Random Hiatus Doors – #ThursdayDoors

I was surprised they didn’t replace the historic door, but I’m glad they didn’t.

The first two weeks of the three-week break from Thursday Doors were very hot here in Connecticut, not a great time to go hunting doors. I did manage a couple of trips, actually more like taking the long way home from an errand. On the other hand, whenever I could, I took a few minutes to get a couple of door photos. Silly times, like while I was waiting for my barber, and while I was stuck in traffic after some sort of street construction caused a detour.

Normally, these are the kind of doors I would stick in a folder for when I have no other doors. Today, I’m going to share them to give myself time to organize the doors I have been able to collect in September. Today’s doors are described in the gallery.

Thursday Doors returned to its normal frequency last week. Each week, our wonderful host, Norm Frampton, welcomes door lovers from around the world to his site. We collect interesting doors and we bring them to Norm’s place to put them on display. If you have some doors you want to share, or if you just love looking at doors, head on up to Norm’s place and join the fun.

70 comments

  1. Oh! That incinerator!!! I would’ve been afraid to go near it! Interesting collection of doors, windows and buildings. Love all the brickwork and details.

    We had a mailbox just like that once until one Halloween night when kids decided to destroy as many mailboxes as they could, ours being one of them! 😡

    Yes, that gate must’ve looked fantastic after that hike! Lol.
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sure the incinerator is no longer in use, Ginger. It’s interesting though, as this was a private residence. I can imagine being a kid with access to an incinerator.

      I’m sorry about your mailbox. Sometimes, kids are stupid, especially when there’s more than one of them.

      I kept looking for that gate as we trudged (ok, I trudged, Faith walked) up the road to the park entrance.

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  2. Hartford has some really cool old buildings. I love the arched windows and the hinged ones! That hike up Mt Tom looked amazing in your post about it. The ice cream window is the best. And I see they have your favorite seasonal flavor! 😉Happy door hunting.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You have a good eye, Cheryl. My favorite flavor there is Pistachio, I have never had, nor will I ever try the Pumpkin. I loved those hinged shutters. They seem to fit perfectly. As for that gate, I swear they moved it several hundred feet while we were hiking.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. A fun and varied collection this week Dan. I think your incinerator door is a first. I remember a few apartments in my youth that still had those but wow, I can’t remember when I saw one last. The wonderful decorative balconies on that Hartford multi-family building make for a beautiful facade. Excellent stuff!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I doubt the incinerator is working, but the house is now a the museum of the CT Historical Society, so I understand why they left it there. I was very happy to find it. Those balconies are on so many buildings in the south end of Hartford.I need to get a better picture, but with parked cars, narrow streets and traffic, it’s hard to get a good shot.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I love all the brick, the portico over the door they kept, and the arched window on the side of that building, and the lovely white fencing for the balconies of the apartment building. The ice cream shop would be good on a hot day. I had a tradition of stopping at Marianne’s ice cream shop whenever I went to Santa Cruz, CA. unless it was closed. If you got there and the line was only 5 people deep it was your lucky day. Normally the queue is a long one. I haven’t found a good ice cream shop here yet. At least not one with homemade ice cream in 105 flavors. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Isn’t it often how the door is framed that give them character? I love the pillars. Thank you for your reply last week – am slow in getting back in immediate responding after so long being away from the computer. Read somewhere you went over to the new editor – is is doable for us who have no technical gene?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The new editor isn’t too bad. You just have to get used to switching grime paragraph to image blocks. I still don’t like it, but it’s working and I’ve gotten used to it after 6 weeks

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  6. Too much good stuff today Dan. There is nothing so good as seeing the “I made it I survived” point of a good hike. Except maybe the sight of that closest watering hole. Like the Rocking Chicken. I think those double door/windows used to let out onto a porch judging by the shadow on the brickwork below. As for the incinerator door it reminds me of the containment facility for Ghost Busters. Was there a Cadillac ambulance parked near by ? Thanks !

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I do enjoy a brick building, Dan,and I like the decoration above the doors of the multi-family building. The gates also caught my eye and ice cream? Well, who cares what the door looks like? I’ll pass on pumpkin ice cream though. :-) Went into Costco yesterday and found not only Halloween things but Christmas treats and treats!!! Yikes!

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was in Home Depot. They have a wall of large Halloween decorations and there are boxes of Christmas items waiting to be unpacked. Brick buildings are popular throughout the south end of Hartford. I hope to get pictures of more of them. I will be passing on the pumpkin ice cream as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed this, Gwen. Te south end of Hartford has a bunch of those multifamily buildings. I hope to find a few more to share. They are all similar, but they have unique interesting details.

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  8. I think these doors are rather interesting, Dan. I enjoy these Thursday Doors posts. We are going away next week for the first time in over 6 months. I am hoping to collect some nice doors for these posts. You can never see house doors in South Africa, they are hidden behind huge gates.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Hi Dan – those are imposing well-built buildings, granted from an earlier era, that the hospital have absorbed into their campus. The multi-family building looks quite delightful … garbage drops – wonderful … the first ones I saw were in Paris in about 1964. Your Mt Tom walk let us see beautiful vistas … except for the transmission facility – but understand its need. Glad the house has been finished off so well … ice-cream recently … a deserved treat. Also those casement windows are a change – but so often the way windows used to be. Excellent … hiatus! Cheers and have a happy weekend – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

        1. It’s funny, Paul. Norm was doing it for a while ahead of the rest of us. Then he just made it easy to join him. It has helped me to notice more about the places I’ve been, and to learn some of the history.

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  10. I really enjoyed this doors post, Dan. The door in the building that Hartford Hospital bought has such a lovely fan light. That got me thinking…I don’t recall many doors with fan lights outside of New England. The chute really does resemble the disposal slot on the Enterprise.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I love 698-700! It reminds me of the buildings that are now student housing on 4th Street in Louisville, Kentucky, near U of L. Never lived in any of them, since I only went to U of L for one French summer school class, but I’ve driven by them many times when I lived in Louisville. Such character.

    Liked by 2 people

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