Mean People Should Stay Home – #1linerWeds

I’ve been pondering the title for three days. Ever since I had the unpleasant experience of overhearing the following “conversation:”

Where are the warm rolls? They’re supposed to be served with dinner entrees?

We’re actually still serving lunch. They don’t start heating rolls until after 5:00

She offered to bring him some rolls.

The customer at the table yelled to the bartender: “I need to speak with a manager.”

The customer complained to the manager about the waitress’s attitude. The manager explained that the waitress was right, and that there aren’t warm rolls at 3:00. The man was upset about the restaurant being cheap. The manager explained that the lunch portions are smaller, less complicated and quite a bit cheaper, and that if he wanted rolls, he could have them but if he wanted warm rolls, he would have to wait for them to get warm.

The man insisted on warm rolls.

When the waitress took them over, he complained that there were only four rolls. The waitress explained that they normally serve two rolls per person, but she offered to bring more and asked how many more he wanted. Two more warm rolls were ordered, prepared and delivered.

Note: If I wanted rolls, warm rolls, more rolls or buttered rolls, I would, as I was taught, ask politely if I could please have a roll, two rolls, or four rolls. If I wanted more than that, I’d go to Olive Garden.

One last tidbit – when the man and his companion left the restaurant, there were three uneaten rolls on the plate and no tip on the credit card slip. I left the waitress the missing tip. She thanked me and said:

“I feel sorry for him. I only had to put up with him for an hour. He has to live with himself forever.”


This post is part of Linda G. Hill’s fun weekly series One-Liner Wednesday. If you have a one-liner, I’d encourage you to join in on the fun. You can follow this link to participate and to see the one-liners from the other participants.

89 thoughts on “Mean People Should Stay Home – #1linerWeds

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  1. There are people who shouldn’t eat in restaurants, and I’ve known several of them. When we use to go to dinner with one couple, it was a given that something related to her meal was going to be sent back. It was almost like a power thing to show who was in charge. Another lady I know, questions items but in the end doesn’t send them back. Why the need for questions every time, if you already know you are going to accept it. But, the latest is a woman I know who wants water not only with no ice but that is warm. It sends the wait person over the edge trying to figure out what exactly is warm water. I’m sorry, but a restaurant has a menu, and if you can’t adhere to the menu stay home and fix whatever and however you want. Applause to you for leaving the tip because it is not the worker bee’s fault that customers have developed some crazy sense of entitlement because they are paying for a meal prepared and served by someone other than themselves. My theory is if it’s not my last meal on earth, go with the flow. Whew – I bet you’re sorry I didn’t just hit like and keep going. :-)

    Liked by 5 people

    1. On the contrary, Judy. I like this comment a lot. I worked one year in food service, and I was berated by a customer for enforcing a policy that our manager had drilled into me, not 2 hours earlier. Of course, the manager took the customer’s side. I think that’s why I gave this girl the tip.

      I used to work for a man that would send food back with specific instructions to give the chef, He once complained so much about a pizza that we were sharing, that I wen to the counter and told the manager: “I work for that bozo, but I don’t agree with him.”

      Liked by 3 people

  2. The grouch must surely be insecure to need that much attention over rolls. (or whatever excuse he chose.) I hope the companion wasn’t a life-partner, because that dinner was certainly a red flag!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It was hard to tell who the companion was. It was a woman, but she remained quiet. Not that I would ever throw such a hissy fit, but if I did, my wife would be standing with the waitress and tossing me out.

      Liked by 3 people

  3. I agree with the waitress and Les about having the right attitude. I’m sure that she has come across other difficult people and has learned to not take their bad behavior personally. I always wonder why some people live with an angry or rude demeanor because it must be so tiring and unhappy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wonder the same thing Mary. If you aren’t happy, it just seems like life would drag on endlessly. The waitress really made me smile when she said that. It bothers me when people are mean or rude to waitstaff, or anyone providing a service, but this waitress twisted it around a bit.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, Frank. I had such an experience when I was 17, working for a caterer, and I still remember it. I think it’s part of the reason I felt bad for this waitress, in addition to the fact that this guy was just being a jerk.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. The beauty and creativity of your photography constantly delight and surprise me. –And the happiness of Maddie always does my heart good. As the daughter of someone who has worked food service and the mother of another, THANK YOU for leaving the missing tip. The waitress had a great attitude, but a great attitude don’t feed the bulldog, as a friend of mine says.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Thanks Marian. I’m glad you like the photos. I learned my lesson last week, so I snapped a couple quick pics of Maddie, even though they are a bit off-topic.

      Given that waitstaff and bartenders in CT are allowed to be paid less than minimum wage, to deny them a tip for something that isn’t their fault, irks me. I shouldn’t have to pay some bozo’s tip, but the waitress was right – let him be in a bad mood, giving her the tip made me feel good. Hearing her response made me feel great! He saved a few dollars, but he went home miserable.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I wonder what the man is going to say to St. Peter at the Pearly Gates? “I want to complain to your boss!” He’ll probably complain that Hell is too hot and he wants warm rolls. That waitress is a wise woman.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. He sounds like the kind of person that restaurants wish would go somewhere else. If I had been the waitress, I’d’ve poured hot coffee in his lap. Then he’d probably bitch that it wasn’t hot enough.

    New look? I like it!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. What a jerk that guy was… I’ve seen too many people like him. They have to do something like that to feel powerful, I guess. The waitress has a great attitude.
    I’m glad you made it work out. I tried my version of that once and failed miserably. LOL. I was at lunch with a friend and her mother. They left what I felt was an embarrassingly low tip. But I didn’t want to say anything! Seeing the coins on the table I deliberately left my comb on the seat. When we got to the car I “went back for my comb” intending to sneak more of a tip onto the table. I stopped at the desk to make sure the waitress was still there. Then tried to discretely put more money on the table. *Everyone accused me of trying to take that insufficient tip! Even my friend’s mother!* Sigh… I just can’t get anything right. LOL…
    I love the pic of Maddie cuddling her toy. Hugs!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I have tried and failed at the “let me make that tip better” action, Teagan. This was easy. I just gave some money to the bartender and asked her to give it to the waitress.

      I don’t know what it is about people like this guy. I’ve known several guys like this, and I no longer hang out with any of them. The waitress had the right attitude, but like Marian said, it still hurts financially.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. What a mean-spirited jerk this guy is. I guess it’s true…misery loves company because he certainly tried to make those around him miserable. All this over warm rolls? You can’t make this stuff up. Cheers to the waitress who remained calm, polite and accommodating. And hugs to you for leaving her the tip she so richly deserved.

    Love the photos today, especially of the Connecticut Capitol. Looks like a castle!

    But the pix of Maddie…..perfect way to start my day!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. I knew better than to leave Maddie out. I really like our Capitol building. It looks particularly nice from the parking lot that sits below it.

      Yes, all this fuss over warm rolls. There were so many ways to handle that – “excuse me, I love those warm rolls you guys serve at dinner. Any chance I could get one now?” And then leave a NICE tip when the waitress agreed.

      Like

    1. I’ve seen this happen several times. Once, our bartender was serving a party of 32 in the lower lounge. After 2 hours, they tipped her $10 on a huge bill (restaurants in CT are no longer allowed to include a minimum gratuity). Several of us sitting at the bar chipped in to give her a proper tip. I will never understand this kind of behavior. Thanks Audrey.

      Like

  9. The server was right. That guy has to live miserably his entire life. Why am I not surprised you paid the tip? Your gestures far outweigh the rudeness of others. When I experience guys like that I thank my stars they don’t live with me. Good post, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks John. I’ve been in that waitress’s shoes, and I know how it feels to get stiffed. I wish Tiny worked at this bar, I wanted someone to force-feed those last three rolls to that guy. I think when you can make up for others’ rude behavior, you remind people that those people are the exceptions.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. The waitress is right. This poor fellow must live in a terribly unsatisfactory world, not realizing that he creates his own reality, and, unfortunately, he carries it wherever he goes. What we look for is what we find and he’s become adept and finding fault. While it would be unpleasant to wait on him, or even watch him, how much worse to BE him!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. “What we look for is what we find” – I like that, Donna. I can only imagine what it’s like to be that miserable. An hour or so in a nice place, with a friend/family member, eating good food – it should be the bright spot in the day. This guy makes it gloomy. Thanks for the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Although I was a bartender in university, I’ve never worked in food service or retail. I don’t think my skin is thick enough to handle people like this. I’d be going home every night in tears.

    omg Dan, you are clearly one of the good guys to leave the missing tip. If I had to guess, this person acts like an entitled jerk because he otherwise feels unhappy and powerless in life, so exercises it over others in service situations.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Joanne. I never worked table service or in a bar, but I served food on a Party Liner river cruise. I had customers complain to my boss when I was following his instructions. I had to listen to the customer and then my boss, who would always take the customer’s side and try to console me later.

      I will never understand people who act this way, but if I can help show that they are the exceptions, I will try. It was worth it to see her smile and to hear that remark.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I agree with what’s been said before me. The waitress has a great attitude. You’re amazing for leaving the tip!

    I love your foggy low light images. So moody, and mysterious, and the Capitol bldg. looks like a palace! I love that time of day; blue hour.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Deborah. These are easy gestures to make, and I think they go a long way. Her attitude really is amazing. I had never thought about it like that.

      I like taking pictures in the fog and during that time of day. The parking lot I was in is perfect, It’s elevated a little to the city, but lower than the Capitol.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Ahh, yes, the joys of serving the public. We get people like that in the shop sometimes. Not much you can do except your best. I love the server’s attitude, though. She had her priorities right and so did you. Kudos to you both.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet. I’m not sure how these people live with themselves, but I guess the waitress is right, that’s their problem. I can’t fix everything, but this was easy. Not much different than buying a drink for a friend. Judging by her smile, I’d say it was money well spent.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Hi D – I wish I had time to read the comments here cos this is a fun post! maybe later I can –
    and never go to Olive garden – not even for bread or rolls- esp. not for that – just kidding – but ulk.

    and you did grab a piece of society here – we call it demandingness –
    although in my opinion – rolls should be warm – how much could it be to heat them for lunch ??

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “demandingness” I like that. It certainly describes this guy. They serve a lot of burgers at lunch. I don’t know why they have the menu they do, but there was no reason to stiff the waitress.

      Like

  15. I worked in food service for many years pre- during- and post-college and I wish I had been as zen-like and mature as that waitress when faced with a mean customer. I, unfortunately, would let it bother me for the rest of my shift. People like that man probably go through life thinking that the world is scheming against them and that they need to constantly make sure no one is taking advantage of them. What a sad way to live.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have to share something that happened today. I had just come home for work. Maddie jumped up on the bed and put her front legs on my shoulders. Standing there, face-to-face, she sneezed ! Yuck, uck, uck.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m endeared to that waitress like whoa. How wise. Mean people SHOULD stay home.
    I love the comments here, too. I waited tables briefly. I am a terrible waitress. Not in skill, but in that way that I’d rather be shuckin corn or scrubbin toilets cause Oh, People, No. lol
    I always love your lights in the dark. Bridges, lights, river…Ooh! I think Paris may need you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aw, I like your comment! I think she has the best attitude, ever for working with people, cause there’s always some like this guy. I’m glad you like the pictures. Sunrise is coming earlier, so the darkness pics will go away for a while. I do like them, and I really like the fog.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. At my very first job a 3-star hotel, I had a rough experience with the Regional Manager of the State Bank of India (India’s largest public sector bank). He was upset I brought the food to his room late and that it was cold. I was new, and therefore slow at things. He yelled at me and I apologized for being late and said that I will take the food and get him fresh food again, this time it won’t be cold, but he said get out of the room and slammed the door on my face. I was sad, but a few days later he ordered again and I was on the duty. This time I gave him a good service, on time, fresh food, and a little small talk. I told him that I was a trainee and hence I was late the previous time. He realized it (although he never said sorry) but he would always ask for me to provide service. Yeah, but sometimes you gotta handle mean people with a smiling face.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re right, Sharukh, but it’s hard. Chances are good that the food was cold when you left the kitchen with it. I know it’s easy to snap at the person making the delivery, but they usually aren’t the ones who prepared the food or made the decisions about price and quality.. I’m glad you were able to make it better. Thanks for sharing that story.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The food was hot I know for sure. The problem was my inexperience. I wasn’t given a trolley, so I actually carried the entire huge tray up to the 7th floor. The kitchen was at the ground floor. Since I was walking with the tray in my hand around my shoulder it was wobbling a bit and I was scared I would lose control. So I was walking at snail’s pace. The air conditioning in the hotel also played its role to cool off the food. It was a memorable experience probably because it was officially my first rough experience in the real world. I was only 18 back then and that slamming-the-door-on-my-face was a big humiliating experience for me, but it only made me mature.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. I was a waitress off and on for many years from age 15 on up till my four last years’ of waiting tables at Cracker Barrel. It helped pay for the classes up till the last year of my Master’s degree. Boy! People are harsh! I had several amazing ones, though. . . Two teens who left me twenty dollars. Four servicemen who put a ten dollar bill under each of their plates.
    The teacher and her husband who asked for my table every Friday night for their fish fry dinners who told me they were leaving tips on their credit card we’re Not credit card “savvy.” We can “see” as they pay up in the gift shop their non-existent tips. I never said a word but walked slower and did less coffee, biscuits and butter refills. She knew my kids as a teacher and I had served as a sub for her many times before I changed age groups (from middle school down to preschool with special ed children). 🤔

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The waitress told me that the vast majority of her customers are great. She said that guy was bad news from the moment he walked in “it was like he wanted to be mad about something.”

      Like

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