Not Your Father’s Old Man Post

“Yes Maddie, we’re going the long way today.”

Writing the Father’s Day post about my dad got me thinking about the gazillion things that have changed since I was a kid. Hang on, before you toss this aside as one of those “old man” posts, it also caused me to think about the rapidly increasing pace of change, and the things our daughter will likely be able to talk about from when she was a kid. Most of the things that are changing today are changing due to technology. That change isn’t happening at a linear rate, but it’s Monday and I’m sure no one wants me to use the word “exponentially” (I tried that last Monday) but it truly is – that’s it – nuff-said-about-that.

Shopping – This has already changed. For good, bad or otherwise, our daughter’s generation is likely the last group of people who can say:

We had to go to stores in person. Different stores sold different things. Some stores sold a lot of different things, but some stores only sold a certain kind of thing, like shoes. And, if they didn’t have what you wanted, you had to go to a different store.”

Cars – When I explained to my wife that ours are probably the last cars we will own with an ignition key and without a back-up camera, she said she might just keep hers. Of course, our daughter will be able to say:

When I was a kid, we had to learn how to drive cars. We couldn’t even do that until we were 16, so if you had to go anywhere before that, you had to get an adult to drive you. The car couldn’t do anything on its own, it couldn’t even play music unless you brought a CD or a Cassette tape with you, or you could listen to the radio. Alexa, explain what radio was.

Appliances – We are getting ready to replace a few appliances. We’re old-school – maybe too much old-school. We don’t want to link the washer and drier to our phone. We don’t want the dishwasher talking to the electric meter and waiting until off-peak hours to start the cycle. We don’t want a trash can that opens in response to motion or voice commands and we don’t want the refrigerator ordering more food. We were late bloomers with respect to the “modern” refrigerator, so our daughter can actually say:

When I was a kid, our refrigerator just kept things cold. I remember when we got one that made its own ice. Before that, someone in our house had to fill these weird little trays with water and put them in the freezer. Sometimes, you’d open the refrigerator for a cold bottle of water, and there wouldn’t be any. We had to remember to buy the stuff that went inside.

Cables – No, not cable TV, which is a thing whose future demise I am looking forward to, no, I’m talking about all those other cables. The ones charging things and connecting things to other things, so those things can talk to other things that can upload pictures and videos and blog posts to the cloud. Our daughter still has cables in her apartment, but probably not for long. Sooner or later, she’ll be able to say:

When I was a kid, we had to connect things like phones, laptops, and cameras (I’ve told you about cameras) with cables. Everything had its own cable, until one day, someone invented USB Cables. The ‘U’ stood for universal and they almost were. They had adapters on each end, but USB adapters only fit in the socket one way. You would look at the adapter, figure out which way it fit, but then it wouldn’t go in. You’d turn it over and it still wouldn’t fit, but when you turned it back to the original way you had it, it slipped in easy-peasy.”

These aren’t futuristic musings. Much of this technology is here today. So much so, that the Washington Post recently printed an article about the 15 default settings you need to turn off. And just last week, they published 15 more default settings you might want to turn off. From this point forward, unless you’re careful about what you buy, and mindful of the installation process of the things you couldn’t avoid buying, the motto in your house will be that of Dr. Frasier Crane – “I’m Listening.” Watch the video at the end of this post for what you might be saying to your appliances before too long.


The gallery has a few photos from my early morning walks with Maddie over the very hot weekend that we just had.

97 thoughts on “Not Your Father’s Old Man Post

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  1. While technology has simplified our living experiences I still believe life was better before. I’m certainly not a pessimist but the old world lifestyle had a charm factor that we don’t see now. People are walking on the roads with the heads down busy with their smartphone. They don’t even know who passed by them. Earlier, the interaction was limited but real. Today, it is all about Likes and Views. We don’t visit people often because we already know what they are doing thanks to the social media for the minute by minute update. I also agree that there are many benefits of technology like better communication, better transport options and so on. However, I would still vote for the old world lifestyle. I know it sounds so weird as these words come from someone who made a career out of the internet and technology.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It’s not weird. You appreciated what you had, you understood. I think we will figure this out, but it may get worse before it gets better. Without technology, I wouldn’t know you. I think we need to remember to stay in control.

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      1. Talking of technology. I would like to ask you this. What was the situation in good old days when you had to make a state to state call. I mean long distance calls. And what if you don’t have a phone at home. In India, we had these yellow STD (subscriber trunk dialling) booth. The moment you connect the call the meter would just sprint like an Olympics athlete. So, most of the conversations would sound like rap songs. Was the situation similar there?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Well, when I was very young, we had to have an operator make long distance calls for us. The rates were very high. When I was in college, we could dial long-distance calls ourselves, but the rates were still high. Rates were cheapest on Sunday night. One week, I would call home on Sunday night. The next Sunday, my parents would call me. That lasted well into the 1990s

          Liked by 1 person

          1. That was quite an experience, wasn’t it? I mean the effort we make to stay connected with our loved ones. It truly brought us closer to each other. Now, with Skype and WhatsApp and FaceTime the effort has been replaced with convenience but the charm is missing. The current generation doesn’t even get to enjoy the fun of writing a letter.

            Liked by 1 person

  2. What a wonderful way to start a Monday morning. Your posting, Dan, was fun to read and got me thinking about all the technological changes I have lived through (and hopefully will continue to live through for a good long while).

    Liked by 2 people

      1. I’m with you on that, Dan, but sometimes you can only resist change so long before it draws you in. I remember thinking it was ok to have to get up to turn a knob to change channels on the television and thinking I did not need electric windows in my car most of the time. I think we all have our own little battles we fight against technology–I use a 1950’s vintage Gillette double-edge razor daily and a wind-up wrist watch. :)

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Those are good rage-against-the-machine items, Mike. I still have a wind-up watch but I don’t wear it. I don’t miss cranking the windows but I do miss vent windows.

          I guess we all cave to this stuff, but I’m holding out against the fridge having a credit card.

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  3. The USB routine cracked me up. So true! I love the bunya photos. So sweet. Right now I am peeved with my furry friends. They are digging up my potted plants.. 😕Ummm….we still “make” ice in those funny little trays. We don’t trust the cleanliness of this fridge that we didn’t buy and that the freezer is a bit iffy already. So, weird little trays it is. We just make four trays at a time and keep the bucket full as much as possible so we pretend it is ‘automatic’. 🤣

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    1. I can understand. We filter the water into the ice maker but my wife still tosses them regularly if they’ve been there a while. We don’t use much ice.

      Sorry about your plants. We have much more fence this year around the garden to keep the bunnies out.

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  4. I like these kinds of posts. They remind me of the small things I’ve taken for granted – like the specialized stores. I’m a shopper – I love to shop, but it’s been only the past year or so that I’ve really embraced the small boutique stores. It’s my feeble attempt to snub my nose at the homogenization of the big box stores where everything seems to be the same regardless of where you are.

    … and Alexa? She’s not welcome here.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne – I’m with you. We shop at a small(er) grocery store, a local chain of five stores, and I’m trying to keep the local hardware store in business.

      Alexa is not welcome in our house. Holding out against that as long as we can.

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  5. And, this is why people move to the country and live off the grid. Life could be simple if only we wanted it to be. I could be one of those folks if I just wasn’t quite as ‘mature’ as I am. The comments are great, and my one addition is the weather app. When they created them, I wonder if they ever considered that future generations wouldn’t make a move without consulting them and using them to decide if they could possibly venture outdoors. I still look out the window, decide what I’m going to do, and adjust as the weather changes. I know – I’m a rebel. :-) Happy Monday, Dan. Loved the post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Judy – I totally agree about the weather app. My wife keeps hoping, maybe in the next budget they will buy the weather service windows for their office. She thinks the birds are better predictors of the weather. Along with the weather app is reviews. I read some reviews of a tool that I own, and I wonder if the reviewers are using the same tool or even know what the tool is supposed to do. Yet people are driven buy those reviews as if they are gospel. I figure the really good ones were paid for and the really bad ones are self-inflicted wounds.

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  6. Enjoyed the photos as well as the musings, Dan. Being married to an IT guy, I’m well aware of the issues of the “smart” devices being able to see or hear you. Then there’s the hack-ability factor. We don’t plan to have smart devices for our garage door, house, etc. any time soon. We also have the camera on our laptops covered at all times (unless I’m using Skype.)

    Another problem is knowing how to manage all those smart devices. I didn’t realize when we got married what a blessing it would be to have married an IT, tech-savvy man!! Just yesterday I was trying to figure out why all of a sudden Google was saying I was out of storage and would soon be unable to send or receive emails. Naturally, I found this out right before I had to go to work and although I thought I’d resolved it, it was still an issue when I got home from work at 9 pm and wanted to just relax. Long story not quite so long–it’s now resolved, but there are still things I need to know. I had to chat with a person at Google, too, and although he was very helpful, it’s discouraging to have it be such a difficult process.

    I’m not even going to talk about people being on their phones all the time as I have to much to do today.

    Happy Monday!!

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Janet – I’m actually a little happy that there is a benefit to being a nerd, finally. It’s like I’ve been waiting for this all my life. Still, I’m slow to embrace the connected life. I’ve done pretty well making my own decisions. I also don’t want everything controlled by voice. I can hear my wife asking me what I was saying and me saying “I was just talking to the trash can.” When will we have quiet?

      Things being hacked is what scares me, because companies still tend to think of security last. And, if you read those Washington Post articles, almost everything comes out of the box tracking you and sharing everything it tracks.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. When I was buying my car a couple years ago, the salesman had to tell me what to do with the fob–no key. It still amazes me. Guy I work with has his heating and a/c hooked to his phone. When his kids call him to complain how hot it is inside their house, he turns on the a/c from work. I want to NEVER do that! That is just too darn weird.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve only had rentals, so far with the fob. That’s going to take some getting used to. Also, the way it unlocks as you get close. At least I’m still behind the wheel. I do not deal with the heat or AC in our house. If it’s cold but my wife is comfy, I put a hoddie on. Alexa would last about thirty seconds if she said: “Dan is home, resetting the AC to…”

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Jennie. It is scary to think about. Some people predict that the current generation might either be the last one to get a driver’s license or the first one where most people don’t get one.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Vent windows! We all miss them — all who got to experience them, anyway! (Why do *they* keep fixing what ain’t broke??) Husband’s bank recently sent him an Echo and an Echo Dot. Uh, apparently free and unasked. We’re trying to figure out where to send the box back to.

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      1. Yes! And maybe especially in old pickup trucks, which were hotter than blue blazes! You know, you’ve given me an idea about the Echo twins.. I’ll suggest husband walk them into the bank; it can be their baby to deal with!

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  9. About the cables . . . I met a guy back in 2014 who asked me if I knew anything about wireless electric power transfer. He was talking about large scale transfer. I told him I would look into it but I didn’t. The cables might someday become extinct too just as you say. I wonder what would happen to all the copper.
    Also, with all those crisscrossing cables on the two electric poles, wasn’t there fire when the pole was hit? The transformer breakers should have tripped.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are starting to see wireless charging options for small devices, Peter. I don’t know about doing it for larger items. Perhaps the devices will be battery powered and the batteries will be charged wirelessly. I don’t know, but Nicolai Tesla thought it was possible.

      The power pole was only cracked, it didn’t fall. It would have been a large outage, as the three lines at the top are a feeder circuit from the main substation out to the airport.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. This is my kind of write-up, Dan! I still have a fridge that does nothing but keep things cold. I just get water out of my kitchen sink and ice out of a tray in the freezer, thanks!

    All of these changes that you mention, I feel like so few of them (if ANY of them) are for the better. It’s nearly impossible to fix your own car now, what with the computer controlling everything. I also feel like this is something that’s quite dangerous. While driving one day years ago, suddenly there were no brakes. Drove straight to the dealership. They took the car out, drove around, came back… said the the brakes were fine and there was nothing wrong. Got in the car, it was like nothing had ever gone wrong. Thankfully it never happened again, but that’s just one of the reasons I don’t think computers should be controlling the 2-ton hunks of unforgiving steal that we ride around in!

    People like to poke fun at how “old-fashioned” I am, but I’ll tell you the truth — I just wear it like a badge of honour. Old-fashioned to me is a compliment!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I knew what side you would be on, Wendy and I am proud to know you. You will survive when the power goes out. I stopped working on my car gradually, as the computer took over more and more. Engine, brakes, suspension – all now under control of the box. My wife could live without all of this, and will likely live without most of it until it becomes inescapable.

      That’s scary about the brakes. The self-driving car that hit and killed the woman in Arizona, could have stopped, but they had turned that feature off during testing. I’m guessing that means they could turn it off while you’re driving. You know, as part of an update.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ugh, that’s terrifying! Also reminds me of how some cars with certain computer capabilities are completely susceptible to being TURNED OFF by someone driving by if they have the right equipment to do it. Can you imagine flying down the interstate and suddenly your car just shuts off? Steering wheel locks up — in four lanes of traffic. Just the thought makes me shudder. Seems so unnecessary to have all this junk in your car.

        I drive a Focus now, but had a PT Cruiser for many years. If you wanted access to the battery, you had to take half the stuff out of the engine compartment! I don’t like all this forcing the consumer to go to the garage — not when the garage is charging $95 an hour, and 99% of the time cause more problems than what they were supposed to fix in the first place!

        Goodness, I feel old sometimes.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Ha ha – well, my ride will certainly read this and say “I love Wendy!” Don’t confuse old with sensible. We’re being used to pay for the development of self-driving cars. We don’t need this technology but they need to develop it.

          Like

    1. I’m keeping my paper books, Lynn, just for that scenario.. I don’t like eReaders. I’ve read some books on the Kindle App, ones that weren’t available in paper, but it’s a last resort for me.

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  11. I’m somewhere in the middle, Dan. I’m a pretty conservative guy, so the “old ways” tend to appeal to me, but I don’t mind embracing updates — as long as they make sense. Not all of them do! But I’ve seen enough guys in my working career who decided “I will go this far and no further” when it comes to technology (one refused to jump from Windows 3.1 to Windows 95; another refused to do computers at all, sticking instead to his electric typewriter and leaving his secretary to print his emails). So I made up my mind early on that I wouldn’t be THAT GUY. I’d roll with the updates.

    One I could really go for would be, yes, no cables. Speaking of which, it’s remarkable how quickly we can adapt to new things. I got some wireless earbuds a few months ago, and it didn’t take long before I was in full-blown “how did I ever live without these things?” mode. It only took one time forgetting them before I was lamenting my now-backup WIRED earbuds. Such a hardship! ;P

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    1. Having worked in technology since ever, Paul, I have adapted to most things. We’ve had a network at home since before it was easy and we’ve been using computers since the mid-80s. My daughter remembers DOS and OS/2 and logging onto CompuServe. I do have wireless headphones and I do like them.

      I’m going to have a hard time with some things. I use a lot of pneumatic tools in my shop, and they are gradually being replaced in the marketplace by cordless electric models. I find having a compressor and running multiple tools off it to be some much simpler and less wasteful than having 15-30 batteries that have to be disposed of and tools that have to be replaced when batteries dies and can’t be replaced. I have air tools that I bought 30 years ago and they still run fine.

      I’m not resisting everything, but I’m not automating just for the sake of automation, and I’m not looking forward to talking my way through my house as I get ready for bed.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Dan – it used to be ‘when we’ moved from Zimbabwe to South Africa … so here’s another ‘when I was…’ and yes I’m getting left behind with gadgetry – but we still will need to walk the dog and enjoy the great outdoors (I hope!) … and have get togethers and chatter to each other, or converse deeply or ‘undeeply’ … so much change is going on … my goddaughter doesn’t have a tv … we are in interesting times and it’s where I realise I miss out not having kids – to keep me up to date … ah well – life is life – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. They recently begun running ads for a dog-walking service that you can schedule from your phone, Hilary. You can track the walker as they walk your dog and they can even mark the spot where your dog poops – you cant make this stuff up.

      I’ll still be walking Maddie on the weekends and I’m looking forward to retirement when we can walk whenever we like.

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      1. That’s the way it should be … but people are making opportunities for themselves to earn that little extra … it is interesting to see what’s going on .. cheers Hilary

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Beautiful, amazing pictures! And wonderful post! Of course, any post that includes a clip from Frasier is automatically wonderful. :D As for the Internet of Things, if all the Things are as stupid as Siri, I shudder to think.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oooh, I could just copy and paste that back in and have my one-liner Wednesday – I wonder what would happen if I asked Siri to open the vent window? Maybe she’d change my car back into my Dodge pickup.

      I’m glad you liked this and the clip :-)

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Super fun post Dan. Perfect Frasier clip! I’ve had similar conversations with my now 22 year old granddaughter. For me, the technology we have today is overwhelming, and most of it goes right over my head!! I have this iPad that belonged to my S-in-L. He wanted a new one with all the bells and whistles. I’ve learned the basics, but that’s all. No banking on line. No shopping on line. I don’t make or cancel appointments on line. I don’t do social media.

    I just have fun! I love that I can text/email people. That I can take pictures and save pictures sent to me. That I found bloggers and can follow them, and in a small way, be part of the blogging community. So for this technology I am so grateful.

    But I don’t want a toilet seat talking to me or a vacuum scolding me that I vacuum too often!! I come from the era of rotary phones and party lines!! I would welcome them both back in a NY minute!!

    I know there will always be change and progress. I just hope we don’t out-change and out-progress ourselves!

    Photo gallery is fantastic. The first bunny is a Hallmark card. And you wanted a closeup of that little yellow flower, Maddie just wanted a closer look! Love the water drops on the leaf and the one of the two sprinklers. Hope you can catch that rainbow. I would love to see it.

    But the best one is the two poles. Talk about cables!!!
    🔹 Ginger 🔹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. Don’t forget the toilet that tells your doctor what you ate.

      Some technology is useful. Some is fun, but some is unnecessary. It pays the bills, as I’ve worked with it for 40 years, but we shouldn’t do everything we can do.

      I’m glad you like the power poles. I figured you would side with Maddie on the flower-bombing.

      Like

  15. I don’t think I’d like my washing machine talking to my refrigerator. It would probably say something like “she’s put on so much weight – don’t let her open the freezer doors. No more ice cream for her.”

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  16. Your post just made me feel really old. When I was a kid, cable was what connected one rotary phone to the next; when I was a kid, TV dinners were made in the oven, not a microwave; when I was a kid, my mom took us shopping at the dime store, where you could buy things for a dime (take THAT dollar store!); when I was old enough, I learned how to parallel park without a backup camera.

    Yup, I’m old.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “I learned how to parallel park without a backup camera.” You’re not old, you are amazing!

      The stuff we knew would seem like fiction today. Our daughter was born in the 80s and there are lots of things that are ancient history from that “era” (she’ll hit me if she sees that I used that word).

      For the record, I used to love figuring out how to spend that dime :)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The 80’s was the era of the HUGE cell phone. I laugh when I see photos of them now.
        Alternatively, the 80’s was also the era of the best rock ‘n’ roll hair bands ever…White Snake, Bon Jovi, Ratt, etc. Faith should be proud to associate herself with that part of the decade, right?

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  17. If you recall (you may not) I found you via my I LIKE KNOBS post. Forced to buy a new washing machine and all that.
    I don’t like all this digital appliance crap, I miss my cd player, I want my thermostat to do what I say, not what it thinks I want based on my previous behavior and I miss my car keys! I am about five times more paranoid about locking myself out of my car and office now, and I had OCD about it before!
    I like my rear camera in parking lots. It does NOT help me in the driveway. I have to look. I just have to. I don’t trust it. lol
    A visiting child at my house had never seen ice trays and thought they were “cute”! I kinda wanna have her back over this summer to make her freezer pops. How cute and quaint, I’m sure.
    Anyway, I love this post!
    Annnnd, I love Frasier.
    I proclaim, you are one of my people.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed this post (I figured you would). There are far fewer knobs to day than there were even a few years ago. I think I’ll be able to adapt to a backup camera, but I don’t like the keyless fob thing. I’ve had them in rentals and I don’t like.

      The stuff that “learns” from our behavior assumes that the patterns in our behavior are reliable. Some of the things we do are reliable, but it’s at a different level. I’m not sure a thermostat or a washer or a microwave is ever going to figure us out.

      Make that kid those freezer pops – I love those!

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  18. This is so great. I was just talking about this very thing with our postie yesterday. He’d noticed we had a new car and wanted to know why it wasn’t a Ford (it’s a Lexus) because we’ve always had Fords. I won’t bore you with the answer except that it’s to do with the decimation of the Australian car industry. We got talking about the tech in cars now. I’m still struggling with not having an ignition key and I wish the bloody car would stop talking to me. I already know where all the school zones are, thank you very much. The postie was saying he’s very non-tech and can’t keep up and I made the observation that it’s changing so rapidly that there will be things coming out that even my late teenage years slash young adult kids will not be familiar with. It’s a full on world we’re living in.
    PS I laughed like anything at your description of putting in a USB connection. Ain’t that the truth?
    PPS It occurs to me that my local postie is probably also going to be something my kids will talk about in the past tense one day. :( “We used to have these real people who delivered what they called letters to your house.”

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    1. I’m glad you liked this. I think we’re all struggling with how fast stuff is changing. Young people will be ok (for a while) because they are used to a faster pace of change than we are, but the pace will probably continue to increase to the point that it will frustrate them too.

      The tech in cars is something that bothers me a bit because, so much of it is unnecessary. The automakers want to put it in, as they move us closer to self-driving cars, but I can read the sign that says “School Zone” as well as my GPS.

      I hope your postie hangs around. I worked my way through college as a postie (that’s not what we call them, but I like the sound of that).

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  19. I’m not someone who thinks that the past was better. And yet when I read your post, I know that we were fine without so much technology. For the first time ever I drive a car without putting the key in the ignition and equiped with a camera too. I have to do without the ignition, but I still don’t use the camera and still turn my head back and forth :)
    I laughed when I read Joey’s comment above. I’m just like her!

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    1. I think you make a good summary. It isn’t that the past was better (vent windows were) but that we don’t need everything they are adding. That’s closer to how I feel, and I’m one of the guys adding technology to business for a living.

      I think these designers should have to meet with Joey 😏

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  20. Great images, and thoughts!

    A lot has changed since I was a kid, and I’m not ready to jump on the high tech end of smart everything. I want a fairly dumb car, I still would want the rear-view camera, and heated seats, dumb appliances, and non spying internet services.

    Everyday it seems like there’s another default I need to turn off so companies aren’t spying/snooping on my internet/computer time. Sigh.

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    1. Even my somewhat-anti-technology wife wants heated seats. I want the camera, she doesn’t. I would prefer a key, mainly so I know I have my other keys. I’m going to lick myself out of the house when I make that shift.

      The default sharing services make me angry. They should have to make it clearer and easier to disable those services.

      Thanks for your comments tonight.

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  21. In the old days, a refrigerator would last 20+ years, now they’re engineered to last just as long as the warranty, this I learned the hard way. Plus, it’s usually cheaper to buy a new one than fix it.

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  22. Dan, we in this house avoid smart anything (except for my cellphone). We don’t want things connected either or having our every move seen. I must admit it has gotten awful convenient for me not to go shopping, something I really did not enjoy to begin with. It’s exciting to get those boxes in the mail. I like “manual” as in doing things with my hands and not voice activated. Our creativity is being snuffed out by technology if you ask me. I’m still a hands-on person and I know you are too. As for default sharing ….. no way! Sorry. Just no way! Again I like to be in control in my own home. I’m not all that nuts about all technology. Some yes. I also believe in hanging on to appliances for as long as we can because nothing, and I mean nothing is made to last more the 5 years anymore. Sadly we have become a throw-away society.

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  23. You’re way a head of me. I didn’t even know you could connect your washer and dryer to your phone. Really?! My head is spinning. I’d rather look at your pretty pictures. But this was a funny post. :)

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    1. I’m glad you got a chuckle. some of this stuff really makes me appreciate having a sense of humor – otherwise, it might be depressing. The feature that makes me wonder is the refrigerators that have cameras inside so you can look inside from your phone.

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  24. All so true….have to laugh at the USB adapter…glad to know I’m not the only one that has that happen. Talking to our youngest daughter, we were thinking it really wasn’t that long ago smart phones really became smart. She can remember having to get a data plan for her “smart phone” when she started college and that was only 10 year sago and look where our phones are now and we feel like it’s always been that way…I can’t take all of the electronics on appliances for the sheer fact that the mother boards are not that dependable and it’s not cheap to replace them…can’t we keep some things simple?? Great post…love the pics!! Have a great weekend!

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    1. Thanks Kirt – this comment ended up in my spam folder – I agree that some things could be left simpler. It is hard to remember when we didn’t have smart phones. I remember having to get a text plan when our daughter went to college. Remember texting on a numeric keypad?

      Liked by 1 person

  25. I appreciated all the old timer references that are ONLY for those special people who are young at heart! I am so glad you included power cables and would add phones as another subject matter. Those party lines, where you picked up the phone to call a neighbor and got another neighbor already using the phone. Then, of course, I love but hate cellphones! They are a whole post of complaints and compliments, mixed together.
    This collection of photographs was absolutely perfect in its counterbalance to the ups and downs of changes since we were kids, mainly I could have been an older sister, you may not have used a party line phone in elementary school. My brothers didn’t very often, they would get on their bikes to talk to their friends. Ha ha! :D

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We had a party line until I was about 10. We have seen a lot of change, from two houses sharing one phone to everyone in the house having their own phone. The pace of change is fast and getting faster. We just need to hang on 🙂

      Like

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