Joints or Connecting Points – CFFC

This week (yes, I’ve waited ‘til the last day again) Cee setup a Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge that works very well for me. Joints and connecting points are an essential component of woodworking. Here’s what Cee said about the challenge:

“This week our topic is celebrating Joints or Connecting Points. Just make sure your joint, connecting point, corner, etc. are clearly visible in your photo. Have fun.”

Most of the photos in the gallery are from my workshop, and I was having fun at the time they were taken. There are a few more images than usual, but I covered box joints, mortise and tenon joints, tongue & groove joints and a couple others. I made all but the scarf joint. Many of the pictures were used a long time ago in a post describing how I made a wooden tote. If you want to read more woodworking, click here.

If you click on the little (i) in the circle, you can read the full captions (some of which are long).

Happy Monday!

54 comments

  1. Dan, so many “joints” and none serve Corona!

    No wonder your finished projects are so perfect! “Do it right or don’t do it at all” my dad used to say. You definitely do it right!
    Ginger

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks Ginger. My father used to say, “If you don’t have time to do it right, you better make time to do it over.”

      Woodworking is something that can be done efficiently, but not quickly.

      Like

  2. Gorgeous, Dan. I’m a fan of wood and woodwork, although I’ve never tried my hand at it (I’m pretty clumsy and terribly at measuring, so probably not the best for me). I love antique programmes as well, and how they can work out the date of wood furniture and artifacts by looking at how they are built. A wonderful craft that should never get lost. Have a great week.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Olga. I’ve done my best to pass this craft along to our daughter. It’s a wonderful hobby. It’s relaxing and it feels so good to see actual progress.

      Like

  3. I am awed, just as I am by Judy’s quilts. If my dad could see this post, he would salivate; you and he would speak the same language of precision. Something tells me your dad spoke the same language. I would be left in the dust, or, rather, the sawdust.

    Liked by 1 person

    • As I mentioned to Ginger, My dad used to say: “If you don’t have time to do it right, you better make time to do it over.” “Close enough” isn’t good enough in woodworking – you dad knew that.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Oh, Dan–if you are taking order for boxes with sliding lids, sign me up! They are beautiful. And the scarf joint is interesting. I’ve seen it before but didn’t know it had a name. Of course, I named it zig-zag cutting. 😆
    Totally off subject, but is it just me or do you see that little camera thing in the top Right of your photos? When you click on it, it shows similar photos on the internet. I noticed it when I posted my photo of White Paws this morning, and now I see it on your photos. Is WP doing this or is it something new. Luckily, the photos are just random online, but still….strange.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I like woodwork even though I only made a very simple two-tier bookshelf when I was very young. I appreciate good workmanship. I don’t have the tools and practice though. I like to read hubby’s Handyman magazine and follow the step-by-step instructions. That said, I appreciate your perfection in your woodworking, Dan!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. You joined a great collection of images together to meet this challenge nicely, Dan. I loved the last one with plane and all the curled up wood shavings. I can almost smell the fresh cut wood. Someone should bottle that scent. 😀😂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. HI DAn, I have always found woodwork very interesting and have watched my dad make joints for chairs. I’ll tell you a secret, because of my dad, I use some woodwork tools to construct my cakes like a spirit level and wire cutters. My dad also sometimes helps me with constructions issues and gives me tips on how to reinforce walls for houses and ensure figures don’t fall down and that sort of thing.

    Liked by 1 person

Add your thoughts or join the discussion. One relevant link is OK, more require moderation. Markdown is supported.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.