This Week of Doors – #ThursdayDoors

I love Mission style doors.

Between illness and weather, 2019 still hasn’t brought forth a doorscursion opportunity, or so I thought. Then I realized that there are everyday doors that I pass every day, along with some somewhat-special doors I don’t normally have the chance to photograph. For instance, there were some beautiful doors on a building on the Big-E fairgrounds. Faith and I attended a woodworking show there on Sunday. As we were driving out, I spied the two sets of identical doors that I hadn’t ever seen closed. Normally, these two buildings are hopping with activity. So, I stopped and snapped. As we left the fairgrounds, we saw what appeared to be an abandoned cement plant. Normally, police officers keep the exit lines moving along smartly. On Sunday, we stopped to investigate.

On Monday, I noticed doors while sitting at traffic lights on my way home. Doors while sitting behind school buses unloading children. Doors while waiting to turn from one road to another. Every building has a door, and I spend a lot of time sitting across the street from them. I also encountered a few doors I don’t normally see, so I thought I’d toss them in, too.


This post, and the doors in the gallery are part of a weekly festival of doors called Thursday Doors. All this fun is brought to you courtesy of Norm Frampton. If have the opportunity to go on a doorscursion, of if you’re just passing through a neighborhood and have your camera or phone handy, snap a few pics of some interesting doors. Then, if you want to join us and have some fun, drive over to Norm’s neighborhood and drop your doors in the capable hands of the little blue frog. Just go to Norm’s place, it will all make sense.

74 thoughts on “This Week of Doors – #ThursdayDoors

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  1. Lovely images. I love the upper and lower barn door picture. I and Sarah always have this plan of ditching our apartment sometime in the future and look for a rural property where we could retire. We both are nature lovers so we prefer tranquillity over anything else. Okay, that brings me to a question maybe you could answer. I have always seen this beautiful homes in the USA that are way deep in the forest, or somewhere up in the mountain. I just saw this Netflix series – The Most Extraordinary Homes in the World and they showed few homes in Arizona desert and California mountains. My question is – how do property owners get water connection and electricity in such unconventional places. Do you have any idea about it?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Sharukh. As for the remote locations, usually water will be supplied from a well on the property. I’ve seen shows about projects where they have drilled over 2,000′ (610 m) to reach the water table. Sewage would be handled through an engineered septic system. Power can almost always be brought in. It would be expensive, but the power companies will string a line for almost any location, and that’s a one-time cost. A lot of homes in the west also rely heavily on wind and solar for electricity, some staying off-grid entirely. They might have a diesel or propane generator for backup or emergencies.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for enlightening me on this, Dan. I was hoping they show some New England homes in the show, but all they showed was California, Arizona and Florida. Some homes were overly fancy, some were functional and simple.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. New England is fairly dense with respect to housing, until you get up into Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine. Also, heating is a much bigger issue for New England (especially those states) than it is in California. It’s one thing getting power to a mountain home, but when you’re 10 miles from the nearest town and you get 2 feet of snow, that’s a different problem.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the barn doors and the other great architecture you captured. And, yes, there have been too many times to count when I wanted to holler ‘Yo! Buddy, move the truck.’ A home across the road from us had one of those original solid wood doors with the black hinges. It was a handsome red and fit perfectly with the Cape Cod architecture. When new owners moved in, they took it off, and there was a regular door behind it. Not quite the same character. :-)

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Ha! You said Bart’s; I read Brat’s. But for that little curve in the ‘R.’ Those older homes are gorgeous. Everything about them–what’s not to love. When I first moved to FL, after a year of throwing money at a rental apartment, I bought a little Craftsman-style bungalow in an old part of town. I loved it but it had zero insulation so my gas bill in winter and window unit A/C bills in the summer were astronomical. Sold that house in a heartbeat, but I cried when I did.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Lois – Bart’s / Brat’s, they both work for me. I do look at some of these older New England homes and wonder how they manage to heat them (or how much it must cost). Still, the attraction is strong.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I drive through some beautiful older neighborhoods going to and from work, and I always think I should take some photos. But, of course, I’m usually late, driving in heavy traffic, don’t have my camera with me, it’s too cold, rainy or snowy, etc. etc. etc. A couple of years ago I did take a day off and drive around taking pictures of some rather unique towers/steeples, with the intention of doing an entire series on that subject. Alas, since then I’ve only managed a couple more photos, which didn’t turn out well enough to publish. At some point, I need to go back and retake them.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. The upper/lower barn doors and the “barn-like” door on the house are super. But these buildings are incredible. The craftsmanship, the designs, how beautifully they have been kept up. The door to the dentists office put a smile on my face too…..but that’s where it would end!!

    Be safe through these two storms heading our way. I think you’re gonna be real glad you have the snowblower primed and ready to go!! Hmmmmm, will we see a Mt. Maddie?
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed these doors, Ginger. I like the buildings and I only later realized that you can’t see the doors that well, but the craftsmanship is so good,

      I think we might see a start to Mt. Maddie. I’m guessing the crazy redhead will be let loose to play in the snow. She just loves it.

      Like

  6. Nice tour of everyday doors that you pass along your way. Everyday doors in New England are much more interesting than the everyday doors I pass along my way here in San Jose. :) I particularly love the crusty old concrete factory and barn doors.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Upper/lower barn doors, wraparound porches, and a vault alarm door: wow what an awesome assortment Dan. Let’s hope you get/stay completely healthy and we can all pray for milder weather so we can get out there soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Cool collection, Dan. I hope you’re back to full steam soon.
    Wow… I really love the “not a double exposure” house. How gorgeous.
    Darn that truck — it’s blocking some extra cool looking doors. I can’t figure out what a vault alarm is, but it’s a cute door!
    Feel fabulous fast. Hugs.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Teagan. I am feeling pretty good. January is a tough month, the Monday of the year. The house with the two doorways was one I wanted to use for Atonement, but the day I drove there, the sun was making it almost impossible to get a good photo.

      I really wanted to go ask someone to move that truck.

      I hope you have a great Friday!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m finishing off my day with you, Dan. Call it saving the best for last. I enjoyed the different photos. Your dentist ought to get a door of distinction. His looks like it was sold to him by a door to door aluminum salesperson. Of course, it does make you smile.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I love those big front porches, we don’t see much of them here. You would think they’d be more popular in Ireland as we get a lot of rain. Are they more for shade in hot sunny weather, Dan? Hope you’re feeling better today.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Jean. I think the porches were designed to be more of a protected space for being outdoors. Some also provide some cooling or shade, but some of these are facing due east, so they would only protect from the morning sun.

      Like

  11. Those houses are the epitome of charm! My aunt and also a friend of mine here in Corydon had houses with double entrances: A big one into the formal front parlor and a smaller one set back to the side that led into the family sitting room.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Great collection. Honest to goodness, the best doors around me are ones I cannot get, because no sidewalk and crazy traffic. On the one hand, those seem like good properties, nice real estate, pricey — on the other, what a pain it must be to get in and out of those drives. I suppose they take the good with the bad — and they should probably invite me over for dooring.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I think the location in that road hurts the price a bit. One side has nice deep lots, with the houses set way back. The other side is right up at the road. I’ve seen people trying to get out. It’s not easy. You need a spot to turn around do you can pull in and pull back out.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Yeah! This is a nice Smile door indeed. Next time you go, congratulate your dentist on it and tell him blogging community approves. I also looove both houses where you mention details: photos #4 and #7. And this: “Every building has a door,” is another contender for our slogan. ;) Great!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ha ha – Thanks Manja. I guess the dentist is just trying to lighten the mood. It does seem to work. I’m glad you like the details. We don’t have houses from the 14th century, so I have to take what I can find.

      Liked by 1 person

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