This is Why – #1LinerWeds

Today’s One-Liner was “suggested” by the Editor. When I was enlisting her help in using my shop-built crane to raise the section of roof structure onto the side of our shed, I wanted to convince her that it was safe. I started explaining how I had considered the various forces at work and how I had used material or purchased components that were much stronger than required. Lacking the ability to really engineer a crane, I opted for overkill.

For example: The main pulley will never be required to support a load of more than 200 lb (90.7 kg). When I purchased the pulley, I found one that was rated at 480 lbs. (217.7 kg) for $9.95. That’s actually a slightly higher capacity than the hoist’s lifting capacity. Still, next to that pulley, for $14.95 was a larger pulley which is rated at 10,000 lbs. (4535.9 kg). I opted for the higher rated pulley.

I was explaining that the only item in the current setup that wasn’t dramatically stronger than necessary is the boom line or boom pendants (the web straps holding the boom up). These are stronger than necessary, but under certain conditions (if the boom is lowered), the safety factor decreases. Of course, 1) I don’t intend to lower the boom to an unsafe angle and, 2) I have higher-rated web straps, if I need them.

I then started to explain the math involved in making these decisions, how the force on those straps varies with the sine of the angle the boom makes with the scaffold. I reminded her of when kids used to ask math teachers “when will I ever need to use this in real life?” I added that this is an example of when you need to use that knowledge. To which the Editor asked:

“Is that going to be your one-liner for Wednesday? That you need to pay attention in math class so you know what you’re doing when you build your own crane?”

Well, yeah. I’m going with that. Note: You can skip this first gallery. It’s just offered as evidence as to the complexity of this small project. Cranes, even little backyard cranes, can be dangerous.


This post is part of Linda G. Hill’s fun weekly series One-Liner Wednesday. If you have a one-liner, I would encourage you to join in on the fun. You can follow this link to participate and to see the one-liners from the other participants.

74 comments

  1. When I was around 11 or 12, I asked my dad how a car works. He took me outside, lifted the hood on the family vehicle, and began explaining. All I heard was pistons, but I listened (with thoughts somewhere in outer space). I still don’t know how a car works, but I’ve learned never to ask that question. I feel the same about cranes. I’m in awe of your skill, but as for me, I’ll continue to stumble around in the kitchen. :D BTW, beautiful photos–especially lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer. :)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. And, as you stumble around the kitchen, you’re walking by a lot of things I don’t understand. We all have our interests. I get a lot of flak out here when I bring math into a post. I get it at home too. I didn’t think I’d cause any ah-ha moments here. Thanks for visiting, Gwen.

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  2. Seeing the cows in masks, I thought, well at least you’ll recognize them whenever the day comes to take them off. That was because of what a lady said to me last week as we talked waiting on a pharmacy line. As I went to leave, she said it was nice talking to me, though the next time we meet – I’ll never recognize you. I thought, How true!
    In school, I could do math, but brother did I hate it! I think I glazed-over when I read about your crane. That DID remind me of school!! 😏

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sorry to remind you of school. For me, it would be English class that would cause me to glaze over.

      That’s an interesting comment. I wonder how many people we’ll have to “meet” again for the first time.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. hahaha Ok Dan, for the next time some asks if it is safe, the correct answer is : “Yes.” Repeat it with me: “Yes.” You are smarter than the average bear and we applaud that. My relationship with numbers is restricted to telling time and how many minutes on my microwave. I am dummer than the average bear when it comes to math. Actually I got lost in math when it morphed into letters that didn’t make words. What I will say is that I love where your math takes you. The results are picture worthy.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Haha – you make a keen observation and a good point, Pam. But, I rarely resort to one-word answers. I mean, this whole post is supposed to be One Line. For me, that those letters didn’t have punctuation was a good thing. English was my nemesis.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love your crane and the imagination behind it, but I had just finished my coffee and clearly wasn’t up to the math lesson, but then I’m an arithmetic person. :-) Your Rose of Sharon must have put on quite the show this year, and I am constantly amazed that Maddie lets your small four-legged friends get that close. Love the cows! We have a family down the road with a large stone sheepdog near their driveway. He wears various hats depending upon the sports season or the weather, and this year he’s also been wearing a mask. Makes us smile when we drive by. :-)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I write these at night, and I tend to forget some people read them with breakfast. Sorry.

      I remember going to NYC to see the Cow Parade. One of our daughter’s art teacher had painted two cows. We traipsed all over Manhattan looking for them.

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  5. Love those bunny ears and can’t believe how feisty Smokey is getting. Puddle photo is great, as is the water spray. Beautiful Rose of Sharon. Cows made me smile!
    Ginger

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    1. There are at least three black squirrels. One is a bit too daring for his own good. I try to make him move, but it I make noise or too much motion, Maddie will lunge after him. She’s more confused than accommodating.

      I’m glad you liked those pictures, Ginger. I hope you’re having a good week.

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  6. The math makes my brain go dark, but the crane is impressive! I sent the link to The Handsome Surveyor…he gets math, he’s going to be moving their Hot Tub if the sale of their home and the purchase of a new one for them goes through without a hitch. I sure hope the boys pay attention to their maths lessons when they get this far along into them so they can make one if they need one.

    Maddie is quite impressive too just sitting there at full attention but sitting there with a squirrel practically in her face!

    I love the double Rose of Sharon and the hazy summer morning images. I’ve noticed the days are getting shorter too. I’m not ready for that!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The crane was built for helping me to move lumber and equipment around in my shop. I was lucky I could use it for this job.

      I think Maddie is confused by the squirrels. If I try to make them move, or if they get spooked, she will lunge after them. Maybe she’s waiting for me to short them, or maybe she thinks they’re really dumb birds.

      I only notices the shorter days because we’ve had to walk early to beat the heat. I’m ready for the heat to be gone, but not the rest of it.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Pam’s response made me laugh–I remember when we were told about ‘new math’ that had letters and numbers. I barely understood old math. English and Spelling….now we’re talking. I used to be the Queen of the Spelling Bees. Sadly, that has faded…. The photo of Maddie and Smokey is so cute and backlit bunny ears, too. Darn Walker Lady–shouldn’t she be inside, out of the heat?! Curious: except for the first two photos in your gallery the others all had double captions under them. Not worth getting the HE out on that, but I wondered if you noticed that, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was the opposite, Lois, always out in the first round of the spelling bee. The double captions are because of the new editor. It only displays “Descriptions” while the Classic displays “Captions” When you hover over them in the mosaic – I copy the text into both fields because I don’t know where I’m using the pictures. I’m going to try and figure this mess out. I guess the Walker Lady was trying to beat the heat, too. I give her credit, and I kept Maddie at a distance.

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  8. Seriously impressed that you designed and made your own crane, and have even provided your working here as proof – maths and a bit of physics too! Top marks for you Dan :-) PS I’m happy to see walker lady is still ok – sorry Maddie :-)

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I can imagine the look on the editor’s face – I may have had the same expression when hubby suggested he could raise the statue in our back yard downed by the hurricane. He got tired of waiting for his friends to come by and help him. So, he rigged a tripod and used a block and tackle to raise the statue and reseat it on its pedestal. Summer is waning here, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good man! I’ll give him a few of the bonus points I’ve collected over time ;-)

      One of the things I plan to use this for is accessing and storing ladders. They are high on the wall of our garage. I move them with the aid of ropes at each end, but it’s time consuming and dangerous if anything slips. The height of this was designed to easily reach lift the topmost ladder.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Keep backing up that intense Math knowledge. I’m always in awe of engineers and mathematicians but have a secret fear and loathing for Math, mostly based on performance issues. I appreciate that all that exists is traced back to numbers in some way. I consider it one of life’s great mysteries. I just don’t like being tested on it. Nice work as usual.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Wow–today was almost like a greatest hits of the photos, because we got a sunrise, bunny ears, Smokey, reflections, and a project-related image. About all we were missing were elongated shadows and MuMu. As for your crane, all I wonder is whether it is strong enough to pull out an engine–I could see you restoring a car with the skills that you have, Dan. :)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Mike. I had a 30-year love affair with a Triumph Spitfire. This might have been able to lift that engine, but nothing bigger. My car restoration days are well behind me. As you get older, you have to focus on fewer hobbies.

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  12. So there will not be a ‘snap’ quiz regarding the crane ? And did you wear a construction helmet when working around and under the crane ? And while I am wandering into 20 interrogatives do you have a crane business card ? Dan’s Crane Inc. Weight we can take that load off your shoulders…

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I would never have thought of building a crane, but seeing the prices for the pulleys, I would probably go with the higher priced one as you did hoping the added strength would cover my inability to keep the multiple calculations right.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Hi Dan – were the cows there to be used as counter-balances?! I know there are people who would love to chat to you … but not me – I’ll spend time with the Editor in the kitchen happily creating some interesting dishes and a chilled glass of wine so we can gossip along, while you’re sweating away outside. Great photos – thanks for these … all the best – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Kudos to the Editor for her comment/questions. :-) I love the reflection shot, maybe because finding a puddle to take a reflection shot is going to be a challenge here. I looked up average rainfall in our city recently and it was 9″…a year! That does equal a lot of standing water. :-) Anyway, cows with masks beats people tearing down statues, so thank for the smile. If you follow the news right now, smiles are in short supply!

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think this is only the third time I’ve seen that puddle this summer. I know it’s the only time I saw it spill out into the second area. We are 10″ behind in our rainfall at this point in the year, and our snowfall was minimal last winter. I hope we return to a normal pattern before long.

      The cows were fun to see. I don’t watch a lot of news, but I read several sources. Smiles are definitely in short supply.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. I’m glad my engineer husband paid attention in math class as his knowledge has come in handy many times. On the other hand, I bring other talents to the relationship that he is weaker in, so I guess it’s a good trade-off. One of my talents is to appear interested when he goes to great lengths to over-explain things when a yes or no would have sufficed.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Despite being good in math (at least that’s what Mom used to tell me, and even if I knew she was totally wrong I dared not contradict her), I have no idea what I’m looking at with the drawings. Probably because it’s that f-word (physics)…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I pay attention to those events. I think, in most cases, the collapses have followed mistakes being made in the use of the crane, or using the crane in unsafe conditions. Being under 10′ tall, I’m not worried about wind. The apparatus will normally be used inside my garage.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. The Editor hit the nail on the head. Pay attention in math class, because you need to know what you’re doing when you build something. Please don’t ask me to describe your diagrams… Super photos, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Yep, that’s quite a one-liner. I on the other hand never plan to build a backyard crane so I suspect my torturous math classes were a waste of time. I had to take basic eight grade math two times in college! I always read that everyone’s equally good at math but some convince themselves otherwise. Not me, just not a math brain.

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  20. Much love for the painted cows and for the puddle. I still haven’t managed to get a decent puddle shot.
    The diagrams remind me of physics. You must understand, I didn’t take physics. I was pressed to get all my math requirements for university in, but I’m a born teacher so I have helped many people study for physics and I am still not ready to look at fulcrums or pulleys. Further, paying attention in math class was of little help to me, and it’s one-on-one tutoring that got me through algebra. Geometry was easy. Why was geometry easy?

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    1. I’m glad you like the cows. They always make me smile. Geometry involves a lot of logic and you seem to be a logical person. I wasn’t trying to explain the physics. I just wanted people to know I had considered safety.

      Liked by 1 person

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