May Potluck – #ThursdayDoors

Ok, what book does this make you think of?

May has been a crazy month, and although I have a lot of door pictures, I still have to fill-in some of the information about them. Therefore, today, as the title suggests is a day for leftovers. Since I’m still using the Classic editor, I can provide the information that I have about these doors in the captions.

Thursday Doors is a crazy-fun blogfest that let’s us share and view doors from all over the world. That’s not hyperbole, that’s truth! Each week, Norm Frampton shares his doors with us and invited us to do the same with him. He collects the links to our doors and makes them available so we can visit doors from everywhere. If you have a door(s) to share, or if you want to see a great collection of doors, head on up to Norm’s place. Um, it’s OK if you look at my doors first, Norm would understand. Thanks for visiting!

78 thoughts on “May Potluck – #ThursdayDoors

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  1. You always have an eclectic mix of doors for ‘leftovers’ and this week they are a colourful bunch!

    Danny’s Grocery gets 2 thumbs up from me, but the 2nd photo caught my attention. This is just a plain box of a building but then they decided to do something different and put those oval windows on the top along one side and add in a little embellishment. THAT I wasn’t expecting!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne. I noticed that same thing about that building. It’s interesting that they only decorated the main street facing side of the building I drive by Danny’s often, but it usually has a crowd outside.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Dan – didn’t know you’d gone into the grocery business … but I’m glad the 451 answer came up – I’ve just made a note to get the book out and read it. Great selection of doors … I’m glad that porch on 525 is held up that well … but I particularly liked the leaning tower of pisa – threw me off my stride briefly – and I’ve walked the proper one. Cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Hilary. I think that book is worth rereading today. 525 (Main St.) looks like it’s about to get some attention, maybe a nice renovation. They’ve been turning a lot of buildings in that area into apartments. I loke to see the older buildings survive.

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    1. Thanks Gwen, but Norm gets the credit (blame) for that change. I have pictures from years ago when I would visit cities, and there are almost no doors! What was I thinking? I pay much more attention to my surroundings now.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Ok Dan, these sneaky “selfies” are becoming a habit with you! There you are, just as nice as you please, reflected in the door of the Corner Pug!! I love it! 🤗 Next time maybe you could wear a Hawaiian shirt to jazz it up a bit!

    I like the church and its entryway. I really like the corner door….the way they set it off with white sides. That poor old mill, except for the windows, looks like something King Arthur would come out of. The shed is a winner.

    Like Gwen, I find myself actually studying all the intricacies of buildings now, not just looking at them and seeing nothing. See? You CAN teach an old dog new tricks! 🤗
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha! I didn’t realize I was in that door. I’ll have to pay closer attention. Maybe I should wear an LED bike light, so I’ll see it clearly.

      It’s hard to imagine a nine-story stone and brick building. I need a new shed, but I don’t have room for that length.

      Norm has us all studying buildings now. He’s created monsters :-)

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  4. At Restaurant 451 all the patrons memorize a menu item. And everyone keeps a close eye on the chef… now on the cranes aren’t the doors in the floors ? ! ? On second thought I am fairly sure I don’t want to get up high enough to find out.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Nice mix of colorful and shapely doors Dan! I like the corner store, the golden light on the city skyline. The Marriot sign really stands out doesn’t it, and that church door. That’s a beauty!

    Yep, that’s the book I thought of.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Deborah. I like John’s comment (above) about the Restaurant 451 – I’m surprised the city lets them have that sign. I remember when the building changed hands, I thought the sign was temporary. That was about 20 years ago.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Oh gee. I didn’t realize you could only caption photos in Classic editor. I’m sticking with Classic. My photo choice is the old flour mill. The doors and the poor building say much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Annie. You can caption photos in Guttenberg, but you have to fill the ‘Description’ field, and neither field shows in the Galleries when you hover over the images. The old flour mill is an amazing structure.

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  7. It’s classic editor all the way for me. Many times new is NOT better, thank you. Enjoyed your gallery and yes did see that reflection selfie of you, Dan. (smile) I don’t know what it is about you “boys” and your “toys” and “sheds”. Anyways, another great door post. Thanks, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I like the overhang on the police door. You are a curious guy, Dan, sneaking up top for your photos.😄

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  9. The flour mills in MN are another one of those chilling snapshots reminding us of yesteryears

    And I also like that black PUB door with the purple paint on the building –
    How was the lunch there?

    Liked by 1 person

  10. If May was busy, I hope June is as busy as you like it.
    The church is the building that draws me back – interesting architecture for being 200 years old, to my novice eyes, that is – I wonder if it was considered advant garde back when it was erected?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Maggie. I had the same thought. Unfortunately, I think it has served a variety of religions, and I ran into a dead end when searching for information on it. I hope to did up some information on it, and maybe go back for a visit.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I first discovered that with a local church that dates itself back to the congregation which formed in England and came here to avoid persecution (and then went on to hang Connecticut’s first “witch” but…

          Liked by 1 person

  11. Hi Dan,
    I love the concept of pot luck doors, more in the sense of taking pot luck and picking a door, any door, and seeing where it leads you. I wonder how such random door selection would impact on our path through life and whether it would be any worse only different?
    I’ve been thinking about destiny and journey a bit lately as I research my convict ancestor who was my first ancestor to set foot on Australian soil. We have a bit of a myth going on that convicts were sent out to Australia for petty crimes and it’s encapsulated by the phrase “sent out for stealing a loaf of bread”. My convict’s family were actually landed gentry and while the details of his crime are still hazy, he was sentenced to transportation for life and everyone else that day only got 7 years and it seems to be more along the lines of white collar crime.
    Obviously, his actions (along with getting caught) changed his destiny dramatically and saw him going through the door of a ship in chains.
    Anyway, my kids have just arrived home and my son’s hand is “broken” so I’d better get off and play Nurse Nancy.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have some sketchy stories in our family’s past. I figure all is forgiven by now. The doors we choose to open and the ones we bolt shut do form our future. I hope your son’s hand heals nicely.

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    1. Thanks Jennie. I was hoping to get a picture of the doors at the other side of the opening. There were 4 or 5 in various stages of overlap. Just as we were getting ready to leave, they seated a party of six at the table in front of those doors :(

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Super collection! Danny’s is colorful enough to carry off a boring door. And I do love those hardware stores! Anyone less handy around the house than I has yet to be born, but I love browsing hardware stores. That active church with “abandoned” windows is kind of odd. Maybe they found out the price of stained glass, and chose to use the money for community service. That’s the story I’ve assigned them, anyway. :)

    Like

  13. Keep thinking how one would call the architectural style of that red church – if you daughter happens to be around, can you ask her? (only when she is around!). Somehow I misunderstood you a few weeks ago – I thought you already had made the change to the new editor with the blocks:)
    Am glad you finally got “your” store included. Maybe that Danny is like you:) Our neighbors is one like that – he knows everyone, and visa versa:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have tried the block editor, but I reverted back to the classic editor so I can include the captions with the gallery photos. Hopefully they will get that squared away soon.

      Like

  14. Clever potluck theme – excellent choices for the doors too. And, truth be told, I was hoping someone else would’ve commented on what book the 451Restaurant reminded you of…so I wouldn’t have to ask…but now I have to because I can’t figure it out! ;-(! I’m sure it’ll be a duh hit my hand to head kind of deal….! LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Another smorgasbord of doors, Dan — very impressive! I always enjoy the sight of a red-brick church, but you have many other good specimens here as well.

    Like

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