Labor Day 2020

Today is Labor Day, a national holiday in the United States. It’s supposed to be a day when we celebrate the contributions workers have made to the strength and prosperity of our country. The gallery below is a collection of images from the exhibit at the Connecticut Historical Society Museum I visited in August. Most of the images have a (sometimes lengthy) caption that explains it. That’s my post, just the gallery. And, since the Editor cannot view the captions without encountering the Block Editor, I’m giving her the holiday off. Any typos you find are my fault.

If you are in the US (or anywhere that celebrates this day) I hope you enjoy the holiday. And, if you’re in Connecticut, please consider visiting, joining or supporting the Connecticut Historical Society.

45 comments

  1. Wonderful history lesson Dan. This country always comes through for the war effort. Working side by side for one common goal. Hats off to all those in the work force today, and a huge thank you to those in times gone by,

    How sad though, that we can’t make that same effort in race relations and the war against Covid-19.

    Enjoy the holiday.
    Ginger

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Ginger. It is sad to read s poster talking about 1942 and realize it still applies in many ways almost 80 years later. For now, I toast the folks who made this country an Arsenal of Democracy. Those people worked very hard to bring their lived ones home.

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  2. This was such an interesting post today, Dan! I had watched a history of the automobile this weekend and did not know that Edsel ever produced airplanes, or that Harley Davidson manufactored motorcycles for the war. I had to share this one, I hope they found it as interesting as I did! I was also surprised to see women credited for their war efforts.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Women stepped up, big time, Kim. Without their effort, we would not have eon the war when we did. We may not have won it at all. Germany introduced missiles and jet planes near the end of the war. If they had had another year to perfect those weapons, things might have ended differently. As for the manufacturing sector, they learned how to make everything.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love museums that share information that isn’t widely known. Thanks for the tour. Congrats on all your days being holidays now, for the hard work you’ve in for many years. Hitler. Why don’t humans learn? 😞

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Cheryl. This is why I love going to museums. I’m so glad they are starting to open. I have hopes for this winter. I’d love to get to one a week. As for why humans never seem to learn, I wish I knew. Enjoy the weekend – stay safe.

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  4. Good post Dan. History that should not be ignored or forgotten. Now if I can just figure out what WP is up to. It is looking for me to sign in again before commenting. Technology is our feind and our friend…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Leaving a $300,000 a year job to work for no pay…..That is amazing. My first Labor Day since retiring, also. It feels weird. Last week I kept thinking of how we would be having discussions at work on who could take of last Friday to make it an even longer weekend. With the way things are now, I doubt that subject is even broached.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Wow. For such a small state, Connecticut seems to have produced a lot–it was definitely punching above its weight class. Thanks, Dan, for the reminder of the “labor” in Labor Day. For many people nowadays, “work” does not involve any physical labor, though the distinction between “labor” and “work” is definitely a blurry one.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We still make airplane engines and submarines here, Mike. But not so many and not so fast. CT had several large manufacturing centers back then. Most of those cities are centers of poverty today. It’s very sad.

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      1. It’s a little strange but the only manufacturing thing I associate with Connecticut is Colt weapons. I tend to think of Connecticut as the center of insurance rather than industry. In so many parts of the US, unfortunately, locations that depended on manufacturing have suffered greatly with many, many factories shut down.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Wonderful tribute and images/articles of the workforce from days gone by.

    Today is the last Labor Day He-Man is going to enjoy as an employee. He’s retiring next month. I wonder if he’s thought about that while he’s out on his bike right now? I’ve certainly been grateful for all the years he’s worked to provide for our little family and his contributions to his employer.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is my first as a retiree. I like being retired now, especially. This would be the start of budgeting and planning and tons of year-end prep activity. I don’t miss that at all.

      I’m glad you enjoyed the gallery.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Very nice post, Dan. The workers of America certainly deserve to be celebrated for their many contributions throughout our history. Hope you had a nice day off. I know I did! Beautiful weather today.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Lest we forget, it began as a rather controversial Communist holiday and a lot of y’all weren’t that happy about celebrating it, hence moving it to September (which, presumably, is a less commie month than May, when it was originally celebrated) to make it more your own.

    We still have a bank holiday on the nearest Monday to May 2nd over here because nobody cares. ;~}

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There was more than enough controversy when this holiday began. Still, the labor force highlighted today is not controversial at all. These people were as important as the soldiers on the front.

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  10. I really enjoyed this post, Dan. My dad used to grumble and call this a ‘union holiday’. It was controversial, yet it has come to mark the end of summer and the beginning of school. It has also become somewhat patriotic, which is nice. The museum looks wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. When you stop to consider the conditions the original labor movement was trying to improve, I think their methods were understandable and I think they had a right to celebrate. I saw a few posts this year celebrating essential workers. All of the workers during WWII were essential to the war effort.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I absolutely agree! I find it interesting that it was controversial when you consider how deplorable conditions often were. Yes, all workers during WWII were essential.

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