So Much Good News – #WATWB

A couple weeks ago, the National Hockey League (NHL) here in the United States suspended its season. The next day, the players on the team that I follow, The Pittsburgh Penguins, agreed collectively to provide the people who work at PPG Paints Arena, the salaries they would have earned in the five remaining home games. I thought this was a story worthy of WATWB. I made a note of it.

During the days that followed, I saw many stories about people, businesses and government agencies going out of their way, before any official response was announced, to provide necessary care for people in need. People who, through no fault of their own, were going to suffer. I made more notes. American Express was giving cardmembers interest free periods for balances they are forced to carry. Groups stepped forward in and around Hartford to provide free lunches to school students who normally get a lunch provided for them at school – schools had been closed.

Within a few days, I had links to more stories than I could include. That’s a good thing.

So, I chose one story to share. If you’re familiar with my blog, it won’t surprise you that it involves beer. Well, not beer, but a brewery – The largest brewery in the US – Anhueser-Busch. Check this out:

“Anhueser-Busch InBev today (3/24) announced it will redirect $5 million that it normally spends on sports and entertainment marketing to the American Red Cross to support the fight against the coronavirus pandemic. The donation comes as the sports world remains shut down…”

“Additionally, the brewer will donate media air time to the Red Cross for public service announcements…”

“Today’s announcement follows a move earlier this week by the brewer to begin producing and distributing hand sanitizer that will be distributed at Red Cross blood donation centers and emergency shelters…”

This is one example of how people are stepping up to help others in need. And since the number of people in need is growing, this is a good thing.


The “We are the World” Blogfest is now in its third year. This blogfest’s goal is to spread the message of light, hope and love in today’s world. We are challenging all participants to share the positive side of humanity. This month’s co-hosts, Sylvia McGrath, Damyanti Biswas, Shilpa Garg, Belinda Witzenhausen and myself welcome participants and encourage all to join in during future months. #WATWB is a blog hop on the last Friday of every month.

If you want to SIGN UP for WE ARE THE WORLD – Click HERE to be part of the Light.

 

60 comments

  1. We need inspiring stories that will to inspire others. We are not alone in this. A brewery in Toronto is doing the same thing. Clothing manufacturers are making masks and a car maker is making ventilators. We can come together and make it through these frightening times. Our spirit is indomitable.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a good gesture, GP. I have issues with most large charities, but I’ll give these guys a passing grade. The ones that really bother me are the mostly self-serving groups who live it up with our donations. I could start naming them, but that would defeat the purpose of this blogfest, which is to spread good news ;-)

      Liked by 2 people

        1. Don’t be. You raise a good point, and you did so in a polite/professional manner. I’m good with that. I appreciate your time – there are lots of other things to read and comment on, but you came here. You are always welcome and your thoughts are always appreciated.

          Liked by 1 person

    2. GP – I have some of my own issues with Red Cross. However in the area of blood collections services and comparison to total volunteer organizations I find the conclusion misplaced. I have been a blood donor for many years. The collection of blood products goes on 7 days a week. They do field collections of whole blood on weekends and specialized blood product collections at Red Cross sites 7 days a week. I would not want to ask professional nurses to be volunteering their time on such a basis. And that would be for the same reason the Army is not asking retired veteran medical personnel who currently are working in hospitals to come back for the covid-19 emergency. There are reasons some ‘volunteer’ positions are paid. Think of volunteer fire fighters and EMS. They are on call 24 x 7. Plus a fair bit of required training to keep up their certifications. I don’t doubt you have some good reasons concerning more volunteer than paid positions on RC staff. However I don’t doubt that both of us might be enlightened finding out what it takes to have a well organized community/national organization on constant standby for emergency response. And if I might change the subject slightly… I was very impressed by the response, organization, and focus of the Commander of the Army Core of Engineers to the repurposing of facilites to emergency medical beds for the virus outbreak. Might this be a subject for one of your posts ?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I have other issues with the Red Cross, but I understand the point you’re making. I donate blood myself either to my local hospital or blood bank, and I wouldn’t mind giving it to the Red Cross,, if they were around here. My money on the other hand goes elsewhere.

        Liked by 2 people

  2. Especially now in this time of crisis it is heartwarming to read this good news. Kudos to the Pittsburgh Penguins, American Express and Anhueser-Busch, and the folks in Hartford who are providing lunches for those kids in need, for stepping up to the plate and using their resources to help.

    I’m hearing about many acts of generosity on the part of businesses as well as individuals. I hope these generous deeds don’t fade away with the virus.

    Thanks for sharing this Dan. It’s very inspiring.
    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I, too, hope that we remain aware of the ways in which we are all alike and vulnerable, and how we can help and be helped by each other. I’m not certain that will happen. Lord knows there are more than enough “I’ve got mine” stories out there as well.

      I think good examples help us realize that there are good and helpful things we can do. AB-InBev didn’t do this for the publicity (although I’m sure they appreciate it) they did it because it’s the right thing to do.

      Like

  3. It’s nice to know the private sector of business is willing to step up to the plate. It puts some faith back into this country for me. Our government may be shoddy as h@## right now, but the individual citizens are still rallying.

    Thanks so much for sharing, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Dan – that’s great … I do hope many more executives follow the lead of these organisations … we all need to do what we can – even if just like me – staying locked down … thanks for sharing these folks’ actions – good luck to you and yours – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It really is, Deborah. At a time when a lot of companies are trying to retain their profit profile, it’s good to see some that are giving back to the community and helping their employees who are in need. I won’t forget the companies in both camps.

      Like

  5. Great post Dan – it shows that when the worst happens that communities, businesses and individuals step up to the plate and do what they can for what is needed. There is SO Much good around! Thanks for co-hosting. Stay safe be well and wash your hands :)

    Liked by 1 person

  6. It’s so amazing the way that we can come together as a community and as a country in time of crisis. My hat is off to Anheuser Busch for their willingness to part with profit in order to help the Red Cross and those sick with the virus. I hope all major companies are doing likewise.

    Thanks for hosting this month, Dan, and hope you are having an awesome Friday.

    Liked by 1 person

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