Bushnell Park Playground – #WATWB

Sometimes, things that appear to be going badly, end up going very well. Friday was one of those times. I had a post planned for WATWB. It had been planned for over two weeks, but I ran out of time during the week. I thought about writing the post early Friday morning, but I was getting my hair cut and then I had to go to work. I Put a message on the WATWB Facebook page saying that I would be late, probably posting on Sunday.

If you haven’t posted as part of this monthly blogfest, you should know that the organizers and cohosts are some of the nicest people you’ll ever work with.

Friday morning, I drove into Hartford for my haircut, and I spied something new near the Bushnell Park Carousel – a playground. As I entered the playground to snap a few pictures, I realized how special this new “accessible” playground is. According to John W. Hollerbach, who designed the playground:

“A lot of times when people think about accessible playgrounds, they think somebody’s bound in a wheelchair. That’s the biggest misconception. There are kids with hearing impairments, visual impairments, as well as kids on the autism spectrum and with Down syndrome.”

The playground looks like a fun place, and it’s positioned in a wonderful setting.

“The larger playscape has a tall twisting slide. The structures borrow features from the Hartford skyline. The larger playscape features a gold dome, resembling the state capitol and the accessibility ramp is patterned after the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch.

A large web-like climbing structure called “The Pegasus” is made of rope and shaped into a pyramid. Sensory panels allow children to turn the panels and play games. A child can jump from round pods to a balance beam and back again, or hang on the rings.

The playground has a rubberized surface and color-varying steps. Two rocking horses, off to the side, offer a quieter place to play.”

The article from the Hartford Courant, that the above text is quoted from, mentions nine other accessible playgrounds in the Hartford area.

Playgrounds should be accessible by all children. I think this is a very nice project gifted to the City of Hartford by the Bushnell Park Foundation.


The “We are the World” Blogfest is now in its third year. This blogfest’s goal is to spread the message of light, hope and love in today’s world. We are challenging all participants to share the positive side of humanity. This month’s co-hosts: Sylvia McGrath, Susan Scott, Shilpa Garg, Eric Lahti, and Belinda Witzenhausen welcome participants and encourage all to join in during future months. #WATWB is a blog hop on the last Friday of every month.

55 thoughts on “Bushnell Park Playground – #WATWB

Add yours

  1. It looks like a great an innovative idea, Dan. We had a play ground like this donated to our local park. Unfortunately, it has not been maintained and I would say it is probably quite dangerous now as a lot of items are broken. I hope your one is properly maintained by the installers.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Boy! Someone really had their thinking cap on when they designed this park….a place where there’s something for everyone. I hope this trend catches on all over. How nice there’s a place where kids can join in the fun instead of just watching it.
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Hi Dan – what a great idea … and wonderful they’ve specifically thought about kids with varying degrees of difficulties – I do hope it’s kept up, and looks like it should be as the others in the area have been maintained. Great – because kids need space to play, cogitate and just enjoy the wonderful outdoors … lovely choice for June ‘s #WATWB … cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Joanne. IWhen I saw this, I thought it was just a normal playground, but when I read about the design, I was impressed. My best friend and I are trying to find a day when we can tour the Memorial Arch – stay-tuned.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wow was I impressed with this park, Dan! Someone really understands the needs of those kids who have learning disabilities. How awesome and what a fun place! I would even play there! Now I’m not technically anything challenged but ….. I LOVE to learn! Thank you for this post!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Seeing a historic carousel immediately made me think of the carousel in Rod Serling’s hometown of Binghamton, New York — the one that inspired the Twilight Zone episode “Walking Distance”. Nice post, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Genius thinking behind this design and such an inspiration. We could use one like it in our town. Looks like there would have been no witnesses that day if you did try out a few of the play structures.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply to Kirt D Tisdale Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: