I would disagree. Several Maddies were in this post. And they all want you to start working on the next Mt. Maddie Horn soon. Hurry they are about to get off the train…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks John. I’m not getting off the train on a post that references Willoughby, lest I end up face up in the snow. Maddie got her own post today, and I’m sure the Maddiehorn is also in her future (I like that name).

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Based on the Willoughby Tower, I’d say you spent some time on Michigan Avenue. Lots of good doors around there. Not that I noticed them much… I used to work in the Wrigley Building, so I’ve seen those doors a lot, anyway.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly, John. We walked down Michigan Ave. from my hotel to the Railway Express to start our tour. I love big cities. On any given walk, it’s click-click-click (door-door-door). I think I’ll be going back to Chicago at some point for another visit with my friend.

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  11. Oh my, with doors like this I don’t mind missing Maddie (even though I saw that you added another post). And I never mind if there is no historical info or any info whatsoever. A fine door is a fine door is a fine door. For me, the elevator, the Tribune Building and the Old Republic are the finest.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Thanks for including National Louis University! I work here, and I have to tell you it is a pleasure to walk through those doors in the morning. The building was built in 1910-11 for the People’s Gas Company, which is the heating company. I know doors are your thing, but also fascinating is the extensive use of beautiful white marble with gray veins throughout the building. It even covers all the stairwells–luxury in an unexpected place!

    Liked by 2 people

  13. My favorite doors are those at National Louis University. I love that teal patina with the brass. Swoon! The design is lovely too, and those elevator doors in another building were stunning. I really liked that floor indicator above the doors. What’s its proper name?

    I missed Maddie too, but read your posts out of order so saw her. Loved that image with her in the grass with her ball. She’s a pretty girl.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you liked these doors, Deborah. I saw your comments on the pictures but I can’t respond from my phone. I appreciate those.

      I don’t know what that indicator is called (I’ll be looking that up soon) but I fo like it. Did you see the comment (above) from the woman who works at the university? It sounds like a beautiful building inside too.

      Maddie is a pretty girl. She’s going to get a big head, but she is pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Great collection! A few of those are iconic for me :) I don’t care whose city it is, next I’m there, snappin those pics! Spring for me. And god willing, a train. Wind, mmhm.
    I see now what you mean about the Maddie photo.
    Some flights are better than others. *hopes you smiled at pun*

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That did make me smile :)

      You’re right about snapping pics wherever and whenever. Doors always look different anyway. Sun, clouds, angles, it’s all a bunch of variables.

      A train? Oh, I hope that works for you. Must post if it does, and get pics.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. First, I love the ambience of the last door frame – a very distinct style! Second, after reading your post, I had kind of a crooked smile, because you name a good amount of people and posts, but not the the doors you showed today!
    Like to know what prompted you to choose these – were they all in the same street, or was it doors in a historic part, or what? Whatever stuck out would be interesting enough, because it’s your blog:):)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. These were all on the walk between my hotel and the Railway Exchange Building (which was our destination). I could only name the ones that had name plates or addresses I could look up, because we were in such a hurry. I found a bunch of information on the Railway Exchange Building, but this was a busy week, so I decided to go with a shorter post.

      When I realized that I had the Wrigley Building, I had to mention Joanne, because of the number of times she wrote about that.

      The tag line here is “random thoughts…” so, I guess I’m OK.

      Like

      1. Everything you write is OK, because it’s your blog:):)
        Can imagine that you are an easy-going person, but I was kind of asking for I (Dan) like …I don’t like …. I (Dan) hate purple … my (Dan) preference …. etc., because I could not decipher it. Sorry I wasn’t clear enough.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Jennie. There is so much going on in Chicago, I always forget how big it is and how much history is standing there. I love walking around, especially when I’m with someone who knows what we’re looking at.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. You got a great selection in 24 hours, Dan. I love the architecture. My husband was in Chicago about thirty years ago and said it was windy then, too. I suppose Annie Oakley felt a draft when she was there – if the song from the musical is anything to go by. ;)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha – thanks Jean. I guess it’s always windy, because a lot of the buildings are designed with the prevailing winds in mind. You can see a lot in Chicago in a short period, but there is so much more to see.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s so easy to get great door pics in a big city. There are so many more buildings to see. The walking tour we took was one of about seven that they offer (and today’s pics aren’t from that tour). I’ve been to Chicago a few times, but this was the first time since I’ve been doing Thursday Doors.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Oh, I love revolving doors! They scared the heck out of me when I was little, though. There are some mighty impressive doors in this collection, but my very favoite are the elevator doors

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do like revolving doors, and I really did like those elevator doors. I like places that do something interesting with elevators instead of just having blah metal slabs in the wall. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Wow, great finds, Dan! That revolving door really stands out from the building, literally! And the restaurant has separate doors for breakfast and lunch (wonder how you enter for brunch) ;) I will have to visit Chicago, preferably not in the winter or summer! Great post!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Chicago and New York are among the most popular cities that you will find in Indian mainstream movies. So in a way, I have travelled Chicago virtually like I have toured Hartford through your blog posts. Chicago is a beautiful city, no doubt. However, 24 hours seems like a very small window to explore it. The pictures are incredibly good.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Oh my! I already love the Willoughby Tower, Dan! The gold filigree design in the curved glass transom windows and the carved letters and columns just make this such a grand building.
    The National Louis University and the golden doors for the Chicago Architecture Foundation are just a few which stand out in their immensely attractive presentation. I liked the international doors too.
    You could separate these and we would have been thrilled for months. 😊 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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