Weathered, Burned/Burning Wood

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge for this week, according to Cee,

“This week our topic is Weathered, burned or Burning Wood. There are many possibilities for this week. Have fun.”

I had fun looking for these. Some have appeared here before. The first four are new to WordPress. The next group is from Old Sturbridge Village during Christmas by Candlelight. The sad group is the mill building, next to where I once operated a cabinet shop, that burned several years ago. I end with some pictures of our grill and wood stove and a coffee table I made from a weathered and worm-eaten slab of wood.

If you like speculative fiction with a bit of family sarcasm, you will enjoy these books:

Knuckleheads

The Evil You Choose

58 comments

    • Happy Monday, Judy. It was 17 when my wife first checked. It was 20 when I went for my walk. Fortunately, I can stay inside this morning. Unfortunately, I have a dentist appointment. I hope you have a great week.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Dan, I’m so old and weathered now I feel right at home with your photos!! 🤗

    The ‘organic’ made in America table is a thing of beauty. A testimony to your craftsmanship. And that barn is a beauty….a symbol of days gone by.

    The poor neglected park bench is screaming for some TLC. I think a picture of it should show up at the Parks Department!

    16 degrees here so your wood-burning stove looks very inviting!
    Ginger

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Ginger. The bench is an old photo. They have al been replaced, albeit not by the town, new benches were donated by the Lions Club.

      The table is living out its days in Florida with its new owner, the best boss I ever had and his lovely wife. He always admired that table, so I gave it too him as a retirement present.

      We were in the high teens this morning. It was 20 when I walked. I hope you have a great week.

      Like

  2. LOL… Mimi sure is a curious cat! Don’t you just love worm wood? The whole thing is decidedly unique–no two pieces are the same. Fascinating!!! We had picked up a piece of Manzanita wood in the hills of San Diego and brought it home. I had it sitting on top of our t.v. set and at night would hear what sounded like chewing. LOL Finally honed in on the piece of Manzanita–picked it up and there was the smallest scattering of sawdust underneath the wood branch! The little guys were still eating the wood!!!! Aaaack! LOL And they could have worked their way down to the woodwork of the t.v. cabinet! No more Manzanita souveniers for this child!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That slab had no current residents, but I spent hours cleaning out all those holes. Those little guys did make a beautiful slab of wood. I wouldn’t have liked finding sawdust under it. That must have been a shock.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Happy Monday, Dan! I love the look of weathered wood in anything – doors, buildings, coffee tables. Speaking of which, it looks like one of the girls would have preferred your coffee table as her scratching post, or at least that was her expectation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We won’s see single-digits until January (I hope), but when we do, we will have a fire in that stove. That’s for sure. I love old weathered wood.I prefer burnt and burning wood to be in the woods stove or the grill.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Weathered wood shows a story. We can’t always read it but it speaks of a life well lived or died. I love the look of charred wood for that reason. And of course if one doesn’t know the story, one can always make it up. There is a comfort in old charred wood and I love the smell as it burns. That sounds a little creepy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think that photo originally was included with the story of how I set our Thanksgiving turkey on fire. I never thought about the fact that those buildings were constructed largely out of chestnut. It is sadly funny.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad I took that photo when I did, Cee, those benches have all been replaced with ones made from a composite plastic material. The mill building fire was a sad story. It will be replaced by a park. It was one of the few mills standing that still spanned its original water supply.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Brrr! It’s colder there than here. It was 9 degrees when I got up today a couple of degrees warmer than yesterday. Your wood burning stove looks warm! The cats and I would be jockeying for the best position in front of it. 😀

    Do you still have the coffee table or did it land in an office? I seem to recall something like that. It’s a neat table.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s one of the archive photos. It was 17 this morning. We usually don’t see single-digits until January. That’s when you’d have to fight MiMi for the front row seat.

      I used the coffee table in my office for several years. My boss retired before I did, and I gave it to him as a retirement gift. He used to stop in and admire it. I told him, if his wife agreed, he could have it. She did. It’s living the good life down in Florida now.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I will always be partial to your photos of Old Sturbridge; there is something wonderful about such places. It couldn’t have been wonderful living there — I can’t imagine ever being warm in winter — but it’s wonderful to visit the past like that. I love the barn in the snow, and I was glad not to have a mouthful of coffee when I read your comment about “looks like my turkey.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • The photo that “looks like my turkey” followed a post about how I set our Thanksgiving turkey on fire while trying to cook it on the grill.

      Our daughter and I will be making our annual visit to Christmas by Candlelight in two weeks. I can’t wait. There’s something special about wandering around the village on a cold, dark night.

      Liked by 1 person

Add your thoughts or join the discussion. One relevant link is OK, more require moderation. Markdown is supported.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.