Thursday Doors – St. Augustine Sweat

This is a side door to the Cathedral. I like the stark contrast of this door and the wall. The sundial is a nice touch.

Visiting St. Augustine, Florida involves flying into either Jacksonville or Daytona Beach, or connecting to a little airline flying scary little planes. I flew into Jacksonville, and I was kinda smug when I texted the temperature to my wife. It was 77°f (25°c) in Jacksonville but it was 92°f (33°c) in Connecticut – Ha! Well, the joke was on me.

I drove to St. Augustine (about an hour) and parked my car at the indoor lot of the hotel. I had plenty of time before my evening meeting started so, after checking email and uncrumpling my clothes, I went for a walk. That’s when it hit me. Like – a – brick! St. Augustine was about 85°f with well over 90% humidity – yuck – how do people live there?

I would have cancelled the walk, except for three things. 1) I like to get some exercise when I travel. 2) Our company is holding a walking contest, and I am on a team led by a tough task-master of a walker. “Get your steps in, Dan!” 3) Doors. I mean, I was in an area I hadn’t been in before, and there were doors. Old doors. According to St. Augustine, they are the oldest city in America. They take pride in being old, so even a lot of the modern doors have an older look to them.

45 minutes was about as much of the heat and humidity that I could take. Some of that was Florida’s fault, some was mine – I didn’t remember to pack shorts. I did manage to see many interesting doors, including a couple Dutch Doors (the Editor likes those). The heat may have affected my ability to accurately remember the history of the area. I’m pretty sure I have this right, but you might want to find a second source if you’re writing a term paper.

St. Augustine was founded on September 8, 1565, by Spanish admiral Pedro Menéndez de Avilés, Florida’s first governor. He named the settlement “San Agustín”, since his ships bearing settlers, troops, and supplies from Spain had first sighted land eleven days earlier on August 28, the feast day of St. Augustine.

Following the Spanish settlement, the French also explored the area. Captain René de Frampton sailed into St. Augustine, sketched a variety of doors, and then sailed farther up the coast and settled in what would eventually become South Carolina. It is rumored that René and his family didn’t like the climate. René’s decedents continued migrating north, to escape the heat and humidity until they reached the shores of the Saint Lawrence River. Throughout their journey, they sketched doors in every city. You can see these doors today at Norm Frampton’s gallery, just outside of Montreal. Visit the site, look around and click the blue frog – the little tadpole will get you inside.

I don’t want to go on at length about the weather, but you know it’s hot and humid, when you take the lens cover off your nice cool camera and the lens fogs up completely.

Today’s gallery has the first installment of the doors of St. Augustine. I took a lot of pictures.


89 thoughts on “Thursday Doors – St. Augustine Sweat

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  1. Annnnd now you know why all my excursions posts ended with a nice cold beer or drink and preferably at or near the breezy beaches. Oh, also why I always wore shorts or sundresses. I do so miss wearing sandals everywhere though!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I do understand the lure of shorts and sandals much better now. Jeans just don’t work in that city. I should have checked with you before I packed! I think I get one more visit to this place before I retire. Maybe I’ll remember to pack the lightweight gear.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for the tour of all these wonderful doors, architecture, hardware, and lights. But, I’m stuck on the first photo of the handsome red door. Do you have any idea what that brighter red vertical line is on the left side? It looks like it is on the hinge side, but I can’t figure out what it is. Love the sun dial. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think that’s the edge of the (open) upper portion of the door. I think the little yellow tabs are to help keep it open. I saw several Dutch Doors on this little walk, usually with the top half open.

      I’m glad you enjoyed these doors, Judy. There are many others to see in this historic district. Next year, I’ll be sure to wear shorts, a floppy hat and take along a bottle of water.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. As a European I like this city, although it is a little too touristic for me. The doors are of course a gift for a Thursday-door participant. I LOVE the cobblestone streets too. And there are a few great shops and restaurants as well. Looks like you enjoyed yourself despite the heat shock :)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Evelyne – I did enjoy the short visit. The meeting is one night and the following day, so not a lot of time for sight-seeing. I could have stayed an extra day, but I was on my way to visit family. I would like to tour the fort and the Fountain of Youth park. Maybe next year.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I loved this post, Dan. My daughter went to school at Flagler, so St Augustine is near and dear to our hearts. The Bunnery in Old St Augustine is a favorite of ours for lunch or a treat. St Augustine at Christmas is amazing–the entire downtown is lit up. They must spend a fortune on electricity. The heat….oh, yeah! It is killer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Lois. It’s a good thing Cheryl informed me that I had misspelled the name of the college – I wouldn’t want to offend. I think I could take the weather in December. I thought May would be a little early for yucky heat. I think I’ll be back one more time before I retire. Maybe I’ll get to check out a local place.

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  5. Great doors, buildings and history lesson. I love that wrap-around balcony, but only to admire, never to step foot on!! Love that building its wrapped around. The collapsing railing is another matter! Lol.

    Beautiful place, but too hot for me. Hope you get one more trip there. Have The Editor pack for you. Seriously!
    🔹 Ginger 🔹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. I think the Editor mentioned shorts. I said something stupid like “I won’t be there long enough to need shorts” – That wrap-around balcony would not see my feet, and I’m not one to be intimidated by structures. It just doesn’t look safe.

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  6. I have a friend who keeps trying to persuade me to visit St. Augustine. Your pictures almost convince me, but that heat convinces me otherwise. Oh, but those wonderful buildings and their fabulous doors! The blue-wood-arch one is a very close second, but the one with the uncertain balcony has to be my favorite!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Marian. I think the key is to avoid May-October. Maybe a nice winter visit. Lois (above) said they seem to go all out for Christmas.

      Would you step out onto the balcony? I’m normally not worried about such things, but…

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      1. Weeeellll, I’d have to have a good look at it from below. Doesn’t look like that far to fall, anyway. My cousin’s pushed me off a shed roof higher that that. Not lately, though….

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  7. Awesome post Dan!
    St. Augustine would be near the top of my list of towns in Florida to visit. The history, the architecture, the tropical colors everywhere…sigh.
    I do love those blue doors and of course dutch doors, in any color are downright wonderful. Next time, just don’t forget your shorts ;-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Norm. I do have to get smarter about packing. I figured what would be the sense of packing shorts given that I only had two hours of free time in Florida – big mistake.

      I was surprised to see the dutch doors. I guess, at the right time, the ocean breeze is comforting. It wans’t doing anything for me that day.

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  8. I love the doors (and the artistic surrounds on many of them) but I can do without the humidity, too, as well as the mosquitoes and no-see-ums that inhabit many parts of Florida. When I was quite young, my family visited St. Augustine and I have B&W photos of the fort.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet. I hope to tour the fort on one of these visits. I’ve mostly been to Florida on business, without much time to explore, other than corporate event type things. I did get to sail the harbor in St. Augustine – that was fun. We sailed by the fort and I heard the story, but I’d like to visit.

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  9. Yep… that’s southern humidity. You’d think I might have some immunity to it, being born so far south, but nooooo.
    I like the door at your hotel with the “half shell” balcony above it (that’s what I’m naming it).
    The turquoise color doors make me think of New Mexico.
    I got a kick out of the “needs TLC but it has a door.” You cracked me up with that one, Dan.
    Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Teagan! The doors are pretty, and you can name any part of them. I can’t even take the humidity in your town – it surprises me every time I come down there.

      I felt bad for that place up on piers. It’s sad to see a place like that fall into disrepair.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Dan, on behalf of the Florida Department of Tourism I extend a heartfelt whaaa, whaaa, whaaa regarding your lack of tolerance of our unseasonably humid climate. Next time you visit please put in a request for dry air. :-) We could all benefit from a little of that right now. Seriously, you did a credible job with the history lesson and I love your images. Walk over to my Blog and click on Florida to read more about the First Coast when you have time on your hands. My favorite place in St. Augustine, is the ICE House. Really cool place to have a drink, and talk about doors! The Fort is cool, but don’t waste your time on the Fountain of Youth. Cheers!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I took your challenge and visited your place, Suzanne. I’m happy to leave this at “Dear Florida, it’s not you, it’s me, but you should see other tourists and I should see other states.”

      I hope I remember the recommendations. I should get back for one more of these meetings, so I might have a chance to try a local brew house.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. I’ve never been to St Augustine but the more I learn about it (including via your gallery of doors) I think it should be added to my to-do list. I’m not sure about the humidity, though. I’m from one of those “dry heat” areas and it’s a lot easier to enjoy 85 degrees when you aren’t dripping in sweat.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The websites say, October-May are good months. Check with Suzanne (above). I prefer a dry heat, as well. We do get hot and humid days here, but usually only during a couple of horrible weeks in the summer.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. You should! I was in Savannah a long time ago. I spent my freshman year at UGA, Athens and I went home for a weekend visit with a friend. I think I was too young to appreciate the charm.

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  12. That small section of downtown St. Augustine is ripe with beautiful architecture and historical significance. My mother’s mother was from there, and ‘retired’ there as well. My mother was born there, but she is not from there, which she’s quick to tell anyone and everyone. It’s her homecoming of sorts.
    Anyway, GREAT DOORS! Gems, the lot of them.
    The building you think is a hotel is also a museum. Honestly, you can spend a week in the museums there. Orrr, I could.
    I’m with you on the heat, as I’m sure you could have guessed. My area of Georgia was an hour from Jacksonville. My body and spirit are still recovering. I only wore shorts there once. Just once. Mostly, I tried to protect my skin from the sun. I am so glad to be home.
    Is it wicked hot in CT now, too? Here, it’s as if no one thought spring would ever come and it didn’t. Summer came instead. Oof.
    Thanks for the shout-out on the lamps :)

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I figured you would understand the heat. I was wondering about the “hotel” so I guessed. Thanks for the info. I love museums, but it was see one museum, or go get some door photos and guess what they belong to. I was going to walk up and get closer but I was hot and I just couldn’t be bothered. Sometimes I think I’m still recovering from a week of freshman orientation at UGA in July. I thought I was going to die from the heat.

      We had one really got week (the week I was gone) and then 60s to 80s, which is ok.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Your pictures are truly spectacular, Dan! The doors are so mesmerizing and I would love to explore this place and to see all these spots. How many days would be enough to explore St. Augustine?

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I’m not a fan of humidity, but I’d be willing to sacrifice myself for a visit in February 🙂

    You found lots of treasures in a mere 45 minutes – and there’s more?! I’m loving all that turquoise blue and orange in the photo with the Dutch doors. It’s a bold combination and I like it 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne. There are more. I think they’ll find there way to a leftover page or a week when I’m running out of time. Maybe Thursday 😏

      I’ve been invited to this meeting in February but it’s always conflicted with our company annual meeting.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Hi Dan – it does look amazing … but I’d wilt in that heat … still you gave the walk a chance and had a look around … wonderful choices – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Ugh, I don’t do High Humidity well, but what a great place for a photowalk/doorscursion!

    I loved the college, and the Tropical Trade Winds doors and color scheme. The lamps were lovely, and so was the peach color one in the last image. :)

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Guess I forgot to visit you! Casa Monica has an impressive front! And love the bright colors here and teal fits here, except for the 90% humidity. The only time I’ve ever experienced that, was in Beijing – it’s an understatement that it’s hard to breathe with such a high humidity – even in FL it was not that bad. Enough about me – good that at least you got nice doors photos in return!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I really like the Spanish influences, white stone and black grillwork. The bridge with round towers looks like it is so impressive, up close and personal, Dan.
    The lens getting fogged up reminds me of when I used to visit my grandparents while in elementary school age, on the Gulf by Clearwater Beach and visiting Sarasota sights. . . My old Coke bottle glasses would get fogged up! 🤓
    Have a relaxing and serene Sunday! 🌄 🌞

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Robin. It is a pretty place. I’ve had that experience (glasses fogging).

      Last year, I was stuck in traffic on that bridge when the draw span opened. I remember trying to get a picture of the doors at the base of those towers.

      Like

  19. I loved the pictures. I like the way you incorporate content with pictures and at times I try to imitate in my posts (although I’m not a regular blogger). However, Sarah believes my simple conversational narrative connects better with the audience. Like yours, I have my own editor (Smiles). I think more than the heat, humidity can make things worse. Sometimes, the humidity here crosses 93% mark and that is when I take bath 3 times a day. But, there are benefits to it. The monsoon is just around the corner (it should arrive by June 10) so when it rains you enjoy it immensely. You don’t worry about floods, puddles, dirt, potholes, nothing. You just go crazy and lap up every last drop of rain to cool yourself. Only after a month down the road, the constant rainfall tends to irritate you and upset your schedule.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. 93% – yikes!

      Listen to your editor. I opted for a conversational tone that works for me. It’s natural for me, and I think that’s what works. You’re trying to connect with a specific audience, so your job is a little harder, but you write very well.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yeah, it can get very very bad, but that’s not everyday. Right now, it’s 62% but the heat factor combined can make things worse. Just before it rains things go really bad because of the atmospheric changes and clouds covering the sky which blocks the air. So, a couple of days before the rain it will feel like you’re in a microwave. Your scalp is sweaty, your armpits smell badly (if you dont bath), you’ll not feel like wearing underwear because of rashes and itchiness down there. But then…one or two spells of rain works like a circuit breaker. Everything comes back to normal.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. You’re only a hop skip and a jump from me. The good thing about St. Augustine is the breeze. Always a breeze. But we’ve had 2 straight weeks of rain a few hours away where I am. We love the beaches there though and the little town. I used to go every weekend when I could. Now it is a few times a year trip as I don’t do well with the 2 hour drive. Hoping you continue to enjoy our hot hot state!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I probably have one more visit to St. Augustine, next spring. Other than that, I probably won’t see much of Florida. It’s a great state, and I have enjoyed many visits, but I couldn’t deal with the heat for very long. Thanks for visiting and taking the time to comment.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. October-march are good times. But I think it was in the80’s on thanksgiving this year. It’s the darn humidity. I’d love to go where there is less humidity one day. Live by a lake in northcarolina maybe

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