Walking to The Old Manse – #ThursdayDoors

I love the front yard, filled with spring!

I knew this was going to be a busy week, with meetings at work and outside of work chewing up a few of my normally quiet evenings. So, I’ve been saving these houses (and their doors) for today. When I last visited Concord, Massachusetts, I decided to walk from Monument Square in the center of town, out to The Old Manse. That’s also when I discovered the Robbins house.

On the way, I walked by some beautiful old houses. I don’t know how old and I don’t know who built them, so they are perfect for a week when I don’t have time to do any research.


This post, like those of a few dozen other bloggers, photographers and amateur historians, is an entry for Norm Frampton’s weekly celebration of all things on a hinge. If you have a door(s) photo that you want to share, or if you just want to see what has been shared by others today, head on up to Norm’s place. He has some beautiful doors waiting for you, and links to hundreds of other doors.

62 thoughts on “Walking to The Old Manse – #ThursdayDoors

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  1. Amazing assortment, Dan. I’m intrigued by the dark house with the yellow door. I suspect the owners wanted to communicate “welcome” and so it draws me in. Have a great day!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just love these big old homes. It is really a challenge to say which one I like the most. I would be delighted to take ownership of any of them … but the blue one with the white verandah! That one calls to me 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Cheryl. This has been a long week. I’ll be happy to see Friday. The barn house is interesting. I have no idea what they do with the barn, but I know what I’d do with it. That last one is a favorite as well, that’s why I put it there in the gallery.

      Like

    1. I wish you luck. It would take quite a few pennies to live on that street. I do give the people credit for keeping these homes maintained, and keeping the historic appearance of the neighborhood.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hard to pick a favorite out of these handsome homes. The barn-house and the last one catch my eye. I would think I died and went to Heaven if I could afford to maintain any of these stately homes! Clearly the owners can afford to maintain their homes and do so to the nines.

    Nice tour through this elegant neighborhood. Nope! Don’t like the brown house with the yellow door! 😳

    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Ginger. I figured someone would want to paint that yellow door a different color. The two you mention are my favorite ones.

      The houses are beautiful, but maintenance has to be expensive. I’ll stay put where I am.

      Like

  4. Beautiful homes – but you have to ponder, who in the world thought, “how am I going to make this thing bigger?” At some point, like approaching the property line, it is a good time to stop adding on additions. :)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It looks like you had a beautiful sunny day for that walk, Dan. All the photos were filled with light and color. What a collection of really big homes — that must have been a long walk! I’m glad you included the white picket fence and gate entry. (Gate door is still a door!) That one is particularly charming. Hugs on the wing.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m not much of a gambler, but I’d play a round of jacks against you for the white house with the red barn. Wowza! What beauties these are! Holy crap Huge Substantial Home! What a show off! I say all that in admiration, even of the brown one with the yellow door. I’m not too good for a brown house :) But then, like, would the kids ever move out? Perhaps a lil yellow bungalow is just right after all!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. What a great neighborhood! I love the first house full of Spring, and the big Yellow house. The one shaped like a barn is pretty neat too, and the brown one with the yellow door reminded me of a log cabin. A fancy one but a log cabin. I like it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Deborah. I loe that house with all the spring flowers. I don’t want to think about the work to kee the houses maintained (or the gardens) but it was really nice walking by. Some of these places just go on and on. I like the one with the yellow door because it looks like a normal sized house.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Hi Dan – gosh I’d love to visit Concord again … I knew nothing about history, but now many decades later and through blogging – we learn so much. ‘History’ has been brought to life in recent times … the internet I’m certain helps us – and we can see things that we’d never normally get to know about. Fascinating stories and delightful photos – gorgeous – cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, what a totally delightful neighborhood. So many lovely big old homes. I could easily imagine myself ringing any of these doorbells to kick the owners out so that I could move in.
    I said “imagine myself”…not that I’d actually do it :-D

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha – perhaps we should remind you that we’re not in the bail business either, Norm.

      I can imagine living in some of these houses, Norm. They are beautiful; On the other hand, I’m not sure I’d want the maintenance burden. I am glad they keep them in such good condition, though.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Those are some honkin’ big houses. Also honkin’ pricey. But gorgeous! I love the last one, and the swoopy, gingerbready ones on the dormers of the Fifield/Fay house. And I’ll bet the dark house with the yellow door looks great in person! Some things just don’t photograph as well as they look.

    Liked by 1 person

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