Old Wethersfield Business

Welcome to Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments below, anytime between 12:01 am Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

I am still sorting and organizing the photographs I took back in November while visiting Old Wethersfield, Connecticut. I’m not sure what the best way to proceed is, but I have decided to feature business doors today.

I did a little research into “development in Old Wethersfield” and I discovered a 165-page Development Master Plan. I think I heard a few groans. Don’t worry, I’m not going to try and summarize 165 pages in one blog post. I will include one paragraph that I like.

While the overarching goal of the Historic Wethersfield Master Plan is to preserve and protect the distinctive character of the community through thoughtful and sensitive planning, there are specific goals and objectives for other specialized segments of the Old Wethersfield historic district, including historic sites, business development, streetscape improvements, and programming. The goals and objectives, as defined below, guided the planning process which resulted in the development of the Master Plan.

Old Wethersfield Master Plan – John Milner Associates, Inc.

There are buildings in this area of one of Connecticut’s oldest towns that date back to the 1700s. We take pride in the fact that these buildings have been preserved and maintained for 250 or more years, but we also have to accept that the continued preservation is not guaranteed. Many of these buildings are owned by the Historic Commission, but most are privately owned.

These buildings have stood for centuries. Buildings stand, but businesses come and go. Property changes hands. Families are extended by generations, but motives and capabilities are not always extended along the original lines.

I have no interest in this town beyond that of a casual tourist. However, each week, when I view doors from other parts of the world, I am reminded of the fact that buildings like these are the starting point for the United States. We either choose to preserve these buildings, or we don’t. I hope we do.

For today, I hope you enjoy the pictures in the gallery and those in the links provided by the other participants. And, since today is all about looking at doors, I’m also satisfying the JusJoJan prompt offered by Di. So, when you’ve had your fill of doors, visit Di at her place.

If you are in a hurry and don’t wish to scroll through the comments, click to Jump to the comment form.

165 comments

  1. Delightful photos of some interesting architect and doors Dan. I was in Naugatuck CT. Mid December and found it to be a beautiful little town with fascinating old buildings, something I don’t see here. Thanks for sharing and I have to agree , Louie’s bar is inviting, Bar is

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Dan – it looks to be a prosperous town … with well-looked after buildings. I hope they keep all the ‘old’ buildings … part of the States’ history … and here there are perfect places for you to visit anon. Cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    • The area of town does seem to be holding its own, Hilary. They keep revisiting the Master Plan, I believe the first one was done in the 60s. That’s the scary part. It only takes one group of “leaders” to decide history isn’t important. I hope it can hang on.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Dan – presumably the States do not have listed building status … our buildings, if they are of value, are added to a Listed Building List – three sections: with different required criteria attached to them – so they cannot be destroyed/altered, unless after due governmental/court approval. I hope the power that be continue to hold their own and only add to the Master Plan – particularly those privately owned. Hope is the word, I guess. Cheers Hilary

        Liked by 1 person

        • We have the National Registry of Historic Places, Hilary, but sometimes it works a little differently. The “Old Wethersfield” area is listed, but only a few specific buildings are listed. The Registry list includes “contributing assets” but I don’t think they have the full protection of an individually listed building. I’ll be showing some of the individual buildings next week.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. What an inviting place! It seems to me that, when the past is preserved, the folks who lived in it are preserved too. There’s something personal in these old preserved buildings even though they might be far removed in purpose from their builders’ ideas. I cannot imagine anything more boast-worthy than a bright blue ice cream shop. That’s some handsome sundae goo!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s a lovely though, Maureen. The ice cream shop was very nice inside (I should have taken a picture there). People have to work to adapt to old buildings, but it can be done, and the results are charming.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. That’s an interesting point you make. Different countries, even cities, take various steps to preserve the character of certain precincts. I know that in parts of France you cannot change the external appearance of your building. On the other hand, there are historic sites whose look has been changed quite comprehensibly (the Louvre, when the pyramids were built).

    I have doorways, not doors, this week.

    Open doors

    Liked by 2 people

    • Our history is so limited, by comparison, I feel like we have to preserve that which remains. It’s almost 300 years here on the east coast, but there are sections of this country whose history on display dates back less than 200 years.

      Your doorways are beautiful, and the history, while sad, is appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful tour. The Creamery and Cafe was definitely worth the trip! All these buildings, doors, windows and detail to trim are worth noting. I love the way the Village Pizza Restaurant decorated their window. It seems all the current owners take great pride in preserving the history of this little town. It’s an honor to all those who went on before. So sad that in this country we let so many beautiful structures decay, but we pride ourselves on reusing, repurposing and recycling everything. Everything, it seems, but our buildings!
    Ginger

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m glad you enjoyed the tour, Ginger. It takes a lot or work and money to keep these buildings alive. I hope tourism brings the success they hope for. I’ll go back for another sundae, or maybe lunch at Lucky Lou’s. I’d also like to tour some of the preserved historic site (I’ll be showing them next week).

      Like

  6. I love Exhibit A! I’ve not been to Old Wethersfield but now I know what a jewel it is. Your photos are amazing, Dan. Thank you for the journey.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. HI Dan, it is always interesting to me how buildings from certain eras and places have a very specific look about them. In the Western and Eastern Cape of South Africa, a lot of the old houses are the Cape Dutch style of building. I recognise the design of some of the buildings in your post as being similar to others you have posted from a similar time frame and, presumably, state or geographical area.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Not many buildings from the 1700s remain, but there are quite a few. Wethersfield was founded in 1633, so it was fairly well established in the 1700s.

      Thanks for adding your doors to our mix today. You have some lovely photos.

      Like

  8. What a beautiful town, Dan. I liked every one of these. Places that are called ‘cafe’ or ‘kitchen’–I automatically assume the food will be good. Something about those names sounds like the perfect place to eat. It is a shame about so many buildings being privately owned… A lot of our older homes downtown are owned by attorneys but have an historical plaque on the house. I don’t know if the attorney rents it for the Historic District or what.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Total agreement from me on the cafe/kitchen names, Lois. Also, when an ice cream shop includes the word ‘creamery’ I’m stopping. The historic society owns a lot of buildings in this area of town. We’ll see some of those next week. The whole area is on the NRHP, but not every building is protected. I hope they can keep it intact.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It is expensive to maintain these buildings and to adapt them to twenty-first century use. I am so glad the owners have seen fit to preserve them. I hope that trend continues.

      The doors you shared today are interesting and beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Okay. Thanks for allowing me to vicariously enjoy that sundae. Ice cream is the one elusive treat we have trouble enjoying here. Transporting from the store with unknown factors like taxi rides or walking makes it highly dubious. The occasional one we get at a restaurant always tastes so good though.
    Lucky Lou’s is HUGE. Is the entire building the bar?
    Yes, Italian food and pizza anytime any day.
    Thanks for the tour Dan, 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Cheryl. I am guessing that Lucky Lou’s occupies the first floor. Maybe the upper floors are apartments of offices. It would be an interesting place to live. I really should check it out – I’d hate to give false information ;-) The ice cream was very good. If you lived around here, you could walk home carrying ice cream today. It never made it above 32 and it’s going down to 8°f (-13°c) tonight.

      Like

    • I love that window. It would have been unusual to have a window that large in the 1800s, but that would be the style.

      I enjoyed your post, very much. You always bring us interesting doors. Thanks.

      Like

    • We had already eaten. We only had room for dessert. I think I’ll visit this town again. It might take multiple visits to check out Lucky Lou’s and the Italian Kitchen and the pizza place.

      I have enjoyed your series from Santa Severa. I’m looking forward to your next stop.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It would be a shame. I hope the preservationists continue to be successful and the owners continue to step up to the significant responsibility of owning a piece of history.

      Your doors are wonderful!

      Like

    • Thanks Natalie. I think you might be right about who ends up a Lucky Lou’s 😏 If I get back, I hope to check out the bar.

      I liked your fun colorful doors today. Hard to pick a favorite there.

      I hope you’re having a great weekend.

      Like

  10. I’m with you in hoping that buildings like these that date back to the 1700s are preserved. I find it endlessly fascinating to see how people lived their lives hundreds of years ago. Great photos and history.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. “We either choose to preserve these buildings, or we don’t . I hope we do.” Perfect words, Dan. I hope so, too. And, I hope you go into Lucky Lou’s. Can you take David with you? Maybe Skippy can fill in for Cheryl at the bar so she can join you, too. That would be so much fun!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. “We either choose to preserve these buildings, or we don’t. I hope we do.”
    Sure beats the hell out of ‘ticky-tacky’ which replaces all too many torn down buildings.
    “Little boxes on the hillside
    Little boxes made of ticky tacky
    Little boxes
    Little boxes
    Little boxes all the same…” 😏

    Liked by 1 person

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