Investing in Tech – #WATWB

I am late for this blogfest, but I’m still happy to bring this article to view. For over ten years, beginning when our daughter started high school, I was on a committee in our school district that worked to define and fund programs for kids who wanted to learn skills that would let them find quality jobs without going to college. These are students who wanted to go into the trades, or learn other skills that could quickly be put to work.

We worked to help these kids for two reasons, 1) they deserved the help, and 2) here in the US, there is a growing shortage of people working in the trades and in manufacturing. So, when I read about Haas Automation putting a 5-axis machining center at every community and technical college in the state of Louisiana, I knew I had to share that story. These machines cost about $125,000 (US) each. According to the article,

The manufacturing skills gap is widening, and job candidates with 5-axis CNC skills are in high demand. To help meet the need of advanced manufacturers, the Louisiana Economic Development’s (LED) FastStart program and the Louisiana Community and Technical College System (LCTCS) created a partnership to install the CNCs in all 12 LCTCS schools.

The “We are the World” Blogfest is in its third year. This blogfest’s goal is to spread the message of light, hope and love in today’s world. We are challenging all participants to share the positive side of humanity. This month’s co-hosts, Sylvia McGrath, Mary Giese , Shilpa Garg, Sylvia Stein, and Belinda Witzenhausen, welcome participants. You might want to join us in during future months. #WATWB is a blog hop on the last Friday of every month. If you want to SIGN UP for WE ARE THE WORLD – Click HERE to be part of the Light.

Today’s gallery is from a couple very short walks with Maddie.

63 comments

    1. When I was on that committee, the local community college partnered with the local aircraft engine manufacturer to create a training program that focused on the emerging skillsets. It takes a lot of money to do that, but it pays dividends for everyone involved.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I believe in boosting the trades idea. Many young adults just don’t learn by books, they need and/or want hands-on training. Many simply don’t have an interest in the scholarship area either.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Support for education in trades and mechanical areas is mixed. Some school administrators still downplay the notion of this type of education. It’s sad. As you say, some kids learn better in a hands-on environment and some excel in these types of jobs. Jobs that we desperately need to fill in this country.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I applaud the committee and its effort. People understand the importance of trades, but too many fight it. Crazy!!!!! A wonderful collection of images for my morning. The one that caught my eye the most is the one of the leaves on the ground with the camera low looking across the road. Wonderful!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We struggled at times on that committee, with administrators that didn’t want to promote any education that didn’t involve a four-year degree. For some people in school administration, going to college remains the only acceptable answer. That’s sad. I’m glad you like the low images. That’s been my fascination this fall.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Time moves on, … the faces may change but the roles do not. In my experience, the majority of teachers had the same answer as the administrators you mentioned. Sad … very sad.

        PS: God your email and pics. Thanks. Will keep you in the loop.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. All of the trades around here are crying for talented young people to join. We really discounted this line(s) of work for too long. Maddie loves that vest. It’s a snug fit, so it has a Thundershirt™ quality to it as well as being warm. I also think she like the way it looks ;-)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It does. Thanks, Dan. I agree on the companies putting money into the effort. My old company Bayer A.G. had a program that was trade oriented and management oriented. The CEO was a graduate of the managerial program and the first to make it all the way.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Dan – great to see you’ve been helping others over the years and to learn about Haas and Thomas Insights … I think it’s so important for children to experience all aspects of life and thus open the doors in their futures to a large variety of opportunities. Excellent #WATWB post … good to see you … and all the best this week – Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Initiatives and gifts like this provide skills and a wonderful opportunity for employment. I don’t know what this machinery can do, but there is as an obvious need. Thanks for sharing this, Dan. It’s a good story for #WATWB.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Mary. You can thank me later for leaving out the 800-word description of what this machining center does ;-)

      I did want to emphasize the fact that a State and a private company are teaming up to invest in the future of some very capable young men and women.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. That’s a terrific story to share, Dan. Many people seem to forget that schools have limited financial resources. What these folks did is wonderful. Learning a trade that pays well is also a path to college, because many students have to pay for their own education. I didn’t have that (trade) opportunity. I got my degree late in life, while working at a low paying job — and I’m still paying for my student loans. I can vouch for how important that kind of trade-to-college path could be. Yes, what they’re doing is great. Loved the photos. What a cool and unique combination of snow and fall color. Hugs on the wing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s a really good point, Teagan. A lot of these companies will even help with tuition if people decide later that college is a route they want to go.

      When I was on that committee, we entered into a partnership with one community college. Kids in 11th and 12th grade could take classes there, during a somewhat elongated school day that would count for college credit. If they worked hard, they could complete one year of a two-year associate degree while in high school and with no out of pocket costs. That’s a huge savings.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Mmmmm, leafses and frost crystals. Our color is already gone. We had dry, then heavy rain, then wind. I’m so grateful for people with great color sharing their beauty. Maddie looks like a happy pup. Glad she’s feeling better. I love it, that kids are getting skills. Now if our goofy society would just give essential workers the respect they deserve, instead of celebrating people who make gobs of money but contribute little of real value. Hmph. And you kids get off my lawn!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. With the beating they take from hurricanes, it warms my heart that Louisiana keeps on giving. Such a great story, Dan. That leaf that wishes it had been collected earlier looks like a gingerbread cookie. Wonderful photo! I have to say that Maddie is a great assistant pointing you in the right direction for your photos. Excellent leaf choice, Maddie.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Excellent post, Dan, and beautiful photos. Thank you! I used to work in the inner-cities and I’ve long claimed that it is essential to establish trade schools in those areas. We have some but not enough. Thank you again.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Gwen. Too many school administrators dismiss the value of trade schools or educational opportunities that don’t involve a 4-yr degree. In addition to the kids who simply can’t afford it, some don’t want it and some aren’t ready for a college experience. Teaching them valuable skills is important.

      Like

  9. I love the snow images and the ice crystals on the fallen leaves.

    It’s great that people are starting to realize we need skilled people to work in these fields. Kudos to Haas Automation for their donation and contribution to that cause.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you like those pictures, Deborah. We don’t often see the ice crystals because the leaves are usually wet and rotted before we have this kind of cold weather. I hope the donation by Hass starts a trend.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Dan! Nice to help the kids and from the photos – those leaves ones were really cool – the light in the one from the ground view had such a wonderful vibe and then the frosty ice crystal one was original and marked the transition from autumn to winter ((and just left the reliability of Autumn post so even more along that vibe)

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Such a great initiative, trades are in demand and those in them can have a long and well paid career. Thanks so much for sharing this and for being a part of #WATWB! Have a fantastic week! Stay safe and be well! :)

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Good news is always welcome, but what’s that white stuff? :-) We need to stop denigrating the trades. We need them and there’s nothing bad or dumb about being in a trade. My husband said that being a plumber would be a great job because everybody always needs one so you’ll always have work. It’s true.

    Happy November, Dan.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Everything is inverted today. Having a college degree years ago was a guaranteed asset. Today? It depends. It certainly can help, yes, but it can just as easily make no real difference, or it can be an albatross of debt. Now trade schools are the new college. Remarkable.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We need to prepare for the world that awaits us, Paul. I was lucky to be encouraged by a teacher (High school) and an advisor in college to pursue a career in computer technology. It wasn’t a big trend back then, but those two men saw that I was well-suited to the work and gave me a nudge in that direction. It worked for 42 years.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Wonderful! The problem is two-fold. You point out that manufacturing skills are sorely needed. Also, not every child needs to go to college. There is too much pressure to do so. Beautiful photos! And now we’re back in the 70’s.

    Liked by 1 person

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