A Few More Pittsburgh #ThursdayDoors

Magnificent!

Between our fiscal year-end (Nov 30) approaching at work, and Mother Nature pressuring me on my outdoor projects, there has been zero time to get out and snag pictures of doors. Fortunately, I took a gazillion pictures when we were in Pittsburgh, and I still have some special ones to share.

Some of the pictures in today’s gallery were taken on the North Side, in and around the Mexican War District, some are from a few random locations, including our ride home to Connecticut.

If things go well, weather-wise, I will soon have opportunities to add new doors to the collection and maybe some time to do a bit of research. In the meantime, I’m drawing down the reserves but enjoying the memories of where, when and with whom I was when I captured the images in today’s gallery.

Our host today, and every Thursday is none other than Norm Frampton. You can visit his page by following this link. Norm always has the best doors. His little helper, the nameless blue frog, sits near the bottom of the page and can sneak you into the large gallery of doors from around the world. As the frog may have been known to say: May your door frames be plumb and level, your hinges sturdy, and your latches secure.


69 thoughts on “A Few More Pittsburgh #ThursdayDoors

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  1. That church is a beauty! Like you said, it has everything going on
    I also really like the red brick house. We too have many in that style with the side extension and an upper floor that’s all windows. It’s ALMOST as good as a turret 🙂

    Good luck with the weather and getting all the outside work finished.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne. The church was amazing. Every turn I made revealed another entrance. The brick house is across the street from the church and is being renovated. I don’t want to think about the cost of that job, or the cost to heat that building, but it is a wonderful house.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Cheryl. I look at those entrances and I start imagining the work involved and how long it must have taken. Can you imaging going to work, day in, day out on the stone archways around that main entrance, while others were working on the windows, and somewhere in a shop, a group of woodworkers were making those doors…

      Like

    1. I do like the farms. There’s something about the setting, in between the green hills, that just feels like Pennsylvania to me. When I see farms in the midwest, with a few buildings and thousands of acres of corn or soybeans, it just doesn’t have the same feel.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Oh yes, this is one amazing church. You could post any, even if little door from it twice and I wouldn’t complain. I love your photos, also the first black’n’white one and that salt storage. It could fool me into thinking it was a bunker. Please find some cranes in my post from today for your birthday and I hope it’s a happy one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Manja – I always look for the cranes :-) My birthday was a good day, and later, a good meal. I wasn’t sure what the dome was until we got close enough to peek inside.

      I hope you’re having a good week.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Judy. Both games we saw were with KC. We lost on the football field but the Pirates won in the 9th inning, just before it started to rain.

      As I mentioned on you post, those farms in central PA are so pretty.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I like that salt storage building. Industrial style door and a build once neglect always patina on the building surface. The farms are a welcome touch. Is it possible to be slammed for one’s choice in doors ? And who cares as long as it requires proper post slamming philosophical discussion in a sophisticated watering hole ? Which brings me to the question – have you posted the doors of Cheryl’s bar ? And before you leap to an answer virtual gives one a lot of latitude.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Hence the name CPUR. Corona Preferred Uncertainty Reducer. Then again we can move right along to the Tunxis uncertainly principle which clearly states – If you are watching your drink you can’t really enjoy it. And if you are enjoying your drink you can’t really watch it. And no matter what – I did give you all the latitude you might require. Even if that would involve latitude with attitude. For that just add Corona…

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Dan, even ‘magnificent’ doesn’t describe that church! One can only imagine what the interior is like. Love the house across from the church and those farms. The salt dome is great. When I see one, I always wonder if an Eskimo will come out or a Creature from Outer Space. Lol.

    Those are definitely ginormous hinges, but what’s with the pink? Colorblind perhaps?!

    Great collection today.

    Mother Nature is due to slam us any time now. 😡😡😡 Hope you can salvage the weekend and at least finish what remains to be done on the garage. I’m sure your squirrelly friends are anxiously waiting to inhabit this beautiful building where the nice man leaves them peanuts!!
    🔹 Ginger 🔹

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Ginger. I see the pink door as more red, so it bothers me less, but it was hard to work with. I wanted to include those hinges.

      We are supposed to get 5-8” of snow tonight. It will be a mess, but it’s supposed to warm up and rain tomorrow and be in mid 40s on Saturday. If we get sun on Saturday, I’ll finish that long side. The squirrels will have to settle for the outside of the garage – I’m not planning to turn it over to them.

      Like

  5. Yeah, I know the feeling of having too many things going on at the same time. Am glad to be home and without unexpected things popping up all the time, to be able to be more organized!
    Wow a beautiful front of the featured church, as well as it’s door.
    Also like the little pinkish door – too cute!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So far, you might be the only one liking the pink door (which I see as a nice red). The big stone church has so many nice features, I didn’t know where to stop.

      Things will stay crazy for a little while, but eventually they will settle down.

      Like

  6. Hi Dan – some extraordinary portals here … loved the Cathedral … as well as the others – bombshelter or similar … could be an ice holder … ie salt and dirt or an early ice-store room … the red brick home looks interesting. Good luck with finishing things off before the snow and ice arrive – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Hilary. Snow and ice are arriving as we speak. I don’t think it’s going to stick around very long, but it’s here tonight and will likely be here tomorrow morning. I don;t need much of a window of sunshine to finish the long wall. Saturday might still work.

      The dome is where they store road salt and. Sand for when it snows. The church is just stunning. I also like the farms.

      Like

    1. Hi Peter. In the winter, in the north, towns spread a mixture of salt and sand on the roads when we get snow or icy conditions. It’s a lot cheaper if they can buy it well ahead of time and store it until it’s needed. I figured you would like the power plant.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. LOVE the stonework in this set of pictures, Dan. Oh man I just love love stone and brick. That church is out of this world. I could spend days, literally, pouring over every inch of that place! Loved this gallery …. thank you! 👏🏼👏🏼👏🏼

    Liked by 1 person

  8. That church is amazing. The way the arches are stepped, the stone, the vines, the windows, the reflections. That’s a beauty!
    I think my favorite is the recessed metal ‘garage door’ in the pointed brick doorway.
    But they are ALL good finds!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I loved the images of the church. Generally, whenever you put a church image I can almost think of another church in India that has similar architecture. My town/region of Vasai has around 52 churches mainly of Portuguese influence, but Mumbai also has plenty of churches. Even if I exclude the smaller churches I’m quite confident the number will cross 150.

    Liked by 1 person

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