Bridges, Bridges & More Bridges

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week (ending today) is the last of the “Fun with the Letter B” series. As you might have already guessed, the topic is Bridges. You couldn’t get closer to the happiness side of my spectrum if you tried.

I grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Pittsburgh may not have the most bridges of any city, but with 456, it ranks in the top-5 in the world. You aren’t going very far in the city or the surrounding suburbs without crossing a bridge. I was born in Bridgeville, Pennsylvania, and it’s almost impossible to get in or out of that small town without the help of a bridge.

My favorite bridges in Pittsburgh are The Sisters. Geographically, they are the 6th, 7th and 9th Street bridges that cross the Allegheny River from downtown Pittsburgh over to the North Shore / North Side. Today, these bridges are named for three famous Pittsburgh natives/residents – Baseball legend Roberto Clemente, artist Andy Warhol and marine biologist, author, and environmentalist Rachel Carson, respectfully.

Faith is scoping out the debris and the “Sisters” 6th, 7th and 9th street bridges – a.k.a. Roberto Clemente, Andy Warhol and Rachel Carson.

From an engineering standpoint, the Sisters are unique as they are nearly identical structures, and they were the first self-anchored suspension bridges built in the USA. I could go into a lengthy technical discussion of what that means, but the most important thing is that a young boy with an Erector Set could build a self-anchored suspension bridge. Well, a boy who was young enough to be gifted the combined pieces of his older brother’s and his older cousin’s Erector Sets.

Pittsburgh was recently in the news when a 50-yr-old bridge along one major artery into the city collapsed. Luckily it collapsed early in the day, and while ten people were injured, there were no fatalities. Ironically, the bridge collapsed the day US President Joe Biden was planning to visit the city to talk about infrastructure.

Bridges are expensive to build and expensive to maintain. In recent years, when we’ve visited Pittsburgh, we’ve witnessed each of the Sisters covered in tarps and drop cloths as they were being repaired. I was happy to see these historic bridges being upgraded to serve for many years to come.

Yesterday, I promised I’d share some information primarily of interest to the people who participate in Thursday Doors. However, if you ever link to your blog posts as part of a challenge, you might be interested as well. If not, skip to the gallery where I have dug up pictures of bridges from Pittsburgh and other places I’ve lived or visited.

A few weeks ago, I introduced a feature where Thursday Doors participants could add “hashtags” (I put that in quotes because technically they aren’t hashtags) to the links they leave in my comment section. Several people mentioned that although they included the tags, they were not collected by my little program script and didn’t appear in the recap. Well, the mystery has been solved, with a little help from the Happiness Engineers.

If you include a link (URL) at the end of your comment on someone’s blog, the link will appear as text, you know, the whole ‘https…’ thing. If one of those links includes a tag, my script will pick it up. If, on the other hand, you press Return and paste your link on a new line in that comment, your link will be embedded in the comment section. That means a snippet of your post and possibly a featured image will appear. However, when WordPress embeds your link, they strip off the tags (as I do when I add your link to the Sunday Recap).

Fortunately, I can edit the comments and remove the extra spacing, but if you’re using hashtags to distinguish your Thursday Doors posts, you may want to add the link inline with your comment text and save me that effort (and eliminate the risk that I miss yours). Now for the gallery:

76 comments

  1. That’s a beautiful shot of the Roberto Clemente at night! I lean a little toward the stone bridge with trains, but that covered bridge is very inviting. I mostly prefer bridges that don’t suspend me in mid-air, but I can admire them while on terra firma. This is kind of like a bridge museum, and I’m finding that a bridge is a good thing to think about this morning. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • When I searched for ‘bridge’ in my library, I was overwhelmed by the choices. I love looking at them, crossing them, driving/walking/sailing under them. They limit your travel choices, but they connect you to places you otherwise could not go. I’m glad you enjoyed this post. I hope you have a great week.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Bridges are fascinating structures. Covered bridges and stone arched bridges are my favorites. But no matter the style, they are masterpieces of engineering. Beautiful collection. I am partial to the Tappan Zee Bridge (it will always be the Tappan Zee Bridge to me) because I watched it erected from its berth. I grew up in White Plains, NY.
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    • That must have been wonderful to see. I’ve seen many bridges being built, and been around for a failure or two. I like all the bridges over the Hudson, and I’ve crossed them many times. I hope to get to the one that has been turned into a pedestrian crossing, this summer.

      Like

  3. Great collection of bridges! I especially like the CT stone arch bridge and being a fellow Pittsburgh native (Whitehall) it’s wonderful to see all of those. Was the infamous Bridge to Nowhere before your time?

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s always great to see a comment from Pittsburgh folks. I was there when the Bridge to Nowhere was being built. For a long time, I was worried that all the old bridges would be replaced. Now, the bridges I watched being built are the old bridges. The stone arch bridge in CT is only a few miles from where I live. The local Historical Society hall an event on its 150th birthday. That’s when I got the picture of the train crossing. Thanks for the visit and comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Dan–these are such beautiful shots of all the bridges! I do love old bridges, but suspension bridges…those are so fun to photograph. I didn’t know Andy was from PA, either! The only bridge that made me hold my breath–that last one. You’d have to talk me across that one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Lois. Most people don’t know Andy Warhol is from Pittsburgh. That last bridge is on a hiking trail that goes up to the top of that waterfall. You might think you’d want to hurry across, but trust me. Once in the center, you would want to stay and snap some pictures.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad you like these, Jan. I like all types of bridges, but I do have favorite individual bridges. I have to keep adding things like “my favorite stone bridge,” “my favorite suspension bridge,” etc.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. All the images are great, Dan! I’m a huge fan of bridges. My favorite is the bridge with the riverboat beneath. It reminds me of this book I’m reading…😉 I think covered bridges are so historically romantic. Every time I drive over a suspension bridge I either hold my breath or pray-or both! 🤭I hope I did the hashtag thing correctly last week.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. What a wonderful collection of images you’ve made of bridges! I love the old stone arched bridge the best, but that wooden covered one is a very close second.
    I’ve been blessed in that I have seen a few of these bridges that you’ve shared.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Deborah. I’ve included so many bridges over time in this blog, it was hard to choose a group smaller than 50. Fortunately, I can be a hard editor. I’m glad you recognize some of them and I hope you have a great week.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dan, you get 100 bonus points for bridges…my favorite! I love the wooden and stone bridges best, but the one in Oregon is spectacular. When were you and Faith there? How long of a hike is it to the bridge?

    Happy Monday!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Mary. I’ve been to Oregon several times, but I hiked that with old friends I met when I lived in Seattle. I did business with the guy in 2008 or so. It’s a pretty easy hike to that bridge (30-45 min). It’s only about two hours to the top of the falls. And there’s a wonderful restaurant at the bottom 😏

      I always enjoy seeing the bridges you ride over and the ones you pass on your trails.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Pittsburgh took on the identity of “The Golden Triangle” back in the 60s. All the bridges proximate to the Point are painted yellow. Also, all the sports teams wear black and gold uniforms, so it works. You know I love bridges. Thanks for the comment.

      Like

  8. Usually you’re posting the architecture we both love, but now – you’re hitting below the belt with a covered bridge. Ever since I was a kid and road a horse through a covered bridge in Lancaster County, I was hooked by their character and usefulness!!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m happy to hear those bridges are being repaired! I thought Portland Oregon had a lot of the bridges! I wonder how Andy felt about having a bridge named after him. I watched part of a documentary about him and he was very complicated guy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think Portland calls itself the Bridge City or City of Bridges, but it has no real claim to that fame. Pittsburgh has a lot, but New York has over 900. Andy was complicated, but I think he’d like that they named the bridge that leads to his museum after him.

      Like

  10. I didn’t realize that Pittsburgh had so many bridges. Portland is divided by the Willamette and Columbia Rivers and we don’t have nearly that many. We only 15. So our bridges get quiet crowded at times. I love all your bridge photos. :D

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I have so many fond memories of playing on bridges. (There is so much my parents never knew!) That stone arch bridge I think it’s my favourite or maybe the one over the falls. I do love bridges!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. I’m really glad to see that you jumped on this challenge, on the last day too, same as me. I know that you like your bridges, and I love your gallery. I haven’t heard at all about the accident. And that must have been a brilliant hike from the last photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. What a joy to see all these bridges! I particularly like that last one on the right, maybe because it’s out in nature. :-) I like that your birth town started the bridge connection and I laughed at the Biden story.

    Like

  14. Hi Dan – bridges form part of my paternal life … so great favourites. I went to see an exhibition on Tower Bridge (dare I say it years ago) and really should write a simple post up about them – the 10 ‘best’ bridges in the world as I’ve still got the details. I did love the influence of the Scots and their stone bridges when I was in Canada, then too the history of bridges – made first for horse & carriage … I’m always pleased to see your bridges and trains. I didn’t know about Andy Warhol either … but the lift bridge in Duluth is fun to see in conjunction with other conventional bridges. Great selection of bridges et al for us … cheers Hilary

    Like

    • I would read with great interest a post on the Tower Bridge and others. I guess most people associate Andy Warhol with New York City and his Factory days. I’m glad you liked this group. I hope you have a nice week.

      Like

  15. My mother hates bridges especially when she is driving over one. She is scared of the one in Florida. I used to be mean and tell her to look at the water. I tell her how beautiful the water is. lol I have a windows wallpaper that is bridges in Autumn. I love it and use it in the fall.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I love bridges as much as I love trains, and your photo gallery has a fantastic collection. It’s hard to pick a favorite, but I do lean towards the stone arch bridge. Thanks so much, Dan!

    Like

Add your thoughts or join the discussion. One relevant link is OK, more require moderation. Markdown is supported.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.