The Rest of Collinsville – #ThursdayDoors

St. Patrick Church.

If you’re a regular reader, you might be expecting to see some doors from Pittsburgh. They will come soon enough, but I thought I’d finish the doors I collected while Faith was driving me from Goshen, Connecticut to Farmington, stopping for every door in between. I should mention that for all of the doors in Collinsville, we were walking. Faith likes to walk. She comes by that trait naturally, as both her mother and I like to walk, but it’s fair to say that Faith is better at it. I had mentioned wanting to get a photo of a few doors that we passed as we drove to Goshen, but I thought we would drive back to them on our way home. Faith decided they were within walking distance.

Did I mention how hot it was that day? It was hot.

Still, we walked. First, we walked into the antiques store in the old Collins Company Axe Factory building. What looked like a quaint New England shop, turned out to be a vast two-story multi-vendor antique warehouse. Yikes, the money we could have spent. Fortunately, clearer minds prevailed, and we suppressed most of our impulses. After leaving the shop, we turned to head around the mill. I was OK with that. The mill was originally powered by the dammed water of the Farmington River. You can still see the various sluices through which the water was channeled and in which the water turned giant wheels that drove the machinery. Who doesn’t love seeing that?

Across the holding pond is a small building that houses a turbine generator. This was built be Collins Company employees to create electricity to power the plant once it converted from water power. The door for that building was hard to find (I had to walk into the woods to get a photo) but peering into a window yielded a much better picture. The inside of the door was visible, as was a crane. Faith discovered that and took a picture to include the lines formed by the window grate. I took one to get a close up of the crane.

After more pictures, we headed back – or so I thought. Faith turned the wrong way.

Where are we going?

You said you wanted pictures of that church.”

We could drive there.”

It’s not that far.”

It wasn’t that far, but it was adding to the distance between us and Faith’s car. Still, we walked. Once I took a few pictures, we headed back to the car. As we arrived at the street where she had parked – at a point where I could see her air-conditioned car – she turned again.

Where are we going?

You also said you wanted pictures of that church.”

We could drive there.”

It’s not that far.”

Actually, it was quite a bit farther than the previous church had been from our previous turning point. We could only see the top of the steeple from where we were, but any argument was mute – we were walking.

Speaking of driving, filling in for Norm today is Joey. Joey drives a lot. Mainly, Joey drives people to things. At least that’s what I can glean from the crazy-funny stories she shares on her blog. Her blog, by the way, is where you will find the little blue frog today. Norm is on vacation, so it’s Joey and the blue frog who can direct you to all the doors and to the sign-in sheet where you can register the location of your doors (if you have some to add).

As we say goodbye to Collinsville, I want to thank Faith for driving, the Editor for editing, Joey for hosting and you for stopping by and looking.


70 thoughts on “The Rest of Collinsville – #ThursdayDoors

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    1. Thanks Judy. The Axe Factory represents New England well. The Farmington River was home to so many mills, large and small, as were most rivers in New England. These guys built the factory, built the power plant and became known around the world for “edge tools” – it’s really an incredible story.

      Faith gets her steps in, for sure. Keeping up with her is good exercise.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Lovely pictures of the St. Patrick Church and I also loved the Historical Society building. Walking is good for health but walking in the sun is a different game altogether. I overdo it at times and the next day I fall sick. You know Indian climate.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Exactly, John! Water power put New England, and this company in particular, on the world map. The plaque on the side of the powerhouse says that the Axe Factory employees built the powerhouse themselves. They bought a used generator, built the dam and the control gates and harnessed to river for electricity after direct water power had become a thing of the past. They did this at five different locations!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. LOL, Dan… wasn’t there an Uber anywhere? My back is such a pain lately that I wouldn’t have made it. So don’t feel bad. :D I love looking of pictures related to mills. This is a lovely set of them with in your Thursday collection. And that statue above the church door… I can’t stop thinking that it might have a mischievous side and start dropping rotten fruit on people as they go in the door. Hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. No Uber, Teagan. Faith was my ride, but that car was parked for the duration. It’s OK, she’s also big on hydration, so staying healthy. I think the tomatoes are reserved for the folks sneaking out after communion ;-)

      I love old mill and manufacturing buildings. It’s so good to see them. I hope this one can be preserved without being altered too badly.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. There were so many photos in today’s post that caught my attention, but it was the first one that I kept going back to. LOVE that wrap-around waterfall – I can’t tell whether it really is huge as it looks.
    … and the water above the fall is so still with the sky reflection in it. Love, love, love. I would have taken a million photos of this one scene and still have difficulty leaving it. I can almost hear the sound of the rushing water ….

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Joanne. That waterfall is huge. I don’t know the whoe story, but I’m guessing they might have extended it around the corner to build the power plant. The mill pond is very large, and the river is very wide at that point.

      Next summer, we hope to go back for a different visit. You can rent kayaks at a place just above the waterfall and paddle upstream for a good distance. I’d like to do that.

      Like

  4. St. Patrick’s Church is picture postcard beautiful. The Axe Factory is so New England and even today represents so proudly a time gone by. I just love the waterfall.

    Hope you didn’t pick up any ticks crawling through the woods! 😄
    🔹 Ginger 🔹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. I didn’t go very far into the woods. I had walked all around, muttering “this place has to have a door!”

      The church was worth walking down to see. I wouldn’t have gotten the long shot of the whole building if we had driven into the parking lot.

      That waterfall is beautiful. It’s hard to get pictures of it, because of the bridge, but the layout of the falls, the river, the mill pond and powerhouse is just amazing. Harnessing the water power in this region took some masterful engineering.

      Like

  5. Greetings for another week, Dan. I seem to be on my own this week, but my favourite was the photo of that menacing big hook dangling down.I belong to another blog share, Friday Fictioneers where we write 100 words to a photo prompt which often ends up in murder. They’d love that shot; Here’s a link:https://rochellewisoff.com/
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

      1. They would love it. I keep taking photos to send through to them but I still haven’t got around to it. I was at a garage sale today and they had an 1960sish laminex table with aluminium trim with chairs and they let me photograph it. It looked very familiar and such a relic from memory lane. I’m intending to send that through to them. UNfortunately, no doors.
        Best wishes,
        Rowena

        Liked by 1 person

  6. You took your photos to a whole new level today, Dan. They are gorgeous! I love the water shots, the spider web, the church, that road that slants down…. What a beautiful place this is. Glad Faith had you walking…!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Lois. I should mention that the spider web is Faith’s photo. I do like it a lot. I know this is a doors post, but the water is such an amazing element in this area. It’s literally why all this stuff is here. I do enjoy walking, I just wish it had been 20 degrees cooler.

      Like

  7. You can still see the various sluices through which the water was channeled and in which the water turned giant wheels that drove the machinery. Who doesn’t love seeing that?

    Who doesn’t love seeing that?

    My wife, that’s who.

    When she sees me eyeing something like that, she knows she won’t see me for at least three hours.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She can wait with my wife at the Crown & Hammer.

      I wish I could go back in time and see it in operation. It simply amazes me how people figured out how to take in water from a relatively uncontrolled river and harness the power to make the finest axes in the world.

      Like

  8. Great post Dan. Neat doors, neat stone and brick work on the buildings. And a dedicated guide helping you work up a thirst for the following weekend. I guess ‘proper hydration’ would be a fitting description for this post.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Thanks for the shout-out, I do drive the people to the things. That’s me, all right! Hosting is my pleasure :)
    So many beauties in this post! I also love the spiderweb, the incredible stone trim detail on the brick building, the classic white church, the angles and swoops on St. Patrick’s, and OH EM GEE on the Axe Factory! Is there no end to its glory?!?
    That Faith sure is a good walker. I’m a good walker, but I feel like she’d wear me out. Looks hilly, and yeah, HOT. Oof!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks! The factory is just amazing. If they make it into residences, I’d like one. It would be cool to live near a waterfall and a pub.

      Not too hilly, but hot. Hot hot hot. Faith can do some walking. She could outwalk us all.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Me too. Waterfall and pub, mmhm.
        Hilly, I realized just now, is relative. You’re from a hilly place. I am too, but yours is hillier. You know what’s really important? Neither of us live in flat**** Georgia :P

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Most of my coworkers are at our annual policyholder meeting in Sea Island, GA. I let another member of our front go. They’re complaining about the heat and humidity. So glad I’m not there.

          The first time I took Faith to Pittsburgh, she said “I understand why you gong think Connecticut is hilly”

          Liked by 1 person

  10. my goodness, it looks like your whole trip is on here, and not only the church door, lol. Love the two parallel roof lines by the way!
    Another thing that is not lol, is that I just discovered your comment and that of Joanne Cisco in the spam folder. When I clicked “not spam” the comments disappeared all together! Jean’s comment did not arrive at all. Do you know someone at wordpress who knows about these things?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve had numerous problems with comments (mine and people making them on my page) and the “Happiness Engineers” at WordPress seem mystified.

      This was the last stop on our short trip, but it was the mother-load of doors. Thanks!

      Like

      1. A late reply on your problems with comments – since this is the first time I see it now today -discovered that I can see more of the comments made to me by first going to my profile – phew, misery loves company, but I’m glad it’s not my zero-savvyness!

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Way to go, Faith. Push on. Wonderful pics. I am reminded of starting my life in WV, where most everything is brick, then moving to PA where most everything is stone, and settling in New England where most everything is wood. I will always find that interesting, and appreciate how settlers used what was there. Great post, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Jennie. The thing I remember most from West Virginia and western PA is how people were undaunted by hills. Roads, farms, houses, it didn’t matter, They built them on those hillsides as if it was no big deal.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes they did, Dan. Before I-64 was built, the main highway cutting across WV was RT 60. Talk about houses on hillsides! Some parts were a bit creepy, too. But, family, resilience, and pride was foremost even when they didn’t have much.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Whenever I see the words “St. Patrick’s Cathatherol” or “St. Patrick’s Church, my mind immediately goes to the St. Patrick’s in New York City despite never being inside. I wonder how many “St. Patrick’s” there are.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hi Dan – oh good I’m glad there was a pub there!! Sounds like your daughter is determined to keep you fit and up the mark as far as walking is concerned. Looks like a very good walk around … and a really interesting area – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

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