Squire’s Tavern

Welcome to Thursday Doors, a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing your link in the comments below, anytime between 12:01 am Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American eastern time).

According to Wikipedia (and the State of Connecticut website), Peoples State Forest is a Connecticut state forest occupying 3,059 acres along the West Branch Farmington River opposite American Legion State Forest in the town of Barkhamsted. It is managed for forest products, wildlife habitat, and recreational uses that include hiking, hunting, fishing, and snowmobiling.

Some of you may remember the town of Barkhamsted from a post in 2016 featuring doors from the Saville Dam which holds back the Barkhamsted reservoir.

The Barkhamsted Historical Society and The Friends of American Legion and Peoples State Forests (FALPS) work in concert, and many local residents are members of both groups. The Historical Society has leased the building known as the Squires Tavern located in Peoples Forest. After the open house ceremony for the boardwalk FALPS built, and a hike along that boardwalk, there was a picnic lunch at Squires Tavern, and we were allowed to tour the building. I have borrowed the following information about the Tavern from the Historical Society website. I encourage you to visit their site and explore the complete entry.

Squires Tavern – Ullmann FarmU – State of CT

The building being restored by the Barkhamsted Historical Society has seen many owners over its long history.  An 1801 land record specifically mentions the building and other evidence indicates that there was a house on the site at least as early as 1795.  From the 1820’s to the 1860’s the building was owned by Bela Squire and family.  The tavern was operated during at least the early part of this period, and perhaps even before Bela Squires owned it.  The next long-term owner was the Ullmann family who operated a farm here from the 1880’s to the 1920’s.  The farm then became part of Peoples State forest, and the building is currently owned by the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.

Barkhamsted Historical Society

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165 comments

  1. Looks cozy. Are the colours modern? I wonder whether these shades were available and affordable in the early 19th century. There would have been whites of course, but that grey on the bedroom door? Or that particular shade of blue on the closet door? The 19th century was the time of chemistry, so by 1920s perhaps many of these shades may have become common. https://anotherglobaleater.wordpress.com/2022/05/26/side-galleries/#Bikaner#Rajasthan#palace

    Liked by 1 person

    • Muted blue shades were available in the 1800s, and they were quite popular by 1920. I would think the restorers would work to get the colors correct, although this house went through several owners and served more than one purpose in its early life.

      Your gallery today is dripping with wealth. The photos are amazing.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love this building, inside and out. The choice of paint colors is phenomenal, especially the blue (teal?). The wide plank floors remind me of the house I grew up in. Lots of great doors. I especially like the “little” door.

    The ‘china closet’ is to die for. I like the fireplaces too. And the ‘necessity’ is a nice one!

    So glad this place didn’t meet a wrecking ball! Great tour Dan. Thanks for taking me along.
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Ginger. They made such good use of every space. I was in my glory looking at the woodwork and the doors. The State of CT owns the building, but I’m glad they had the good sense to lease it to a group that would restore and preserve it. In my opinion, the State should be paying the volunteers, but what do I know.

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  3. I couldn’t help but notice how doors were inserted as needed without much or any thought to where anything else was. For instance the door right next to the fireplace. Odd, but I’m certain most structures during that era were constructed the same way, not giving thought to geometric design.

    Liked by 1 person

    • They made use of all the spaces they had. I loved finding all the odd little doors. I’m not sure they were too concerned about overall design. For instance, many of the interior doors were built in a different style (4-panel, 5-panel and frames of different widths). I guess they were more practical. Thanks for joining us today, Glynis. It’s always good to see you.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I wish we had root cellars in Texas in case of tornadoes, but as you probably know, our ground shifts too much for that-however-some people do have storm cellars or basements like my brother’s neighbor. At least he has somewhere to go in an emergency!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I recently read about a “trend” of people building, or locating precast storm shelters. I’d hate to have to get up and run toward the shelter, but those storms are scary. We’ve had a few tornadoes pass through/by our little town. I like having somewhere to hide.

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  5. What a beautiful restoration this is–absolutely lovely. Is that a ventilation window over the closet door? Right by the fireplace, I could see things getting a little steamy in there… Back in Jersey, one of my aunts had a root cellar. We thought that was the coolest thing. We just had a basement so, you know, something so much cooler than that!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m not sure what all the doors and windows are for. I would imagine that they had to be creative in getting the heat to move around. I remember visiting one relative and being sent into a root cellar for something. A bit spooky for me at the time.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. How beautiful! I particularly love the little tiny door beside the rocking chair. I always had memories, fantasies of the worlds that resided just beyond those doors. I had an imagination even them. That explains so much!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Always have wanted a chest of drawers with a hutch on it! The green buggy is a nice touch, as well as an outhouse for the men and women! Plenty of doors in this Squires Tavern – a great catch, Dan.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Even though there weren’t lots of fancy things in houses at this time, everything was not only functional but attractive in a quiet way. I like that. The cellar doors remind me of those at my grandparents’ house on the farm. Grandma kept all sorts of home-canned good down there and it was also the place to go if a tornado threatened. I wasn’t too keen on it when I was little because there were lots of daddy longlegs there. :-)

    Thursday Doors…library doors

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    • Yeah, the root cellars and basements at some older homes could be scary things. I remember being asked to venture in and retrieve something – eeeew.

      I liked your library doors today :-)

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad you liked these doors, Manja. It isn’t often I get to focus on one building and actually go inside to explore.

      You have a great collection of doors.

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    • They did a wonderful job restoring this house.

      As for the size of the forest, Connecticut is the third smallest state, I think it would fit inside Arizona 20 times, so I’m certain your parks dwarf ours. Still, this one makes for a very nice hike.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Connecticut is the same size as the county where we lived in California. Nonetheless, size is so difficult to visualize. It seems amazing that you can drive from one state to another in the East in such a short time. Everything is so huge in the West. The fires boggle my mind. It makes me wonder what’s left!

        Liked by 1 person

          • It’s hard for me, too and I think most of us can’t even imagine how large of an area it is. Sadly, one of them was caused by a vagrant burning toilet paper and trying to put it out with his sleeping bag. The other was caused by lightening. I don’t know which is which.

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    • Root cellars, fireplaces (for heat and cooking), outhouses and oil lamps are all lost to progress, I suppose. I remember visiting relatives that had some of these things still in working order.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. It’s a handsome building with rich history. I love the interior color scheme and oh, those old posters of Smokey the Bear! Loved those. I remember the commercials on TV and that great bass voice of Smokey.

    Root cellar doors is something I don’t see everyday!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. That outhouse looks like either white oak or white birch – mighty fine grade wood for an outhouse. Nice place for a picnic. We’re going on a sort vacay – may actually see some doors!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Such a nostalgic collection of photos if this house. It so reminds me the first family ( The Thursby’s) who settled along the St Johns river on the banks of Blue Springs and welcomed the supply boats that came through and whose passenger’s would often stay the night) Even the interior is so alike . Love them!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Holly. This was originally built with a similar intent. The house was built along the stage line, before railroads came into existence. Traveling by stage, people often stopped at taverns to eat and sometimes to stay the night.

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      • It’s so amazing to see these places and imagine the lives that passed through there. The Thursby house and grounds are designated historical sites at blue Springs as he was the first person to settle in What became Orange City. Thank for sharing this beautiful house Dan.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Hi Dan – love the wallpaper by the front door … and the Tavern – looks to be so informative; the Knee Wall is something I hadn’t heard of – but must be right up your street … while the furniture is practical, pretty – I understand you’d appreciate that.

    Hiding the potty and washing bowl makes sense – at least they won’t be broken as one fumbles around in the night.

    Interesting to see Vito Covelli’s art work being exhibited …

    The building looks well restored and a wonderful place to visit … cheers Hilary

    Liked by 1 person

    • You have a sharp eye, Hilary. You picked out details I didn’t expect anyone to notice.

      I don’t know what the condition of the building was when they began the restoration. The only photos I found were of the work to add new shingles and paint the exterior. The interior is set more like a home than a tavern, but I enjoyed walking through.

      Knee walls are typically found in attic spaces. This one seems to be at the base of a staircase, perhaps from the second floor to the outside. Those frugal New Englanders wouldn’t waste any space. I’m sure they could stuff something in there. Also, highlighting these awkward intrusions by one feature into another is often better than trying to hide them.

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  13. Thanks for the bit of history, Dan, and the great photos. The building is so “New England.” I’m surprised I never visited there as a kid since my mom loved taking us to historical places. :-) Have a great weekend!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Jan. I’m glad you like these. I replied to this comment earlier. I’m not sure where that went. I like your comment about the dwarves – maybe that’s where Snow White is resting.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. It looks like Peoples State Forest is a nice place for an outing, Dan. Thank you for the history. I like doors inside and doors on furniture also. I revised a previous city tour post with added information and photos.

    Thursday Door – City Tour

    Happy Father’s Day to you. I’m glad you just had a nice visit with your daughter.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Thank you for this moment in the past; I’ve had quite enough of the present! I think there is something calming about walking through a restored place like this — at least there is for me. You certainly found a wealth of doors in it! It would appear that a lot of people have worked hard to bring this history to life.

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    • A lot of people have worked hard. One of the things you learn when you get into the details of these projects, is how many people are involved. Everyone adds something to the mix. A large volunteer group can accomplish a lot, and they did a great job on this house.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. […] Started this weekend with an air conditioning breakdown. So with several fans running, we wait for the repairman while temps are expected to reach 90 degrees–heat index of 100. Thankful for that warranty about now. So until later in the day, I’ll be dormant in my usual weekend housecleaning. Is that a complaint??? Nope. hehe But getting tired of that Murphy’s Law thing where 3 things break in a row. Annoying. So, pardon my below par introduction. Let’s get on with the Thursday Doors entry! […]

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  17. Is the book a new release or did I miss the original mention? Congrats either way and a Happy Father’s Day! Also, I need that hutch cabinet in my life for some quilt display/storage! :)

    Liked by 1 person

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